7

Having read The Colle Move by Move by Cyrus Lakdawala, Zuke 'Em-The Colle Zukertort Revolutionized & The Moment of Zuke by David I. Rudel, Killer Chess Opening Repertoire by Aaron Summerscale, Starting out: d-pawn attacks by Richard Palliser, Starting out: The Colle by Richard Palliser, played countless blitz and OTB games vs strong players 1800+, I can ...


5

To answer the question at the start of the post, I would say no. The system is easy to learn and play but that won't help you to improve. You want an opening that leads to sharp tactics. I just had a game on ICC against a slightly above average player and as soon as I saw the opening I thought, ok draw. It was. White risks very little but often gains very ...


4

After reading a few of the answers on here, it does seem to me that the Colle is a little misunderstood. Despite the outward, superficial appearance of e3 being a quiet move, the Colle Zukertort or Zuke is actually a pretty attacking weapon. It doesn't perhaps involve the double edged attacks of say the Yugoslav Dragon with Bc4 or Traxler in the 2 Knights, ...


3

To some of you so called experts on opening play... Thinking that what opening you play hinders your middle and endgame technique is totally false. Blaming getting out played in the middle game and losing on the opening you choose is also false thinking. Many GMs and IMs use these systems. If you can't get these openings to work for you then your not ...


3

I am approximately 1850 USCF (ELO) rated and have played the Colle-Zukertort system pretty religiously when allowed by the opponent. I would tend to agree that that the Colle-Zukertort, Barry, and 150 attack provide a pretty broad set of potential response (but I would also have at least some idea of how to play against 1.d4 f5, and 1.d4 e5. Although 1. ......


3

I think the Colle-Zukertort is great as part of a white repertoire, but isn't appropriate against all black responses, especially stuff with ...g6 or a Queen's Indian setup with ...b6 and no ...d5. I usually open with 1. d4 and 2. Nf3. If black responds with ...d5 on the first or second move, then I go for the Colle-Zukertort. After 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6, ...


3

Playing against 1.d4 a similar pawn structure to the Colle, but with reversed colors for black, leads to a defense known as the semi-Slav: [FEN ""] [Title "The semi-Slav"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 {The Slav defense to the Queen's gambit.} 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 {The semi-Slav defense to the Queen's gambit.} The main characteristic of said ...


2

Many people who disparage the Colle have never really studied it. It is solid and has a very clear objective that is easy to understand. The Colle is about accumulating small advantages and this may not fully be appreciated until move 30 or 35. Someone made a comment that learning to play the Colle won't teach you how to play chess, it will only teach you ...


2

1.d4 2.Nf3 is the main line for me. I use to play 150 attack and Barry attack very frequently in my games. They are very good openings and best thing about it is that you attack without any weaknesses. That's great isn't it. But these two attacks are played by me only when the opponent responds with 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6. The g6 move tell us that black is going ...


2

"Aggressive" is a vague word that's usually meaningless when applied to an opening. It's quite possible to be either aggressive or passive in the Colle, or in pretty much any other opening. Aggression lies in how you play the opening, not the opening itself. In the Colle, yes, you can bank everything on the attack on h7 (beginners with the system generally ...


2

I only play Colle system kind of openings (Classical Colle, Colle-Zukertort, Stonewall etc.,) I somehow am very comfortable with the structures it creates on the board. They are not aggressive at all, compared to the other stuff, which is why I have adopted it. On the contrary, the primary advice given to an improving chess player is NOT to stick to a ...


2

The Colle Zukertort is a very simple opening, and can serve as a complete white opening repertoire. It was recommended by FIDE Trainer Jason Ciano, as well as many former top US players. It teaches the white player how to activate the pieces in an ordered function, and, in some lines, achieve equality with a slight pawn center. It teaches good endgame ...


1

We all start as beginners, as we all start on a small bicycle - not driving a car. The Colle or the London are good places to start and learn how and what along with some wins. As we grow and mature as chess players, then we can move on to more challenging or "sharp" openings. Ones that fit our chess personality. Some past grandmasters were attacking ...


1

It doesn't matter if you win fast or win slowly. A win is a win and the Colle will give you the wins you're looking for. You can tell because people are playing all sorts of anti-Colle lines just to avoid this "passive" opening. It's far from passive. White develops his pieces, giving black no targets and then at the precise moment, opens the game with ...


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