53

I feel like you somewhat misunderstand the concept of a time control. The clock is a part of the game. If you are up a piece in a complicated position with five seconds left on the clock that may well be a losing position for you. Sure, the engine may show you +4, but the clock is an important part, especially in blitz. Importantly, if you spent all your ...


25

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


23

Imagine a variation of chess without the rules about check and checkmate, where a player wins simply when he captures his opponent's king. In this variation, Kxd5 loses the game to exd5. Turns out, that's more or less how real chess works. The objective is to capture the opponent's king. If your king is under attack, you must deal with that threat. If there'...


23

Why is there no rule allowing a player to claim a draw in lonely king endgames? For the simple reason that there is no need. If you are the player with the extra material you can offer a draw and be almost guaranteed that your opponent will accept the offer. If you have an opponent who is ignorant of the rules you can walk away and let your clock time ...


23

Let's look at the title question from the perspective of engine chess, which is more objective in the sense that you can get two engines to play tens of thousands of games against each other at whatever time control you desire. If you look at the latest season of the unofficial world computer chess championship, you'll find that the strongest engine is ...


18

Those are just the rules of the game. You could absolutely try to make the case that moving into check in such a situation should be legal, but playing by those rules wouldn't be chess anymore (it would be some variant). You could also ask why stalemate is a draw and not a win, even though the latter result would make more sense in a real battle. These are ...


18

I will answer from a different perspective: why Racing Kings (RK) has a rule to allow black a chance to draw, and why the same logic doesn't apply to chess. What is Racing Kings (RK)? Background for those unfamiliar with RK: Both sides start with all pieces (no pawns), arranged on the first 2 ranks of the chessboard, white on the right, black on the left. ...


18

Because not having it would result in some perverse incentives. In particular, in any game where a draw is an acceptable outcome, the optimal strategy without flag drops being losses would be to never make a move and simply wait for the flag. With any partial approach like you propose, the optimal strategy would instead be to try to force such a situation (...


16

It is not a drawn position according to the rules, since there is sufficient mating material. It may be a draw from the point of view of endgame theory, but given players who make lots of mistakes, it wouldn't be all that surprising for one to lose to a tactic. I would let them play until the player who wanted a draw can claim it based on the 50-move rule ...


13

The rules for this and how it works are spelled out in articles 9.3, 9.4 and 9.5 of the FIDE Laws of Chess. They don't mention whether or not you are allowed to check your scoresheet to do this because you are always allowed to check your scoresheet. You would be very foolish to not check your scoresheet first because there are penalties for an incorrect ...


13

No, it was not a draw. For a draw by three-fold repetition, the exact position, and all of the possible moves (castling and en passant, which since en passant can only happen on the move, in essence, it requires a fourth repetition of the position), have to be repeated three times. It was clearly a case of your opponent not really knowing the rules. It ...


12

TL;DR: Claiming draws based on threefold repetition or the fifty-move rule is possible in rapid and blitz games as well. Contrary to RemcoGerlich's answer, it is not strictly necessary to record the moves to be able to claim a draw. Note: This is based on the version of the Laws coming into effect after 1 July, 2017. However, as I am not aware of changes ...


12

First, Carlsen, despite having only the Bishop, WON that game. So it is not about mating material, but about ANY possible mating position, and there was one here. The rule at hand is this: Paragraph 6.9 of the FIDE Laws of Chess state: The game is drawn, if the position is such that the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible ...


12

Since you specifically asked for historical reasons: Think about your two proposed criteria in the context of the year 1800 or 1900. Using engine evaluation is obviously out of the question. So is "asking a better player", because you may often not have one at hand (physically, due to limited means of telecommunication!). Using material count is ...


10

This is a better question than it seems at first glance. Intuitively it seems possible to claim a draw, since the position appears to have occurred three times. However, according to a strict reading of the rules, the position after 4...Ng8 has appeared only for the second time. The relevant clauses are 9.2: [...] Positions are considered the same if ...


9

Yes, sometimes the 50-move rule comes up in grandmaster play. One recent example that comes to mind was the game Ushenina-Girya (Geneva 2013), in which the reigning women's world champion failed to convert a knight-and-bishop checkmate within the required 50 moves, and the game was drawn. So this is a case where it's a theoretical win, but the stronger side ...


9

Except for exceptional circumstances, only three results are considered valid for a chess game (and the corresponding rating change): win, draw or loss. Your suggestion would come with a huge problem: what exactly counts as flagging? How big should your advantage have been for your opponent's victory to not count as a "real" victory? Who should ...


8

It's hard, and I've never seen it done correctly, in the sense that it's the way I was taught it should go: During slow games, once the players are not writing down their moves anymore because they are close to a game control, the arbiter should write down the moves as well to help with reconstructing the game after a flag falls (say to check if the 40th ...


8

No, you cannot claim. In fact your right to claim ends as soon as you touch a piece. Here's what the rules say, emphasis in bold mine: 9.2.1 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by a player having the move, when the same position for at least the third time (not necessarily by a repetition of moves): 9.2.1.1 is about to appear, if he first writes ...


7

UCI chess engines don't offer/accept a draw, nor resign a position. This is the GUI's responsibility. You are welcome to add new uci options (setoption and option) for your engine, but don't expect universe UCI support.


7

It's considered a win because that is what it is by definition from the rules of timed games. When you enter a game you commit to its rules; in this case one of those rules is that the time you have to force mate or other result is constrained by the clock, and you must adapt your strategy to meet that constraint. In the example you have given, you have not ...


6

It's better to let them play it out a bit and ideally only draw once reaching 50 moves. But if one of them is low on time (and their opponent is clearly just trying to flag them) then you should claim the draw.


6

There was a three-times repetition. Note that only the position needs to be repeated, it is not necessary that the moves leading to the position are the same. The position occurred first after move 58, second after move 60 and third at the end of the game.


5

The first point to note that this kind of draw claim only applies when there are no increments. Since digital clocks are almost universal in advanced and normal chess countries it should (I stress "should") rarely arise. Note also that FIDE proposes to ban analogue clocks and insist on increments in FIDE rated tournaments from 2021, so then the problem ...


5

It’s probable that White has some strategic advantage from going first. I never thought of your suggestion to give a losing player a “last-dying blow” might be a solution to this imbalance. Now that I consider it, I think that it would not be desirable. Chess has too many draws anyway. That’s a much greater perceived issue than the white/black question. ...


5

Here is my email conversation with the head of the FIDE Arbiter's Commission, Laurent Freyd. In essence, for now, until they add a clarification, and arbiter would be correct ruling either way. That said, he says that he teaches new arbiters that once the game has ended, they do not go back and change the result after the fact. In other words, they still ...


5

Signed scoresheets matter The other answers go into detail of what would be the correct result of the game. However, that is irrelevant because you say The scoresheet is signed as a loss. And FIDE laws 8.7 state At the conclusion of the game both players shall sign both scoresheets, indicating the result of the game. Even if ...


5

The FIDE Laws of Chess (I'm giving a link to the version in the Arbiter's Handbook because FIDE have Munged their own site) do give a definitive answer but it takes some searching to find. The key appears in the section on the Chess clock! 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his ...


5

It is difficult to say what the exact rules should be if you aren't affiliated with a group that publishes rules for such situations. But I think your actions in this case were reasonable. USCF rule 14H used to state that a player with less than two minutes on the clock (with no delay or increment being used) could make a claim of insufficient losing ...


5

Does this rule stand in major Chess tournaments? This rule applies in all tournaments where FIDE Laws of Chess take precedence. So, yes, it applies in all major tournaments including USCF and all federations which are affiliated to FIDE. If it appears to not work on a particular website then that is likely a bug on the platform and it is worth reporting to ...


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