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13

The center is the crossroads of the board. Controlling it will give you access to every other part of the board. At the same time, it will drive a wedge in the opponent's position that hampers communication between king and queen side. Control of the center is usually a decisive advantage in your favor; unless your opponent has heavy compensation (e.g. more ...


8

This is a hard question to answer because you take a very broad, abstract, historical concept (the existence of "schools" in chess, with a particular list that I've definitely not seen before) and then you connect that with a very concrete, peculiar little thing (the moves Houdini suggests in the opening position if it doesn't have an opening book). I'll ...


7

Let me start from top to bottom: It is important to play e4 or d4 to 'control the center'. Myth or reality? Myth. Well, there are two premises in the question itself: 1) That e4 or d4 'controls the center'. When you play 1.e4/d4 you do not control the center, you physically occupy it. To control the center, you will need more than a single pawn ...


7

There isn't that much difference in strength between having a pawn on e4 or one on e3 (usually accompanied by one on d4); there are pros and cons to both (and a pawn on e3 can still go to e4, but not the other way around). The difference is between putting them there on move 1. Let's take a look at the effects of 1.e4 and 1.e3, concentrating on the actual ...


7

Controlling the center allows you to move your pieces to the other side of the board easier. Further, some pieces (especially knights) have more moves if they're in the center of the board. A knight in the center has 8 moves. A knight on the rim has 4, 3, or 2.


6

Since, you're already familiar with the King's Indian Attack and are looking for a solid line, I recommend playing the Nimzowitsch Larsen Attack, by first playing 1. Nf3. Normally, the Larsen Attack starts directly with 1. b3, but after 1...e5, I wouldn't describe the resulting positions as "solid" for White, but rather more "dynamic". [FEN "rnbqkbnr/...


5

Yes. The main reason to move your d- and e-pawns forward is to control the center with them. The fact that they allow the bishops to be developed is secondary. (Often bishops are fianchettoed anyway.)


5

The pawn advance reduces the potential, what is done cannot be undone and Black uses the information to set up accordingly. This is probably the broadest and most general explanation. In the end, however, it may turn out to be a matter of taste or fashion.


5

First, I agree that f6 is both weakening and a waste of time. The real crux of the matter is that in most double-king pawn openings, white tries to play d4 and after the trade e5xd4, he tries to outpost a N on d5, which exerts great pressure on black. If black can play d5, and I do not agree that he has the initiative there after the better d3, he does get ...


4

Do Hypermodern techniques work? Certainly. Hypermodern openings include the Pirc, Nimzo-Indian, Grunfeld, the Catalan Opening, King's Indian Defense, Alekhine's Defense, and the Queen's Indian Defense. There are probably a dozen others. These are commonly played by GMs, especially the Grunfeld and KID. Surely this is proof enough that the Hypermodern ...


4

Controlling the center is very important, for to move pieces from one side of the board to the other, the pieces need to go through the center. While this may seem to have little effect in the beginning of the game, the impact in the middlegame is immense.


4

Once you control the center attack the enemy king and give checkmate! However it's much easier said than done. Normally there are two ways you can win control of the center and how you go about trying to win in each case is different. 1) You both fought for the center by moving pawns there but you managed to swap off or divert his pawn or pawns and now ...


4

The hypermoderns thought that pawn centers were weaknesses subject to attack. Thus came about defenses designed to "entice" center building while developing a way to undermine them. See defenses like the Alekhine or the King's Indian where this is exactly what is done. This is still an undecided question, although current theory believes that occupying the ...


4

f6 is a shockingly bad move which badly weakens black's kingside and does nothing for his development. d4 would take advantage of this and keep the initiative. c3 is a weak move which gives black the time he needs to strike in the now reinforced center and justify his previous bad play. Black can play d5 and suddenly it is black who has the initiative. For ...


4

The moves ...Nge7 and ...f6 slow down Black's development and he will need a few tempi to castle. Meanwhile, White is already castled and is sufficiently developed. This gives you enough incentive to blast open the centre with d4, since Black is ill-equipped to respond effectively. Normally pushing d4 like this without c3 in the Ruy Lopez isn't a good idea. ...


3

It will depend on the placement of perhaps mainly the light pieces and the queens. Attacking the enemy d-pawn is definitely an option. Over-protecting your own d-pawn is also an option. Placing a knight on the (for white) e5-forepost is an option. In general, it is a good idea to have a knight that is ready to grab the enemy d-pawn when given a chance. The ...


3

Pawns that stand on or guard a central square (e4, d4, d5 or e5) are said to control the center. For example, the white d-pawn has the its maximum center control on d4. Yet, after d2-d4, it loses the potential control over c4 and e4 (the move d2-d3 is no longer possible). So yes, the d- and e-pawn will move forward. Yet, this can create weak squares in the ...


3

I'm going to assume that the importance of the center in general terms is already something you are aware of. In short, controlling the center means that your pieces will be able to access/utilize the whole board much better than if your opponent does. Pawns allow a strong control of the center by virtue of the fact that they are both weak (meaning your ...


3

So now I am reforming and reconstructing my life. First of all, calm down. Hey, it's just a game! You sound as if your whole life depends upon whether you win or lose! You might want to read this post about how to deal with losses. Why do I push my E and D pawns in openings? I would caution you against criticizing your opening (or any other aspect of ...


3

A white pawn on e4 controls e4, d5 and f5. It also has a role for the diagonals b1-h7 and h1-a8. A pawn does control the square it is standing on, since otherwise the opponent can place e.g. a pawn there. For example, if white has the pawn on e3, then black can advance e7-e5-e4 and take control over e4, d3 and f3. Thus, the white e4-pawn has several purposes....


3

Here are a few reasons 1.e4 is better than 1.e3. I'm sure other respondents will come up with others. All things being equal, it's nicer to have more space than less space. It gives you more room to maneuver your pieces behind your pawns. Black would love to play both ...d5 and ...e5, controlling the whole center on your side of the board. If you played e4 ...


3

According to some GMs, d4 is the best first move. Alekhine, commenting on a Slav in his greatest games book, claims it gives White more chances of gaining an advantage. After taking the c pawn, Alekhine further comments that White now obtains an appreciable advantage. (Quoted by Hans Berliner.) Hans Berliner, in his book The System--A World Champion's ...


3

As a general principle, when my opponent is breaking (in a loose sense) the opening principles by not occupying the center, I try to combat this by following the principles even more. As a result, I would try to avoid making multiple pawn moves and instead try to get my pieces out once establishing e5 and d5. For example, in your line I would play ...


3

All the main lines against the Sicilian are the open Sicilian. This opening of the center gives white better attacking chances against black's lack of development. Larsen claims that playing d4 is a positional mistake, allowing black to exchange a less valuable wing pawn for a center pawn. Spassky played the closed Sicilian with great results. And there ...


3

You are certainly far from being the first person to raise the question. Alekhine, in his Collected Games, recommends in the notes to one game that White should play 3.Be2, but in all of his other games he actually plays 3.d4. There is a book called the Chameleon Sicilian by Andy Soltis that points to certain advantages of 2.Ne2, retaining the options of d3 ...


2

I don't understand the central-control difference between 1. e4 and 1. e3 Let us go one thing at a time OK? The books/articles tell me that the center is d4, d5, e4, and e5. That is correct. e4 controls d5, but 1. e3 controls d4. Again, you are right. Both control one square in the center, no? Yes they do. Yet 1. e4 is apparently a vast ...


2

At the beginning of the game, out of the 64 squares of the board 32 are occupied. So, space is a valuable commodity at the beginning of the game. 1) e4 allows white access to the e2 and e3 squares. while at the same time denying black access to those squares. e3 on the other hand allows white access only to e2 but blocks the critical e3 square. so e4 ...


2

Maybe it will help you if you think that as White, the squares d4 and e4 are your part of the center and the squares d5 and e5 are Black's part of the center. Sure, by playing e3, you control d4; and with e4 you control d5. Both moves control only one central square, but e4 controls your opponent's central square, so it is more valuable than e3. Besides, ...


2

Perhaps you would find it useful if I tried to explain the pros and cons of playing the advance variation in the French defense for white. Let's look at its starting position [FEN ""] 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Why does white choose 3.e5? To control the squares e5, d6 and f6 Prevent black from developing with Ng8-f6 Lock down the f7-pawn to attack it later ...


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