35

EDIT: I opened Mega Database 2012 and found there were 515539 games ranging from the 1400s to 2011. As I couldn't find an efficient way to parse the data, I just used the median move value (I hope it's normally distributed. It's probably not though as the largest number of moves was 277... oh well). The median value was 37 moves, but I'm sure that it's a ...


31

I believe your question essentially boils down to the topic of whether it is possible to completely "solve" chess. Wikipedia has an excellent article on the topic which should give you a good overview. To summarise, the number of possible game variations in chess is estimated to be 10^120. This is a staggeringly huge number, for comparison, consider that ...


31

I did this graph based on 731,000 games played on the free internet chess server by players with rating above 2000 during the last 13 years with non-blitz time controls. The average length is 79 half moves, the median is 70 and the mode is 51. There are also a lot of very short games due to people resigning early. Update: As it turns out, the above curve ...


12

Tablebases are databases of endgame positions, with few pieces left on the board (say a 5-man tablebase, which consists of all legal positions with 5 pieces on the board in total, including kings, say K+Q vs. K+R+B). These databases have the positions 'connected', i.e. they also contain the moves to get from one legal position to another (in particular, ...


12

I know that I, for one, have used them to tell me why a line not mentioned in the books is bad. Most books show you all viable lines of play and maybe a few dubious ones, but a book can't mention all possible variations. More often than not, my opponent will play something very early on in an opening that isn't mentioned in any of the books I have on hand ...


11

I don't have any statistics to back this up, but many openings where black has a large plus against white it isn't necessarily because the opening is actually so bad that it gives black a significant advantage, but because the opening is more popular at a lower level (which is normally because it actually is worse than other openings) so the players who play ...


9

There is a pretty big one if you are willing to spend some 40 euro. This (Million Base 2.2) is the biggest free database I know of.


9

Something which might help here is Chess Query Language. Just like SQL does for relational databases, CQL can search in a database of chess games for positions/games which match certain criteria. I must say I have never used it myself, but it seems to be capable of amazing things, far more complex than what you're looking for. Here is an old article showing ...


8

The statistics show what happened in games that reached the current position. So in your first diagram, there are 28 games that reached that position. White scored 30.3% on average in those games. In 11 of them, Nc3 was played here, and White scored 27.2% in those 11 games. The position after Nc3 was reached 72 times. That obviously includes the 11 games ...


8

Yes, it is call Lomonosov table : link It is all the positions with 7 or less pieces and the whole answer is known.


7

According to the official rules of the International Correspondence Chess Federation, you are allowed and encouraged to. It is regarded as learning an opening. Of course, there are different rules for some sites, but most sites follow the ICCF rules.


7

After reading a bunch of open source code, I just found out that most of them are relying on Chesspresso which is a solid Java Chess library that can handle move validation, PGN parser (what I was looking for), chessboard renderering, etc. The code is well-documented and easy to understand. It took me around 30 minutes to read the code and start testing. ...


7

These databases could be interesting for you: The Week In Chess (=TWIC) (free): updated every week, PGN format Mega Database of ChessBase (commercial): requires the ChessBase gui Huge Database of ChessOK (commercial): requires the ChessAssistant gui


6

What you're looking for is a PGN file that contains several games. You can parse the game data and enter in the opening moves. A great resource is PGN Mentor where you can browse openings and download the appropriate PGNs.


6

No, it would not be possible for such a database to exist. Calculating it would require an infeasibly large computer and the calculation would take so long that your computer wouldn't exist for long enough to complete the task. Claude Shannon estimated that there are around 1043 possible positions in chess and your database would need to store the outcome ...


6

There are quite a few programs - commercial (Chessbase, Hiarcs) or free (ChessX, Scid, Scidb, ChessDB, Arena). More or less, all will provide what you need. I personally prefer ChessX (under MacOS and Windows) using the following steps: Open your database Select Menu View->Players which enables the player explorer Filter the games for your own name You ...


6

Shane's Chess Information Database (SCID) is a powerful Chess Toolkit, with which one can create huge databases, run chess engines, and play casual games against the computer or online with the Free Internet Chess Server. It was originally written by Shane Hudson , and has received strong contribution from Pascal Georges and others. Scid vs. PC began ...


6

You don't need good English to play chess... https://tieba.baidu.com/p/5369964903 is Baidu (China's larger search engine) page on chess. Do you see? The Chinese know Nxf2, Qxe3+, Bg3. The Chinese players don't need a new software because they can use Chinese in a chess software. In the screenshot, I have Mikhail Botvinnik in Chinese in my ScidVsPC ...


5

Here is your requested zip: 2013_TWIC.zip I created a command script for this. See attached. I assumed you are running Windows, but the script is easily adapted to other OSes. For downloading, it uses curl. You can get that at http://curl.haxx.se/download.html, and for Windows, I recommend the msi installer. For unzipping, I used Java's Jar tool, which ...


5

It may depend a little on what your code can access, but either way you should read Ed Schröder's pages on this topic. Schröder was the author of the Rebel Chess software until his retirement about a decade ago. In the '90s Rebel was the strongest consumer/commercial chess software and the first such to beat a GM (Anand). Since retiring he turned Rebel ...


5

All of the Syzygy tablebases are available here: https://syzygy-tables.info/ These cover all endgames up to 7-man, and provide WDL (win-draw-loss) and DTZ (distance to zeroing move) data. Syzygy also distinguishes between a theoretical win or loss that can actually be forced into a draw by the 50-move rule, and one that cannot. Here's an example for ...


5

This question seems to have been answered by TD in ChessPub Forum. I post the answer below: [fen ""] [Date "1996"] [Round "?"] [White "De Groot, Adrianus Dingeman"] [Black "Simmelink, Joop Theo"] [Source "ChessBase"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. d5 Ne7 5. h4 Neg8 6. a3 a6 7. Nf3 Ng4 8. Ng5 f5 9. Qc2 Bc5 10. e3 Ne7 11. Be2 Nf6 12. b4 Ba7 13. Bb2 h6 14. ...


5

In addition to very good suggestions in the previous answers, you might also be interested in Pgnmentor's site (free). There you already have free databases sorted according to players and openings, as well as events (tournament, matches etc.). Of course, you can easily produce such thematic games collections from big databases mentioned in other answers, ...


5

Yes, it is still possible to find new openings. The combinatorial space after 3-4 moves is such large, that there are still many uncharted waters in opening theory. Many of such openings probably violate learned principles and are pruned by experienced players before going deeper into the game tree, but there may be undiscovered gems among them.


5

SCID does everything you are looking for, it's great chess database software.


5

How do people use chess software in large countries like China, India or Russia, if they don't speak English, and more importantly, if they don't even know Latin letters? If they play FIDE rated chess then they are required to know the letters a-h. Here are some excerpts from the FIDE Laws of Chess - Article 8: The recording of the moves 8.1.1 ...


4

I think Daniel's answer is excellent (+1) but want to add a few thoughts anyway. Would a 32-piece tablebase really replace chess engines? The answer is definitely no! To play good chess, more information is needed than whether a move is winning, drawing or losing. Of course such a database would be unbeatable, but it would hardly beat anybody either. To ...


4

This kind of thing isn't done by hand, but by computer programs. It is not too difficult to run some program on a game database and extract all positions suitable for a tactical exercise. Sorting them by difficulty will be done over time, when statistics accumulate how often they are solved correctly. Of course there are tactical exercise positions out ...


4

There exists a 7-men-endgames tablebase available online, the "Lomonosov endgame tablebase". see : http://chessok.com/?page_id=27966 Unfortunately, it is not free yet.


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