18

This is a variation that was played fairly frequently, but it has been more or less worked out to a draw, so it is less common at the top levels now. The Ruy Lopez is a very concrete opening, and the capture on c6 has to be carefully considered as it relates to the exact position. In terms of opening principles, you're giving up a bishop for a knight ...


13

Some things that are probably part of the answer, but probably not complete and concrete enough: 1...a6 won't come. There is no threat to a pawn on e5, the knight isn't pinned, the only point of 3.Bb5 is to exchange it on c6. So black doesn't waste a tempo on forcing white to do what he was already going to do. On the other hand, black has a choice to make,...


9

In this particular position both ...ab6 and ...cb6 are reasonable. Generally speaking I would prefer to take toward the center because the doubled pawns are not weak at all when they have neighbours and the enhanced control of the center might prove useful. Here however ab6 has the minus that it allows White counterplay thanks to the outside passed pawn ...


8

Isolated double pawns like in your example are considered to be both a static and a dynamic weakness. It is a static weakness since the pawns can no longer defend each other or be defended by other pawns. It is a dynamic weakness since the front pawn is blocking the advance of the pawn behind. It is strategically important for the opposing player to control ...


6

I first need to note that there is a fairly large difference between the structure in your first diagram and the one reached in the Nimzo-Indian line: in the first diagram, white has not yet played d4. This gives him the option of playing c4 and c3, which is actually quite a strong structure as the d4 square, which would normally be weak with pawns on c4, d3 ...


6

It's always a matter of tradeoff. You an find plenty of IM & GM games where a player accepts doubled pawns because they feel it's worth it in that position. In this position, the doubled pawn is lending support to the center, is not making the king weak, and provides an open file for the rook. The black d pawn is restricted, and trading on d5 would ...


6

A few things: 1) White's actually not wasting any tempi. He has to move his bishop out anyway (in order to castle). Then, once on b5, taking on c6 doesn't waste a tempo since Black has to spend a tempo recapturing. 2) The doubled c-pawns are more of a big deal than they'd be in, say, the Ruy Lopez Exchange variation. Since Black has a pawn on c5 instead of ...


6

It is a solid structure indeed, avoiding one of the most important weaknesses of doubled pawns, which is that they're generally hard to protect. Also, they're less easy to block than just a c- and d-pawn, since the backward pawns can attack enemy pieces on the blocking squares. However, this structure only influences the b-, c-, d- and e-files, while a '...


5

The structure itself isn't weak, since as you mentioned all of the pawns are solid and protecting each other. The problem is that you can't do much offensively with these pawns. Take the following example: Black has his c-, d-, e-, f- pawns. White has the pawn structure you mentioned. Notice how White is unable to block Black's f-pawn. Also, how is White ...


4

Some impressive people consider bishops marginally stronger than knights, though the board position is critical. Reference below. The black Q is freed, perhaps saving black a tempo. The black w-squared B is freed, saving a tempo. The white w-squared B is gone, after 2 moves were spent on it. Black's pawns are doubled, but they still hit the d-file. Not so ...


4

In order to answer your question, pros and cons of the doubled pawns must be listed. I shall start with pros: You get additional open file; You get additional diagonal; you get addition protective or attacking power; Let me explain the last statement with the example from football. Imagine you have 2 players standing in a line, one being in front and the ...


4

A lot of it is simply to create an imbalance. Nakamura has mentioned this before about a different opening B-for-N trade, and sometimes it is done without even getting doubled pawns in return, like an early Bg4 in the Slav then putting the pawns on c6 d5 and e6 to retain some control of the light squares. Even in the Caro-Kan Two-Knights variation you see ...


3

The main reason is that White does not want to face Nd4in many lines. They want to make sure they will "hurt" Black's pawn structure with Bxc6. Compare this line with others where the Black knight is actually pinned, like 3...d6 for instance. There, White has no reason to hurry and trade so quickly


3

It is just a matter of taste. There are pluses and minuses to the move, but the strategic idea is gaining a better pawn structure. I have played the Exchange 4.Bxc6; the Deferred Exchange 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.Bxc6; and the Double-Deferred Exchange 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Bxc6. All have unique flavors and Black has to know the ideas in each or risks a very bad game. ...


3

Bad: They can't defend each other like adjacent pawns can. Good: They give you an extra open file for your rooks. Usually the bad outweighs the good, but there are a zillion exceptions. Most beginners are overly afraid of having doubled pawns.


3

There are a few disadvantages: You trade your light-squared bishop, your best attacking piece. You give Black the bishop pair. The likely followup is an exchange of queens and an early endgame. If you like to attack and don't like to play against bishop pairs, don't play this variation. Do play this variation if you are confident in your play with two ...


3

If the doubled pawns created after taking the Knight leave a b- or g-file half open against your castled King, it might be relatively easy to create an attack against your King if the opponent's Rook leverages the half open b- or g-file by building pressure against your King's castle.


3

In general, the two bishop advantage is worth half a pawn, while double pawns are only a minor disadvantage. Sometimes doubled pawns can be an advantage if they do not block your pieces and control important squares. OTOH, creating doubled isolated pawns on a half open file is likely to be worth the loss of a two bishop advantage. Long term imbalances that ...


2

Let's see, what is the original question? The poster thinks that taking a knight with a bishop should be good if it results in the opponent getting doubled pawns. And the poster also specifically asks about bishop takes knight. I will address both parts of the question. Of course, everything depends on the position. So it is difficult to give a general ...


2

I take it that you feel that you are at a disadvantage because you have a bishop and a knight against a bishop pair in a reasonably open position. (If the position were closed, having the knight might be an ADvantage.) Most likely, your knight would be pinned by one of the opposing bishops, and this pin would result in a doubled pawn. I can think of two ...


2

This reminds me of this article by Jeremy Silman. The position you discuss is difficult to evaluate, as both parties have assets and drawbacks. The first thing to notice is that the position is closed. Thus, if it doesn't open up, certainly black is not standing worse because of the two knights. However, these knights are severely restricted, and if you ...


2

ad 1: Partially, yes. Ng6 is a good move but it will get surely met by white's g3. That's natural. Still u want to move your knight from f8, this square is for your rook. ad 2: Of course c5 was a good move. You played the opening correctly! ad 3: Yes, the natural plan is to prepare f5 break. Something like Ng6, Rf8, Nh7, f5 ad 4: I would say rather equals....


2

The structure lacks mobility and is therefore inherently weak. The c2 and d2 pawns can not advance if attacked.


2

Isolated double pawns are considered as weakness in general except rare occasions where they play a crucial role in defending important squares. There is no general rule of pawn islands with double pawns close to the centre and each case should be analyzed separately. These pawns are not considered as a weakness since they can either establish a strong ...


2

Here all is about whether white a-pawn will be strong passed pawn or weakness on semi open file. Possible undoubling is just a side effect of more important consideration. If you can blow the kingside, make your center as solid as possible and wait a3 will become a serious weakness with white pieces tied to defense. If you can't, you will have to deal with ...


1

4 Bxc6 became popular after Fischer made extensive use of it. He followed up with 5.O-O and although this is no longer fashionable at GM level, a lot of lesser players are uncomfortable. White can choose to develop an attack against the King (because the center is closed to counterattacks) or play for a favorable ending, and can keep the options open for ...


1

I think Olivier is right to prefer axb6. The drawback of allowing White a potential passed pawn is not serious, unless it occurs at some late stage of an endgame. Until then it is just a backward pawn on an open file. But Black also has a great position on the other wing. A Fischer block with Rf3 must be taken seriously. In the general situation, you should ...


1

Since it hasn't been mentioned yet, I will also put that double pawns loses control of the squares infront of them.


1

The bishop pair is usually stronger than B+N or N+N. While doubled pawns are usually weaker than two adjacent pawns. My advice is to look at the pawn structure and king placement to guide your decision whether to allow your opponent to exchange a bishop for your knight and leave you with a doubled pawn. Let's start with the Spanish system [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2....


1

One important aspect of doubled pawns is, that pawn majorities, which encompass doubled pawns, usually aren't able to create passed pawns on their own, i.e. without help from another piece: So in this position, although material is even, white will win by creating a passed f-pawn. Black isn't able to create counterplay with his own majority because it has ...


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