15

Carlsen's 26.Kd2 is a a blunder because it exposes the White King to a tactic that wins two pawns and gives Black terrific pressure. The tactic is effectively a guarantee of victory for Black: [FEN "6rr/1k3p2/1pb1p1np/p1p1P2R/2P3R1/2P1B3/P1BK1PP1/8 b - - 0 1"] 1...Nxe5! 2.Rxg8 (2.Rxe5? Rxg4) Nxc4+! {The Knight gets out of danger, with check and an extra ...


9

The longest ever World Championship game was played between Korchnoi and Karpov; it lasted for 124 moves. [FEN ""] [Event "WCC 1978 Game 5"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [White "Viktor Korchnoi"] [Black "Anatoly Karpov"] [ECO "E42"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. d4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 c5 5. Nge2 d5 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Nxc3 cxd4 8. exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nc6 10. Be3 O-O 11. O-O b6 12. Qd3 Bb7 ...


8

[FEN ""] [Event "WCh 2014"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2014.11.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [Eventdate "2014.11.08"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 ...


8

In my analysis, I found Black's kingside position to be more solid than it seems at first glance. After Kh8 and Rg8, Black defends g7 very well. Black should play 34...Qd2, after which his Black's strategy is simple - push h6 to create a flight square for the king. Keep the queen active and target White's c-pawn and a-pawn. In some situations, Black can ...


7

Anand could have chosen [fen "5rk1/4R1pp/3q1p2/p1p2P2/P3Q2P/5p2/2P2PPK/8 w - - 0 1"] [Event "WCC"] [Site "Sochi"] [Date "2014.11.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Magnus Carlsen"] [Black "Viswanathan Anand"] [Result "1-0"] 1.g3 Qd2 2.Qxf3 Qxc2 3.Kg2 After which we reach a Queen+Rook middlegame. In such middlegames, the following factors are critical: King safety ...


6

Carlsen's move(26.Kd2) was a blunder because of Anand's practically winning move(26...Nxe5!) which had a discovered attack on the rook on G4(and potential to take on C4). The double blunder occurred when Anand missed this move and played A4 which is a clear blunder when he had another great move available to him.


5

Anand primarily played 1. d4 in each of his 3 successful world championship matches between 2008 and 2012. In his 2013 match vs. Carlsen he favored 1. e4 before switching to 1. d4 for his last white of the match (game 9). Given the disastrous result of the 2013 match for him, I don't think it's surprising that he is apparently relying on 1. d4 this time.


5

10...Ne4 doesn't help Black preserve the bishop pair. After the surprising move 11.a3!, Black is forced to take the knight on c3 with the bishop and then we reach a position similar to the one in the game, except that Black's knight is on a more vulnerable e4 square than on a safe square like d7. The pawn on c3 cannot be captured without a significant ...


5

Due to funding and other problems with FIDE, the world championship schedule has been changed many times during past few years. TLDR: After the title reunification match in 2006, there was a tournament in 2007, followed by matches in every two years, starting from 2008. The 2013 match was an exception. The match in 2006 was the reunification match between ...


4

The world chess championship has been notorious for having inconsistencies in the years it is played in. Allegedly the world champion had been able to refuse challenges in the past for a plethora of reasons(not enough money, not wanting to play in a certain country) as well as issues with financing for the world championship(after all someone's gonna have to ...


3

It is definitely worth considering, and probably an equally good move, but unfortunately it only leads to a similar simplification of the position (rather quickly), so Rc7 wouldn't really give an edge because black is well prepared to face it, as Ne7 prepares it. Either black replies by 25.Rc7 Bc6, locking the rook in to force the exchange, e.g. 26.Nd4 is ...


3

In a hypothetical situation where Carlsen knew that he was going to lose the match and his number one priority was to preserve his rating points, then his best option would be to lose as quickly as possible. As pointed out in this question (EDIT: Values updated as per JiK's comment below), Carlsen will lose 1 rating points for each game he draws with Anand. ...


2

As a small contribution, I would like to quote GM Dejan Bojkov from his analysis and commentary of the game, where he mentions a line similar to one already thoroughly analysed by Wes: [FEN "5rk1/4R1pp/3q1p2/p1p2P2/P3Q2P/5pP1/2P2P1K/8 b - - 0 1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] 1...Qd2 2.Qxf3 Qxc2 3.Ra7 Re8 4.Rxa5 Magnus would ...


2

Analysing the whole game, not just the opening moves, the main problem with black's position was the dark squares. Despite having his dark squared bishop, once the pawn marched to c7 the dominance of Bf4 over Be7 was beyond any doubt. It is true that Carlsen made a few mistakes with several recaptures, but these moves were natural and probably every human ...


1

I have little idea about the Gruenfeld (hopefully someone who is more familiar or a better player than I am can give a more complete answer), but a few points you may have overlooked: After 1...Bg4 2.f3, as you say the pawn structure is marginally weaker, but there's also a bigger problem of how white will develop the g1-knight. Nf3 is now impossible, Nh3 ...


1

After 3 days of analyzing the position and searching through the Internet, I have decided to switch from playing 7...c6 to 7...Nh5. It seems that Black has easier time here, with fully equal chances. Next, I have searched online for comments about 17...Nxg5 as I really liked the move. That didn't turn out too well for Black, so I had to satisfy myself with ...


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