36

It is indeed impossible to construct a mating net with king + 3 minor pieces against a lone king in the center of the board. A mating net would require that all 9 squares in the 3x3 block which contains the opposing king be under attack. The king can only cover 3 of those 9 squares since it can't be next to the opposing king. This would leave a 3x2 rectangle ...


14

As a problemist, I can assure you that the term as such does not exist in problem language. Bohemian school did only know three concepts: pure mate, economic mate (all pieces - but not necessarily king or pawns - participate) and both at the same time. Yet, not all hope is lost. At least one Bohemian troll had the following idea: What is the most uneconomic ...


13

The longest known checkmate problem composed by a human is dependent on a few criteria that are generally used by chess composers. Namely, it is a question of whether or not you want the problem to have a unique solution, meaning that there is only one possible solution with Black defending optimally, and if you want the position to be legal or not, meaning ...


11

CHESS PROBLEMS MADE EASY - How to solve, how to compose How to compose chess problems and why (You have to register for free to read it) Chess Wizardry: The New ABC of Chess Problems Compose Like Mozart What are chess problems Additional links Chess Problems The Chess Portal: Chess theory/Chess Problems (that list has many recourses on Chess composition)


10

There are numerous chess problems, whether a checkmating one or an endgame study, that feature certain promotions as a necessity to win. Stalemate is the long-known reason behind doing so. Here is a small sampling. This problem is the first known one to use Bishop promotion, although it is a later correction. Even better it comes with double the fun! [Titler ...


8

It's easy to come up with positions where promoting to knight leads to insufficient material but promoting to bishop doesn't. This one, for instance: [FEN "N5q1/7P/8/8/8/7K/8/7k w - - 0 1"]


8

http://chesscomposers.blogspot.com/p/for-beginners.html For definitions, see Christian Poisson's website Problemesis ("Definitions" menu) For an encyclopaedic website, visit Vaclav Kotesovec The MatPlus forum is dedicated to problem chess and is frequented by chess problem enthusiasts. (Edited December 27th: Now I can insert more than 2 links in my ...


8

White's second to last move must be f5+. So, this is what the position looked like before White's second to last move - [FEN "b7/6pP/7k/7P/4PP2/2PP4/3B2KR/2Q1N2R w - - 0 1"] 1. f5+ g5 2. hxg6+ How to arrive at the solution - In this position, it is Black to play and the Black king is checked by a double-battery of the two rooks and the bishop ...


7

They used to, but now the titling process is handled by the World Federation for Chess Composition. Here's a link to some of the titles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_grandmasters_for_chess_composition


7

A dual is an alternate solution, other than the intended one, after the first move of a problem or study. If it happens on the first move, the problem or study is called cooked instead. dual Ideally, White should have only one move at each juncture that solves a problem. If White has an alternative at any stage other than the first move, this is a ...


6

Thanks for the great links above. Here are some more: Great intro tutorials from a fine composer, Peter Wong. Incomplete but still very useful multilingual glossary of the keywords underpinning "Die Schwalbe" online database of 350,000+ problems. Thousands of retro problems with full solutions, and many articles. Minor cavil: there is a little ...


6

One might simply look at the judging metrics at the World Chess Composition Tournament (WCCT) to derive such an answer. This is from their Rules Annex and details how points are allocated to a composition entry. I've stressed key words that probably represent a figure of merit. Points : Description 4.0 : An outstanding problem: an accurate and ...


6

The answer used to be Yes, via the Permanent Commission for Chess Compositions; in 2010 the Commission became the independent World Federation for Chess Composition, but "both organisations are cooperating". As was the case before 2010, there are three titles: Master, International Master, and Grandmaster, all based on the counts of problems and studies ...


5

First I wonder what is the most economical presentation of bishop underpromotion. [FEN "5n2/6Pk/4N3/7K/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] White to play and win It's mate in 6 (with a dual) gxf8=B! Kh8 2.Kh6(Kg6) Kg8 3. g6 Kh8 4. Kf7 Kh7 5. Sg5+ Kh8 6. Bg7# Here's the only one in PDB or WinChloe with less than 6 pieces. Are knights more economical than bishops?...


5

To start off, with such a requirement, the sequence would have to end in a draw. Well, more than most likely that is. There is a similar concept from another question called the "Nunn Convention." It is a term to describe a move by one side that is the only way to draw, with the extra requirement that it isn't the only legal move. That extra ...


5

The sequence can be arbitrarily long if we allow repeated moves, e.g. [Title "Every other White move allows mate in 1"] [FEN "2B5/8/R7/4rp2/2P5/1PkP4/2p6/2K6 w - - 0 0"] 1. Re6 Ra5 2. Ra6 Re5 3. Re6 etc. Naturally if the "certain loss" incurred by a deviation is allowed to take longer than mate in 1, there are simpler ...


4

Quote from our Autralian friends http://www.ozproblems.com/problem-world/chess-problem : Problems are aesthetic works designed to show an interesting theme – the composition’s main idea. How exactly are themes artistic? It varies, but important factors include subtlety, elegance, economy, paradox, and unity of play. The latter concept of unity is ...


3

Could white have just played Bg4 from somewhere without capture? Black’s prior move was Ke5-e6. This can be fixed by a shifting wNg3 to e3 and wBd4 to g3 in its place. This stops other cooks where White has just given a discovered check. Adding a further wN on c6 also prevents any retractions with the White rook, and the Black king moving to e5. [FEN "8/...


3

See my answer to About retrograde analysis. The Retro Corner is not about composing. but it has lots of easy and hard examples with detailed solutions, comments, etc.


2

The moves themselves are technically forced, so that might be the concept to which you are referring (forced moves).


2

The simplest version of the problem is 'cooked' - there are three distinct solutions: a) setup - White king on B2, White pawn on F5, Black pawn on E7 --> 1) B2-B1+ E7-E5 2) F5xE5ep b) setup - White king on B2, White pawn on D5, Black pawn on E7 --> 1) B2-B1+ E7-E5 2) D5xE5ep c) setup - White pawn on D4, Black pawn on E7 --> 1) D4-D5+ E7-E5 2) ...


2

AFAIK, there aren't programs that generate chess problems On the other hand, there are several well known programs to verify chess problems (even with fairy chess conditions). The main reason is that composing a good problem is kind of an art, the problem should not only be valid (in the sense that it is solvable etc.) but also esthetically pleasing. It also ...


2

depth=2 (+1) I found this position, White has to make two moves (e3, e4) to avoid getting checkmated by Blacks pawn promotion and then has to move to h6 to avoid a draw by stalemate. After these three moves white wins by its own pawn promotion. [Title "depth 3, white to move"] [FEN "k7/Pp4p1/1P6/3p3P/8/1p2p3/pP3P2/K7 w - - 0 1"]


1

First attempt. If the White bishop is removed then it is stalemate which suggests that Black had a piece on g4 and White's last move was Bxg4++. He could retract this and play hxg4 stalemate instead. But White has made 14 pawn captures and Black has 2 pieces left. Hence there are no Black pieces left for the Bishop to take. Any White capture must have been ...


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