23

According to the FIDE rules, 6.6 At the time determined for the start of the game White’s clock is started. In over the board chess, it's usually Black who does this (you can't have an arbiter start all clocks simultaneously) after the players shake hands and wish each other good luck. If White isn't present, Black may start the clock anyway at the ...


19

The relevant section from the rules would be Article 7.4.1: If a player displaces one or more pieces, he shall re-establish the correct position in his own time. The rules do not specify a certain procedure, but what I have seen happening in practice is: Player A knocks a piece over on his opponent's time. Player B is now allowed to press the clock to ...


11

I feel this is legal. I'm using FIDE rules. This is the rule that describes what happens with a capture: 3.1.1 If a piece moves to a square occupied by an opponent’s piece the latter is captured and removed from the chessboard as part of the same move. There's nothing there about what happens to the captured pieces, other than they are removed from the ...


10

¹ Don't tell him. His clock, his time-management. Especially if something's at stake. Pressing the clock requires incredibly low skill, but do you tell your opponent every time he blunders, or is it just part of good play to never, ever make them ? ¹ I feel like an opinion is under-represented over here, so let's see what's it worth :)


10

Per FIDE rules 6.10a and 6.10b (I am including the latter since it is so closely related in that it can require the arbiter to adjust the times based on judgment): 6.10 a. Every indication given by the clocks is considered to be conclusive in the absence of any evident defect. A chess clock with an evident defect shall be replaced. The ...


9

Section 5.5 of the FIDE handbook lists the following approved clocks: 5.5. The electronic chess clocks endorsed by the FIDE 5.5.1. DGT XL (year 2007) 5.5.2. DGT 2010 (year 2010) 5.5.3. Silver Timer (year 2007) 5.5.4. Sistemco (year 2009) 5.5.5. DGT 3000 (year 2014) 5.5.6. CE Clock (year 2017) 5.5.7. KK9908 Clock (year 2017)


7

There is still a pawn on a2, and it wasn't touched. The queen can only be on a1 due to a promotion, but you don't state the pawn was ever touched, and you say that nothing more than that happened. Now the puzzle becomes extremely technical, and I don't think the FIDE laws are precise enough to decide. Of course we're talking about 6.9 Except where one of ...


6

Theoretically the situation is very simple, whichever happens first stands. In practice it is often difficult to determine what happened first though. If you insist that both the flag falls and the mating move is made at exactly the same time (the same nanosecond say) then my answer would be that this can never happen. It is as in statistics - the ...


6

This was more of a problem with the earlier generation (early 2000's) of digital clocks. One of them had a fault which meant that if you gave it a bit of a smack then the battery might jiggle inside, momentarily interrupting the electricity supply and it would reset. The post 2010 clocks don't have this problem, probably they just fitted a small capacitor ...


5

Its a matter of opinion, and much more likely to occur at the beginner or amateur levels of chess. I believe it is best to show the high levels of sportsmanship and notify them immediately for the first couple of times they forget to press there clock. If they continue to forget to press the clock, start by waiting 1 minute, followed by 2 and 3 etc. … If it'...


5

Nothing gets rounded internally. If you are programming a chess clock, then maintain the time according to whatever the machine precision is on your machine without rounding. Some clocks have tenth seconds on their display, but that doesn't mean that they're altering the fundamental increments of time as compared to different clocks. If A begins and spends ...


5

Best Solution: chessclock.org - add the website to the home screen on your phone and tilt the phone to the side Added in the comments: chessclock.iphonemarks.com Original suggestions: skakur.dk ksloan.net/chessclock


4

There was a game where Korchnoi was completely lost and deliberately ran himself into time trouble so that the opponent would try to take advantage of it rather than playing the merits of the position. I believe it worked and he turned the game around. Ref : http://en.chessbase.com/post/clean-tricks-and-creative-attacks


4

Well, let's look at the FIDE rules: Yes, your opponent may claim a draw even if it's not his move. He should then stop the clock (rule 6.12b): A player may stop the chessclock only in order to seek the arbiter’s assistance but, of course, it will be his word against yours that he did that before you released your rook, because checkmate immediately ends ...


4

It is not a typical use case, so you will definitely want to make sure that the clock you're purchasing does have a count-up mode (or is analog, in which case, you probably want to make sure it is quiet). The Chronos digital clock does have a couple of count-up modes (UP-1 and UP-2).


4

Yes, I am saying that releasing the queen on a1 is not enough to be considered having made the move! 4.7 explicitly states that: Thus, the "cannot be moved to another square on this move". Thus, the "possible series of legal moves." from 6.9 HAS to start with this move (any other move could not be considered legal, as it would conflict with 4.7) and ...


3

The exhibitor usually gets more time. Not really to compensate for the time walking from board to board takes, but because he potentially has all of the clocks running at the same time! The most famous clock simultaneous exhibitions were the ones in which Kasparov took on national teams, including those of the Czech Republic and Israel. According to this ...


3

If it's in a tournament, you're under no obligation to tell them. They'll learn quickly enough through hard experience. I would liken that to telling them to take back a bad move. In a casual game, good sportsmanship would favor continuing to make some indication that they hadn't punched their clock, but that would be up to you. And I believe you're right ...


3

It appears that the Chronus GX clock does not have a count up mode. While the normal one does, as you have mentioned, it seems that the GX doesn’t. I found this video on how to set up a count on the normal one. It cites pages 35-36 of the manual on how to do this. As expected, the online PDF of the manual corresponds to the video’s given information. My ...


3

Wikipedia Fast Chess Before the advent of digital clocks, five minutes per side was the standard for blitz or speed chess. Before the introduction of chess clocks in the mid-1950s chess club "rapid transit" tournaments had a referee who every ten seconds called out. The Washington Divan (2445 15th St. NW) had regular weekly games and used a ...


3

I direct a chess club in a library where many of our members play quick chess. They press the clocks softly, and there is no noise. If one is slamming the timer, then yes, I agree, that could be disturbing. But just let everyone know that that's unacceptable, and that should solve the problem. Also I think there might be a misunderstanding on the shop ...


3

I've never heard of any digital ones that do, but the old analog clocks count up, of course. Interesting idea.


3

Well that depends, if your talking about a game as in chess then no. If your opponent is in zugzwang he may deliberately allow his time to expire so that his opponent may move and likewise the opponent would let their time expire to put his opponent back in zugzwang. Basically the game would go on and on... With no one making any moves. However if you are ...


3

Well, the solution to the first part of the puzzle is


3

https://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.html?id=171&view=article 6.11 a. If both flags have fallen and it is impossible to establish which flag fell first then: the game shall continue if this occurs in any period of the game except the last period. b. the game is drawn if this occurs in the period of a game in which all remaining moves must be completed. ...


3

Is this the correct behaviour? Yes it is. Consider the FIDE Rating Regulations - 1. Rate of Play 1.1 For a game to be rated each player must have the following minimum periods in which to complete all the moves, assuming the game lasts 60 moves. Where at least one of the players in the game has a rating 2200 or higher, each player must have a ...


3

I do not know what FIDE and their rules are, but for our local games I would just push the clock and tell the other player to put all the pieces on the board properly before any of my time gets used up at all. Unless it was a FIDE match AND FIDE rules specified a specific action then I would not be waiting around wondering if an arbiter is watching. Too ...


3

Well I learned way more than I wanted to know about other considerations than mere timing. This table may be collapsed into a long string of text someone please edit if that happens Cost Size Accuracy Precision Ease of use Color Battery Life Reliability Ruggedness Toggle method maintenance required Flag display Analog/digital Shape Aesthetic Ease of ...


3

They seem to have just finished the process literally YESTERDAY, but the new clocks have not made it into that list. You would think that there would be a set of criteria that a company would have to meet, and if met, then they would get approval, but it appears to be more of a "money thing" than a "this-clock-is-good" thing. I remembered looking for that ...


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