50

Initial Analysis White is clearly in a dire situation, since Black is threatening mate in one on either h7 or h8 if White doesn't do anything. But the White king can't move move nor can White get rid of any of the pawns that surround the king. White's rook, the only White piece, is too far away to do anything. The move 1. Ra8? to try and stop 1... Qh8# fails ...


34

Welcome to Chess Stack Exchange. I believe you're doing well here. It is surely a checkmate. Probably the website isn't programmed that way to recognize that move. But, as per your question, this is clearly a checkmate that resembles the one-rook-mate pattern.


32

One amazing game I know that ends in a pawn mate in one called The Polish Immortal in which Black sacrifices all four minor pieces to win the game! The pawn does a double-step to give the mate. [Title "Glucksberg-Miguel Najdorf, Warsaw Poland, 1929, The Polish Immortal"] [FEN ""] 1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 d5 5.e3 c6 6.Bd3 Bd6 7.O-O ...


31

I want to offer a semi-realistic example. I think I have seen something like this in a game by masters in some book, but of course I cannot recall where. But this is something that at least can be realistically missed in calculations from far away. [FEN "6k1/5ppp/6r1/3b4/4r3/8/1Q5P/1R5K w - - 0 1"] White just gives a back rank mate, right? :) ...


30

No, this is not possible. for example move the piece, don't press the clock and then resign? In particular, that loophole is explicitly covered by the rules: 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his opponent’s clock (that is to say, he shall press his clock). This “completes” the ...


29

White to play checkmates in 2 with 1 d4+! exd3 e.p. 2 Qbf4#. Black to play cannot checkmate in 2 but should win after Bxf7. 7r/1p3Q1p/2q5/3bk3/1Q2p3/2P5/r2P2PP/2KR4 w - - 0 1 1. d4+! exd3 2. Qbf4


24

This is really a question for fairly low-rated players, who tend to play things out to the bitter end. If you are reasonably strong, the only reason your opponent does not resign earlier is that he thought you played such a good game that he allows you to execute the checkmate (I have done this), or thinks that the final position is beautiful, and saw it ...


24

Probably more often than people realize. There have been several notable instances where GMs (even world champions) have missed simple mates in one. From my own experience, when I analyze my games the engine frequently will point out some ridiculous 25 move forced mate. In a game, I'm not going to take the time to calculate something like that out if I have ...


23

Imagine a variation of chess without the rules about check and checkmate, where a player wins simply when he captures his opponent's king. In this variation, Kxd5 loses the game to exd5. Turns out, that's more or less how real chess works. The objective is to capture the opponent's king. If your king is under attack, you must deal with that threat. If there'...


21

The sidebar says "1. Qe7# (1. Qc8#) (1. Qb8#)". In case you're not yet familiar with chess notation, this means: 1​. (White's move number 1) Q (the Queen) e7 (moves to space E7) # (and checkmates.) After that, your move "(1. Qc8#)" is highlighted in red, indicating it was not one of the answers they were looking for. But note that it is ...


19

Sure it's possible, in fact it's possible that this kind of "inevitability" happens earlier in the game, with many more moves to go until mate. See example here. [FEN "K1k5/P1Pp4/1p1P4/8/p7/P2P4/8/8 w - - 0 1"] [Event "White to play and win"] 1. d4 b5 2. d5 b4 3. axb4 a3 4. b5 a2 5. b6 a1=Q 6. b7#


18

I will answer from a different perspective: why Racing Kings (RK) has a rule to allow black a chance to draw, and why the same logic doesn't apply to chess. What is Racing Kings (RK)? Background for those unfamiliar with RK: Both sides start with all pieces (no pawns), arranged on the first 2 ranks of the chessboard, white on the right, black on the left. ...


18

Those are just the rules of the game. You could absolutely try to make the case that moving into check in such a situation should be legal, but playing by those rules wouldn't be chess anymore (it would be some variant). You could also ask why stalemate is a draw and not a win, even though the latter result would make more sense in a real battle. These are ...


18

It really depends on what counts as a missed checkmate. In Blitz we occasionally see a missed mate in 1. In slower games, mates in a few moves are rarelly missed. But the problem is that sometimes long mate sequences will be "intentionally missed", as the player will go for a solid advatange that guarantees victory rather than calculate a 15-move ...


15

Kh7 would also result in mate due to Qh5. So both moves are equally "good" Kf8 Rg8 maybe was seen as less obvious than Qh5.


14

In the general case K+N vs K+P is of course a draw - or a win for the pawn if it can promote unhindered. There is however a famous construction were the knight can force a mate against a king stuck in front of its own well-advanced rook pawn: [fen "8/3N4/8/8/8/p7/k7/2K5 w - - 0 1"] 1.Nc5 Ka1 2.Kc2 Ka2 3.Nd3 Ka1 4.Nc1 a2 5.Nb3# There are many ...


13

It's going to be hard for any position to be "natural" if the king is out and roaming about, so I presume that you mean that the position must be legal. Also, as far as I understand it, the king may only teleport in a checkmate position, and not while in check, because otherwise it would be nigh impossible to give a mate. Firstly, it is entirely ...


13

Just for the record, the longest win in this endgame is 7 moves: [FEN "8/8/8/8/p7/8/N7/k1K5 w - - 0 1"] 1. Nb4 a3 2. Nc2+ Ka2 3. Nd4 Ka1 4. Kc2 Ka2 5. Ne2 Ka1 6. Nc1 a2 7. Nb3# The idea in this position (and other similar positions) is to stalemate the king in the corner; that forces a pawn move and when the pawn reaches a2, you'll need to have ...


13

The longest K + Q + Q vs K mate whilst maintaining optimality is a mate in 4.


13

[FEN "kq6/8/K7/PQ6/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Qb7+ (1... Qa7#) 2. Qxb7# Black could mate with 1...Qa7# or lose with 1...Qb7#, when White's only legal reply is 2. Qxb7#.


12

First, Carlsen, despite having only the Bishop, WON that game. So it is not about mating material, but about ANY possible mating position, and there was one here. The rule at hand is this: Paragraph 6.9 of the FIDE Laws of Chess state: The game is drawn, if the position is such that the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible ...


12

1.d8=N+ is necessary to avoid losing, but it also gives White a forced win after 1...Kb8 (1...Kc8 runs into 2.Ra8#) 2.Nc6+ Kb7 (2...Kc8 3.Ra8+ transposes) 3.Ra7+ Kc8 4.Ra8+ Kb7 5.Rb8#.


11

There's nothing impolite about delivering checkmate in the same fashion that you'd make any other move. If anything, e.g. in formal games and when there's no risk of losing on time, it might be considered bad etiquette by the losing player to continue playing on in a completely hopeless position, instead, players usually resign before the checkmate occurs (...


11

Because he is losing the Rh8, and at that level, that is an EASY win. It is also worse than that as mate is coming in a few moves. Even without the almost immediate mate, being down a pawn and an exchange is a lot of material. By the way, although black did not take it, white did offer a queen sac on move 24.Qg7, but had it been taken, a new queen would ...


10

First, kids and adults, the rules are the same, so there is no difference there. What you are asking about goes beyond just the rules: It comes down to intent. Whether an adult, or kid, there could be an erroneous claim; and if it is really just that, then the TD should just fix it assuming it is caught in time. It is just a mistake. Other types of ...


10

I checked with Stockfish and indeed there is no normal mate in one for White, and there isn't a mate in one for Black either. So this obviously a trick/joke problem. The trick is this: What last move of Black would allow a mate in one? Solution: Explanation:


10

Possible queen and any other piece The queen can on its own push the king to the edge of the board by following it a knight-distance away and making use of zugzwang. Once on the edge, it is easy to bring the second piece and mate with the queen in front of the king. The only exception would be if the second piece is a pawn on the next to last row Example ...


9

Checkmate ends the game immediately, so there is no need to press the clock after it. Best is to play it as a normal move, look at your opponent and usually they'll shake hands. You can say "checkmate" as you move or if he doesn't immediately realize. Just don't overdo it :-) Sometimes you mistakenly think it's checkmate. I once did (in extreme time ...


9

It was illegal to move the queen here (and any piece in general) if that move put the king in check from another of the opponents pieces. If the player tried to move the queen here they have to put it back and make a legal move. Note that in some nonstandard variation most usually of the blitz speed type the special rules allow you to take the king and ...


9

A beautiful, more recent, game between Svilder and Carlsen: [Title "Svidler - Carlsen, GRENKE Chess Classic, 2019"] [FEN ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 e5 4.Bc4 Be7 5.d3 d6 6.Nd2 Nf6 7.Nf1 Nd7 8.Nd5 Nb6 9.Nxb6 axb6 10.c3 O-O 11.Ne3 Bg5 12.O-O Kh8 13.a3 f5 14.Nxf5 Bxc1 15.Rxc1 Bxf5 16.exf5 d5 17.Ba2 Rxf5 18.Qg4 Rf6 19.f4 exf4 20.Qg5 Qf8 21.Qxd5 Rd8 22.Qf3 Ne5 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible