23

According to the FIDE rules, 6.6 At the time determined for the start of the game White’s clock is started. In over the board chess, it's usually Black who does this (you can't have an arbiter start all clocks simultaneously) after the players shake hands and wish each other good luck. If White isn't present, Black may start the clock anyway at the ...


20

In my personal opinion, if you have noticed that your opponent has forgotten to hit their clock, the unwritten rules of good sportsmanship dictate that you should advise your opponent of such. It can become distracting to both players, though, if you have to do this more than twice. So the real question comes down to the legal technicalities. Are you even ...


17

We are all humans and humans make mistakes. Including forgetting to press the clock when playing chess. Even top players. Personally, I was very impressed when I've read what Botvinnik did in such a situation. The following is my free translation from Russian: In Nottingham (Nottingham tournament, 1936) I didn't make any difference between my former ...


11

There is an article by Geurt Gijssen on Chess Cafe (4th question asked) that touches on the event that the clock's initial time control being incorrectly configured, but only noticed much later in the game. He quotes the FIDE rules: The Laws of Chess cannot cover all possible situations that may arise during a game, nor can they regulate all ...


11

I feel this is legal. I'm using FIDE rules. This is the rule that describes what happens with a capture: 3.1.1 If a piece moves to a square occupied by an opponent’s piece the latter is captured and removed from the chessboard as part of the same move. There's nothing there about what happens to the captured pieces, other than they are removed from the ...


10

¹ Don't tell him. His clock, his time-management. Especially if something's at stake. Pressing the clock requires incredibly low skill, but do you tell your opponent every time he blunders, or is it just part of good play to never, ever make them ? ¹ I feel like an opinion is under-represented over here, so let's see what's it worth :)


10

Per FIDE rules 6.10a and 6.10b (I am including the latter since it is so closely related in that it can require the arbiter to adjust the times based on judgment): 6.10 a. Every indication given by the clocks is considered to be conclusive in the absence of any evident defect. A chess clock with an evident defect shall be replaced. The ...


8

In the bughouse variant a situation can definitely arise in which it makes sense to stall for time. If I'm facing checkmate next move on my board no matter what I do, then if my partner's opponent has less time on the clock than I do, I should just sit tight and hope that my partner can win on his board before my time runs out. (And if my partner's opponent ...


7

Ed Dean has an excellent answer about most cases (and even touches on what I'm discussing), but there is one situation that I can think of where stalling is an excellent idea: This mostly only applies to stronger players (2300+), but the information is good... Sometimes it is very useful to spend a lot of time on an early opening move to try to confuse the ...


6

Theoretically the situation is very simple, whichever happens first stands. In practice it is often difficult to determine what happened first though. If you insist that both the flag falls and the mating move is made at exactly the same time (the same nanosecond say) then my answer would be that this can never happen. It is as in statistics - the ...


6

There is still a pawn on a2, and it wasn't touched. The queen can only be on a1 due to a promotion, but you don't state the pawn was ever touched, and you say that nothing more than that happened. Now the puzzle becomes extremely technical, and I don't think the FIDE laws are precise enough to decide. Of course we're talking about 6.9 Except where one ...


6

This was more of a problem with the earlier generation (early 2000's) of digital clocks. One of them had a fault which meant that if you gave it a bit of a smack then the battery might jiggle inside, momentarily interrupting the electricity supply and it would reset. The post 2010 clocks don't have this problem, probably they just fitted a small capacitor ...


5

Its a matter of opinion, and much more likely to occur at the beginner or amateur levels of chess. I believe it is best to show the high levels of sportsmanship and notify them immediately for the first couple of times they forget to press there clock. If they continue to forget to press the clock, start by waiting 1 minute, followed by 2 and 3 etc. … If it'...


5

I just saw you asked this couple of months back but adding my answer if others are looking for something in this price-range. Do you have an iPhone? There are chess-clock apps which are pretty good. This is only for home games, as you don't want the other player scratching too much on your iPhone screen. You should also search eBay. They are the best bet ...


5

Website that works on mobile: chessclock.iphonemarks.com Original suggestions: skakur.dk ksloan.net/chessclock chessclock.org created by this user on chess.com.


4

Bluetooth supports distance of less than 30 feet, or 10 meters, and 802.11b is roughly up to 200 feet, though both distances depend on a number of factors; mention Wifi since it's possible that might be a better solution for your needs. Here's the DGT manual for "Connecting your Bluetooth board to your Computer", which might provide additional information of ...


4

Overall, I don't see any reason to do this unless you want to annoy your opponent. If your opponent is advanced, I think you would just be wasting time, especially if you think your opponent is going to be psychologically tricked into making some sort of blunder. If your opponent is a beginner, this may have some psychological effect as it your opponent ...


4

There was a game where Korchnoi was completely lost and deliberately ran himself into time trouble so that the opponent would try to take advantage of it rather than playing the merits of the position. I believe it worked and he turned the game around. Ref : http://en.chessbase.com/post/clean-tricks-and-creative-attacks


4

It is not a typical use case, so you will definitely want to make sure that the clock you're purchasing does have a count-up mode (or is analog, in which case, you probably want to make sure it is quiet). The Chronos digital clock does have a couple of count-up modes (UP-1 and UP-2).


4

Well, let's look at the FIDE rules: Yes, your opponent may claim a draw even if it's not his move. He should then stop the clock (rule 6.12b): A player may stop the chessclock only in order to seek the arbiter’s assistance but, of course, it will be his word against yours that he did that before you released your rook, because checkmate immediately ends ...


4

Nothing gets rounded internally. If you are programming a chess clock, then maintain the time according to whatever the machine precision is on your machine without rounding. Some clocks have tenth seconds on their display, but that doesn't mean that they're altering the fundamental increments of time as compared to different clocks. If A begins and spends ...


3

Well that depends, if your talking about a game as in chess then no. If your opponent is in zugzwang he may deliberately allow his time to expire so that his opponent may move and likewise the opponent would let their time expire to put his opponent back in zugzwang. Basically the game would go on and on... With no one making any moves. However if you are ...


3

I've never heard of any digital ones that do, but the old analog clocks count up, of course. Interesting idea.


3

If it's in a tournament, you're under no obligation to tell them. They'll learn quickly enough through hard experience. I would liken that to telling them to take back a bad move. In a casual game, good sportsmanship would favor continuing to make some indication that they hadn't punched their clock, but that would be up to you. And I believe you're right ...


3

The exhibitor usually gets more time. Not really to compensate for the time walking from board to board takes, but because he potentially has all of the clocks running at the same time! The most famous clock simultaneous exhibitions were the ones in which Kasparov took on national teams, including those of the Czech Republic and Israel. According to this ...


3

I direct a chess club in a library where many of our members play quick chess. They press the clocks softly, and there is no noise. If one is slamming the timer, then yes, I agree, that could be disturbing. But just let everyone know that that's unacceptable, and that should solve the problem. Also I think there might be a misunderstanding on the shop ...


3

Wikipedia Fast Chess Before the advent of digital clocks, five minutes per side was the standard for blitz or speed chess. Before the introduction of chess clocks in the mid-1950s chess club "rapid transit" tournaments had a referee who every ten seconds called out. The Washington Divan (2445 15th St. NW) had regular weekly games and used ...


3

It appears that the Chronus GX clock does not have a count up mode. While the normal one does, as you have mentioned, it seems that the GX doesn’t. I found this video on how to set up a count on the normal one. It cites pages 35-35 of the manual on how to do this. As expected, the online PDF of the manual corresponds to the video’s given information. My ...


3

Yes, I am saying that releasing the queen on a1 is not enough to be considered having made the move! 4.7 explicitly states that: Thus, the "cannot be moved to another square on this move". Thus, the "possible series of legal moves." from 6.9 HAS to start with this move (any other move could not be considered legal, as it would conflict with 4.7) and ...


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