7

The weakness is b2 with the absence of the bishop. This is James Rizzitano's recommendation against the London system in his book "How to Beat 1 d4": [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 The bishop is immune due to the b2 weakness (the rook on a1 will drop).


7

Having read The Colle Move by Move by Cyrus Lakdawala, Zuke 'Em-The Colle Zukertort Revolutionized & The Moment of Zuke by David I. Rudel, Killer Chess Opening Repertoire by Aaron Summerscale, Starting out: d-pawn attacks by Richard Palliser, Starting out: The Colle by Richard Palliser, played countless blitz and OTB games vs strong players 1800+, I can ...


5

The London is mostly an attempt to play the Slav in reverse. It is very solid and flexible. Black should be careful not to overreach. Kaufman recommends a King's Indian with a c7-c5 break like Avrukh. I have had luck with the e7-e5 break from the KID. A difficult problem for the original question is if your opponent does not play the London, you have to ...


5

The London system is a system for White where the dark squared bishop is brought out early to f4 after d2-d4. There are several ways in which it can appear: [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 This means it is very hard to avoid meeting the London system after White ...


4

After reading a few of the answers on here, it does seem to me that the Colle is a little misunderstood. Despite the outward, superficial appearance of e3 being a quiet move, the Colle Zukertort or Zuke is actually a pretty attacking weapon. It doesn't perhaps involve the double edged attacks of say the Yugoslav Dragon with Bc4 or Traxler in the 2 Knights, ...


4

Bf5 disrupts your plan to play Bd3 and eventually push e4, but it comes at some cost. The b7 square is no longer protected and black's bishop has left the queenside, so that's a good place to focus your attention. You should abandon your c3 plan and play c4 followed by Qb3 and work on the queenside. Black is essentially playing a reverse London system, and ...


4

It would be easier to answer would you show us some of your games where you tried the f3-plan. 5.Ne5 or 5.0-0 aiming for a quick f2-f3 indeed make sense. However, I would argue that the most logical answer is to quit your Colle schemes (after all, Black has a strong grip on e4...) and switch to 5.c4 (or 5.0-0 first, followed by 6.c4) After 4...Ne4 Black ...


3

Playing against 1.d4 a similar pawn structure to the Colle, but with reversed colors for black, leads to a defense known as the semi-Slav: [FEN ""] [Title "The semi-Slav"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 {The Slav defense to the Queen's gambit.} 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 {The semi-Slav defense to the Queen's gambit.} The main characteristic of said ...


3

"Aggressive" is a vague word that's usually meaningless when applied to an opening. It's quite possible to be either aggressive or passive in the Colle, or in pretty much any other opening. Aggression lies in how you play the opening, not the opening itself. In the Colle, yes, you can bank everything on the attack on h7 (beginners with the system generally ...


3

One of the benefits of the lines shown by Travis J are the transpositions for helping folks like me who do not play 1. d4 d5. I play the Nimzo-Indian and after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 e6 I can play the d5 push and be in the systems he mentions. An even more aggressive option is available with this move order and that's 3. Nf3 c5 to deviate early. Of course, ...


3

Many people who disparage the Colle have never really studied it. It is solid and has a very clear objective that is easy to understand. The Colle is about accumulating small advantages and this may not fully be appreciated until move 30 or 35. Someone made a comment that learning to play the Colle won't teach you how to play chess, it will only teach you ...


3

I think the Colle-Zukertort is great as part of a white repertoire, but isn't appropriate against all black responses, especially stuff with ...g6 or a Queen's Indian setup with ...b6 and no ...d5. I usually open with 1. d4 and 2. Nf3. If black responds with ...d5 on the first or second move, then I go for the Colle-Zukertort. After 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6, ...


3

"Main lines" of the London System (with ...d5) start off with 1. d4 d5; 2. Bf4. There is an important line to learn when faced with 1. d4 d5; 2. Nf3 Nf6; 3.Bf4 (which of course can arise via transposition: 1. d4 Nf6; 2. Nf3 d5; 3.Bf4). This is inaccurate for white because of the following line: [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6. ...


3

I would recommend looking at games of Eric Prie as white. He plays the London a lot. http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1122821205 is a long thread and agood introduction to its issues. There is an article by Prie, where he outlines the issue with Bf4: http://www.chesspublishing.com/content/8/feb06.htm However, Nf3 also has the issue of ...


2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wh5MspHH8A I play this against the London and have had much success with it. In fact, one of my opponents simply stopped playing the London against me because he never won. As in previous posts, I often find white plays a gruenfeld against me instead of the London, but this has not presented me with any problems as black ...


2

You should counter the London System with 1.d4 g6 2. Nf3 Bg7 3. Bf4 c5 4. dxc5 Bxb2. Or 1. d4 g6 2. Nf3 Bh6 (Reverse Guatemala Defense). Since white usually loses without his dark squared bishop, you should trade it as soon as possible. Another solution is 1. d4 h6 2. Nf3 g5. This prevents white from moving to f4.


2

I only play Colle system kind of openings (Classical Colle, Colle-Zukertort, Stonewall etc.,) I somehow am very comfortable with the structures it creates on the board. They are not aggressive at all, compared to the other stuff, which is why I have adopted it. On the contrary, the primary advice given to an improving chess player is NOT to stick to a ...


2

The Colle Zukertort is a very simple opening, and can serve as a complete white opening repertoire. It was recommended by FIDE Trainer Jason Ciano, as well as many former top US players. It teaches the white player how to activate the pieces in an ordered function, and, in some lines, achieve equality with a slight pawn center. It teaches good endgame ...


2

I'd recommend against a Grunfeld white play reversed Catalan lines Against a KID either the Torre or... Or.. Play the French vs KIA lines as white!!! Pretty solid lines Stonewall against delayed c5! Sure! Chances are your playing a Sicilian fanatic who plays that set up against everything... And who at the very least is gonna hate you for A) playing an ...


2

The English GM Simon Williams has just tweeted this - Just finished filming 'The Colle' a DVD for @ChessBase. I must say that the Colle with 1 d4 2 Nf3 3 e3 4 c3 5 Nd2 and 6 Bd3 is basically rubbish. But the 'Colle-Zukertort' with 4 b3 is another matter entirely... Learnt a lot filming this week. That sounds reasonable to me. In other words you are ...


2

The Queen's Indian Defense easily equalizes against London, albeit some what passive. The problem with the King's Indian set up is that Black should be ready to play the Pirc if White chooses the so-called 150 attack. 150 attack is a respectable opening used even by super grandmasters like Anand, Kasparov etc. In 150 Attack White normally goes for the King'...


2

I like this system: [fen ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bf4 d6 3.e3 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Be2 O-O 6.O-O Nfd7! 7.c4 e5!


2

Often black plays b6/Bb7/c5 to support an attack against the White d-pawn, and at times even Na6 to support c5. Obstructing the c-pawn slows down or prevents these kinds of maneuvers. Nc6 is an awkward placement of the knight on the queenside with d5/e6 being played by black, as it has no real good second move from c6 to get out of the c-pawns way, thus ...


1

I've often thought that the author over-emphasized this point. But there are good reasons for ...c5 in Queen's pawn openings. This single move accomplishes three things. 1. Put pressure on d4, as @Jerry Snitselaar has said. 2. Make room for the Queen Bishop, assuming ...e5 is not workable. 3. Create a meaningful open file for a rook--again, assuming ......


1

One thing would be it allows you to put more pressure on d4, having both the pawn and knight hitting it instead of the pawn being blocked behind the knight on c7. The king's pawn is usually supporting the queen's pawn on d5.


1

If white plays e4 with out black having played ...c4, then black can trade the central pawns with cxd4 to reduce white's central control. [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "r1bq1rk1/p2nbppp/1p2pn2/2pp4/3P1B2/2PBPN1P/PP1N1PP1/R2Q1RK1 b - - 0 1"] 1... Bb7 2. Re1 Rc8 3. e4 cxd4 4.cxd4 dxe4 5.Nxe4 Nxe4 6.Bxe4 Bxe4 7.Rxe4 Nf6 (Black can play 2...Ne4, which is stronger, ...


1

I set out to answer my own question with the help of two computers. A Dell desk top using Windows 7 and a Dell laptop using Windows XP. The desktop used Deep Fritz 12 and Fritz 11 was used on the laptop. I played the London opening against Deep Fritz 12 and it appeared to use the Semi-Tarrasch. After I set-up the opening in Fritz 11, Deep Fritz 12 lost to ...


1

There are some very natural easy and wrong ways to play Black against 1. d4 and 2. Nf3 or 2. Bf4. A friend of mine plays those and he continually shows me games where Black loses badly -- even up to FIDE 2600 rating. As Black he tries to get the Bc8 developed quickly, so 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Bf5. I often hit the d4 pawn quickly to encourage e2-e3, so 1. d4 Nf6 2....


1

London system is a little more tricky than it looks like. In many variation, white seems to simply play "normal London move" but there is a lot of knowledge behind those like move order or something else. As a London system player, i like to play these because there is not a lot of theory compared to other system like Kings-Indian or Grünfeld. I think that ...


1

We all start as beginners, as we all start on a small bicycle - not driving a car. The Colle or the London are good places to start and learn how and what along with some wins. As we grow and mature as chess players, then we can move on to more challenging or "sharp" openings. Ones that fit our chess personality. Some past grandmasters were attacking ...


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