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7

Yes, here is an example: [FEN "K4nqk/6q1/8/8/6P1/6Q1/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qh3+ Nh7#


0

This answer is based on a similar question and its answer. Disclaimer: The sequence is not forced; the question title asks for forced sequence, but not the question itself. Some other answers, such as this, do not deal with forced sequences either. If you allow the initial position to have promoted pieces, the longest known sequence is 54 half-moves. One can ...


3

For a human, winning Q/R against a computer is more difficult than expected. Indeed, the key is not checking itself but avoiding that the rook checks the king away. Of course, the best concrete strategy in some position may giving some checks first, just to lead the Q to the correct field without losing a tempo. Note that in the final position the Q controls ...


3

According to the current FIDE Laws of Chess: 3.9.1 The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are constrained from moving to the square occupied by the king because they would then leave or place their own king in check. 3.9.2 No piece can be moved that will either expose the king of the ...


3

En passant also doesn't work. You can, potentially, discover two checks, one because the capturing pawn moves off a file and one because the removed pawn unblocks a diagonal. However, you can't simultaneously discover a check via the removed pawn and give check with the capturing pawn, because the only two squares threatened by the capturing pawn are a ...


1

No. As you said, when you make a move, you're uncovering at most one extra line (say a diagonal or file) to attack a king. If your one move uncovered two different lines that attack a king, that would mathematically mean that the king would have to be at the intersection of these two lines. Thus, your king was previously on the square at the intersection of ...


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