25

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


16

It is not a drawn position according to the rules, since there is sufficient mating material. It may be a draw from the point of view of endgame theory, but given players who make lots of mistakes, it wouldn't be all that surprising for one to lose to a tactic. I would let them play until the player who wanted a draw can claim it based on the 50-move rule ...


13

The rules for this and how it works are spelled out in articles 9.3, 9.4 and 9.5 of the FIDE Laws of Chess. They don't mention whether or not you are allowed to check your scoresheet to do this because you are always allowed to check your scoresheet. You would be very foolish to not check your scoresheet first because there are penalties for an incorrect ...


10

TL;DR: Claiming draws based on threefold repetition or the fifty-move rule is possible in rapid and blitz games as well. Contrary to RemcoGerlich's answer, it is not strictly necessary to record the moves to be able to claim a draw. Note: This is based on the version of the Laws coming into effect after 1 July, 2017. However, as I am not aware of changes ...


8

No, you cannot claim. In fact your right to claim ends as soon as you touch a piece. Here's what the rules say, emphasis in bold mine: 9.2.1 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by a player having the move, when the same position for at least the third time (not necessarily by a repetition of moves): 9.2.1.1 is about to appear, if he ...


8

This is a better question than it seems at first glance. Intuitively it seems possible to claim a draw, since the position appears to have occurred three times. However, according to a strict reading of the rules, the position after 4...Ng8 has appeared only for the second time. The relevant clauses are 9.2: [...] Positions are considered the same if ...


8

This is a dead draw. There are no sensible piece sacrifices for either side. There is no plan that isn't easily parried (Black could gang up on the a5-pawn with Qd8 and Bc7, but white just doubles the rooks on a1 and a2. White could try to invade with the knight to b6 and d5, but black would just go Bxa4 when the knight turns up on a4.) Black isn't ...


7

Yes, sometimes the 50-move rule comes up in grandmaster play. One recent example that comes to mind was the game Ushenina-Girya (Geneva 2013), in which the reigning women's world champion failed to convert a knight-and-bishop checkmate within the required 50 moves, and the game was drawn. So this is a case where it's a theoretical win, but the stronger side ...


7

It's hard, and I've never seen it done correctly, in the sense that it's the way I was taught it should go: During slow games, once the players are not writing down their moves anymore because they are close to a game control, the arbiter should write down the moves as well to help with reconstructing the game after a flag falls (say to check if the 40th ...


6

There was a three-times repetition. Note that only the position needs to be repeated, it is not necessary that the moves leading to the position are the same. The position occurred first after move 58, second after move 60 and third at the end of the game.


6

UCI chess engines don't offer/accept a draw, nor resign a position. This is the GUI's responsibility. You are welcome to add new uci options (setoption and option) for your engine, but don't expect universe UCI support.


6

It's better to let them play it out a bit and ideally only draw once reaching 50 moves. But if one of them is low on time (and their opponent is clearly just trying to flag them) then you should claim the draw.


5

Signed scoresheets matter The other answers go into detail of what would be the correct result of the game. However, that is irrelevant because you say The scoresheet is signed as a loss. And FIDE laws 8.7 state At the conclusion of the game both players shall sign both scoresheets, indicating the result of the game. Even if ...


5

The FIDE Laws of Chess (I'm giving a link to the version in the Arbiter's Handbook because FIDE have Munged their own site) do give a definitive answer but it takes some searching to find. The key appears in the section on the Chess clock! 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his ...


5

It is difficult to say what the exact rules should be if you aren't affiliated with a group that publishes rules for such situations. But I think your actions in this case were reasonable. USCF rule 14H used to state that a player with less than two minutes on the clock (with no delay or increment being used) could make a claim of insufficient losing ...


5

The first point to note that this kind of draw claim only applies when there are no increments. Since digital clocks are almost universal in advanced and normal chess countries it should (I stress "should") rarely arise. Note also that FIDE proposes to ban analogue clocks and insist on increments in FIDE rated tournaments from 2021, so then the problem ...


4

Well, let's look at the FIDE rules: Yes, your opponent may claim a draw even if it's not his move. He should then stop the clock (rule 6.12b): A player may stop the chessclock only in order to seek the arbiter’s assistance but, of course, it will be his word against yours that he did that before you released your rook, because checkmate immediately ends ...


4

Yes you're absolutely allowed to look at the score-sheet. What you're not allowed to do is make special symbols/notes on the scoresheet to remind you of things. But that's non-applicable here.


4

Here is my email conversation with the head of the FIDE Arbiter's Commission, Laurent Freyd. In essence, for now, until they add a clarification, and arbiter would be correct ruling either way. That said, he says that he teaches new arbiters that once the game has ended, they do not go back and change the result after the fact. In other words, they still ...


3

Relevant FIDE rule, appendix G.5: If Article G.4 [a player may claim extra time for both sides] does not apply and the player having the move has less than two minutes left on his clock, he may claim a draw before his flag falls. He shall summon the arbiter and may stop the chessclock (see Article 6.12 b). He may claim on the basis that his opponent ...


3

In short: Art. 5 lists situations that end the game immediately. Checkmate, stalemate, resignation, draw by agreement, dead position. Those end the game even if it is not noticed. All other ends need a valid claim (2nd irregular move) or at least someone who observes it (flag fall). And that is the case here: Art. 9.6 says that the game is drawn in the cases ...


3

Mate ends the game immediately, but the mating move must be made, not just written down. If the player only writes the move down and claims a draw in the correct way, it's a draw (but I doubt it'll ever happen in practice).


2

9.1.b.1 A player wishing to offer a draw shall do so after having made a move on the chessboard and before pressing his clock. An offer at any other time during play is still valid but Article 11.5 must be considered. No conditions can be attached to the offer. In both cases the offer cannot be withdrawn and remains valid until the opponent accepts ...


2

No, checkmate or resignation ends the game. 9.6 says that if you have 75 moves or a 5-fold repetition, that the game is automatically drawn, and that no one needs to claim it. That said, checkmate still ends the game, so if that happens on the 75th move, it is over. You still need to realize that you have made the appropriate number of moves, and if you ...


1

Apparently this has occurred in real life and the FIDE Arbiters Commission has delivered their verdict in an article in their twice yearly FIDE Arbiters' Magazine. In the September 2018 edition it reports on an occurrence in the "First Saturday tournament in Hungary" in May 2018 in a game between IM Akshat Khamparia (IND) and IM Bo Li (CHN). This is how it ...


1

Of course it is very hard to remember how many moves have passed. Is white allowed to look at the scoresheet and count the number of moves during the game? In a serious tournament game, you would stop the clocks and ask the arbiter to come and check your scoresheets. I remember there was a recent incident between Russian GM Alexandra Kosteniuk against ...


1

This is a funny situation - in a FIDE tournament, it depends on whether you're talking about White or Black. To claim a draw in FIDE tournaments the procedure is as follows: 1) Write down the move you are planning to make that will result in a three-fold repetition. Do NOT make the move. 2) Call over the arbiter and explain what move you're about to make, ...


1

In reference to Chessbrain's answer. I guess this will also answer your Question. Black's Bishop is not bad as it is the only minor piece that can attack the only vulnerable white pawn on a5, where as white can not defend it with any of its minor pieces. Knight has no square to defend it, And the other minor piece is white bishop. (Although, The rooks are ...


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