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50

As the old poem says: For want of a nail the shoe was lost. For want of a shoe the horse was lost. For want of a horse the rider was lost. For want of the rider the message was lost. For want of a message the battle was lost. For want of a battle the kingdom was lost. And all for the want of a horseshoe nail. Exactly the same principle applies in ...


32

I'm not at all disagreeing with the existing answers - both sound. Indeed every pawn is a potential queen. However, one aspect of the question remaining is: why struggle for a pawn as opposed to a more decisive plan? In the games that you are watching, if they are between capable and well-matched players, very often the game will be quite well balanced with ...


13

Black is going to lose the bishop regardless. White is attacking the queen in such a way that it will have to move (or be captured), and there are no available safe squares from which it can continue to protect black's bishop. After the queen retreats, white will be free to capture the bishop with his bishop. By playing Bh3 first, black can at least generate ...


11

This is a bit trivial as an answer, but too long as a comment. You claim that you can develop "as good as White" but that is simply not true. White begins by interposing the Bishop 4.Be2. You play 4..Bg4. It is now a mistake to play 5.Nf3 because 5..Bxf3 spoils whites Pawns and makes his King insecure. But 5.d4! also gains a development tempo, and forces ...


11

Another point which has not been raised by the excellent answers above is that pawns are easy to block. A pawn can be blocked by just one piece in front of it, and it cannot take the piece which blocks it. Contrast this with any other piece, which can take a piece which blocks its movement (barring other circumstances such as a pin). This property means that ...


10

You haven't understood the puzzle. The puzzle asks you to find the best move for white after Bxg4 by black. It does not ask you to find the best move for black after Rh1 by white. Having found Rh1 for white the moves that follow are illustrative only. They do not show all the possible black replies and there is no suggestion that the line chosen for black is ...


10

Preceding answers and comments make many good points. Why struggle for a single pawn? The simple answer is: Chess games are mostly won by material advantage! Generally being up a single pawn in an otherwise safe position is a clear advantage, often a winning advantage. In such a situation a GM analyst might say: And the rest is technique! Of course there are ...


8

The main point of the engine recommending exd5 is because it opens up the diagonal from c8 to h3. By playing an early e6, the bad light squared bishop is really weak and has terrible scope, which is why taking with the e pawn could be followed with developing your bishop onto a square on a more open, free diagonal in the future. As long as you castle and don'...


7

Avoid queen mating on g2 is easy: f3, Qg3, Qh3+ are decent options Re4, Kf1 also prevent immediate mate but are not good Winning this position is objectively speaking impossible. Black is up a piece and white does not have sufficient compensation for it. Most players would resign if playing somebody of 1800 strength or even less. If black is a beginner and/...


7

The answer by @Brian Towers is both beautiful and true, but not always true. It is perhaps true if you think of every pawn as a potential queen. However, in endings, especially in Rook endings, the textbooks will tell you not to be drawn into passive defence but to keep your pieces active, and counterattack. That being said, you may not have the choice. ...


6

Having the kings indian as my main opening in response for 1.d4 I see nothing immediately loosing (I might be wrong) and would personally be happy to play this position. The variations I have considered are hopefully inline with my argument that black is doing fine and If I have missed something obvious or have misrepresented white please let me know. ...


6

I Suspect that after 3... Rxd5 4. f7 is strong enough: [FEN "1r1r3k/7p/5Pb1/p2BpRpq/1pP5/1P1Q4/P5RP/7K w - - 0 1"] 1.Rgxg5 Bxf5 2. Qxf5 Qd1+ 3. Rg1 Rxd5 4. f7 The obvious threat is Qf6 mate. Starting with the variations in which black tries to cover f6 we have: If 4...Rb6 then 5. f8=R# If 4...Rd6 then 5. Qxe5 Rf6 6. Qxf6# Since all variations ...


6

The "e" columns being open is not an issue for king safety. Your king is only there temporarely. After ...exd5, Black would probably follow with ...Bd6 and ...0-0, then at some point ...Re8 to exploit the semi-open file. ...cxd5 is a playable alternative, but your c8 bishop would become a much worse piece. It's hard to see how you'll liberate him ...


5

The 3. .. Qe5+ is not a great continuation for black. Because: It does not threaten anything really. White can block with developing (!) a bishop: 4. Be2. It places blacks Queen in the center very early in the game where it will be a target of the attack for many whites pawns and pieces. Square e5 is far from a permanent position for the black queen, and ...


4

You should think of pawns not as individual units but as a group acting as one unit. If one pawn is one "point" then the entire pawn formation is 8 "points". This actually makes pawns one of the most powerful units in the game. The pawns are your front line and do an excellent job of defending each other in diagonal lines. If your ...


4

But why it's a bad move? You are moving your queen to a square where it is going to be attacked again soon and then you will have to move the queen for a third time. Meanwhile white is developing fast and you have no pieces developed.


4

One of Petrosian's greatest strengths was his prophylactic thinking; i.e., identifying threats before they arise and neutralizing them. A book which discusses this concept would be good. For example, "Recognizing Your Opponent's Resources: Developing Preventive Thinking". If you want to learn more about Petrosian himself, part 3 of Kasparov's My Great ...


3

Petrosian's Best Games of Chess 1946-63 by P.H. Clarke, published by Bell & Sons is the obvious place to start.


3

In this question the formation is referred to as a "turtle formation", although that's in the context of Bughouse. I've also personally heard it referred to that way in the context of Bughouse when playing over the board (although not with the rooks moved to those squares.) Bughouse aside, there's a lot wrong with doing things this way. The bishops are ...


3

Qe5+ is not a blunder or a mistake but it is definitely inaccurate play. Qa5 (most popular line) keeps a check on 2 central squares as well as Qd8. Defending with bishop Also in the second line you mentioned (Bc2) after Bg4, white has an excellent move d5! Now white has a tempo in development, space as well as development whereas black is trying to ...


3

You could try Owen's defense, which is very much under-represented in all levels off chess in my opinion. Smirnov's 2-part series is nice and clear (although sometimes slightly over-simplified maybe), and he has another 2-part series about using this strategic system with the white pieces. I would recommend playing the Colle-Zukertort at white a bit, the ...


2

You can defend with Qg3 and Qh3 but the position is clearly disadvantageous for White, as they are one piece down


2

Shektman has a great two-volume set on Petrosian's games, but really, to play like Petrosian you need to get very good at tactics. One of the secrets to his playing style was the way he could sniff out the tactical possibilities inherent in the position and defang them before his opponent could take advantage of them. Daniel Naroditsky wrote a little ...


2

Another well-known example is the following: [fen ""] 1. f4 {Bird's Opening} 1... e5 {From Gambit} 2. e4 {King's Gambit} 2... d5 {Falkbeer Counter Gambit} 3. exd5 exf4 {King's Gambit Accepted} A total of 5 distinct names. Bird's Opening From Gambit King's Gambit Falkbeer Counter Gambit King's Gambit Accepted


2

After searching my game base, I located 190 out of 6,168,985 games, with the pawns at: wPa4, b3, c4, d3, e4, f3, g4, h3. I discarded those games that one or both of the opponents lacked a rating, leaving 113 games. I found by tabulating the results (1-0, 1/2 or 0-1) against the rating of the players (between 1900 to 2200), that the score was 27% in 77 games (...


2

When I feed the position to Stockfish (12), it's first impression (depth<20) is that it is won for Black (evaluation at around -8.0). But that's probably just counting material. After some calculation, the evaluation changes to 0.0 - for four different first moves by Black: 1...h6, 1...h5, 1...Nxa3 and 1...Ne3 (still holds at depth 43). That's probably ...


2

In this position, White king is still in the center. I would go for Re8 (with ideas of Nxe4 followed by f5 in-case he has not yet castled; this in itself is a moral victory for Black, since White's center has been dismantled now) If White castles immediately, then Nbd7 to add additional defense to e5 square and then look to expand on the queen side. Also, ...


2

The thing about the Modern Benoni is that White is usually trying to run you over on the e- and f- files. Black adopted a very small stance in the center (d6), and White's pawn play is the price to pay. The difference between these two plans for white: Bb5+, f4, Nf3, with a view toward e4-e5 and the one you describe here Bd3, Ne2-g3 with a view toward f4-f5 ...


1

A pawn is a potential queen (or any other piece you prefer, except the king of course). The great world champion Jose Capablanca was noted for winning a pawn and nursing his advantage into a winning ending. Between skilled players where tactical errors costing more substantial material may be few, it is advantageous to try to gain a pawn to have these ...


1

Another possibility might be the Old Indian where Black plays d6, Nf6, c6 and aims for an early e5. You can also play like this against 1. c4. I think Nigel Davis did a Chessbase DVD on this, called "A busy person’s opening system". But I don't know it and I don't want to advertise it. Although this might be "sound" more or less, I can't recommend such an ...


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