15

From this Chess.com Discussion In terms of games played, it would be Tal with 95 games (46 wins, 49 draws) from October 23, 1973 to October 16, 1974. He also has the second longest streak of 84 games (47 wins, 39 draws) from July 1972 to April 1973. In terms of time, Capablanca was undefeated for 63 games (40 wins, 23 draws from February 10, 1916 to ...


12

In Megabase 2016, Capablanca played 791 games as White and won 52.6% of them, and played 406 games as Black and won 48.5% of them, so he didn't win more as Black but it was surprisingly close. The discrepancy between number of White games and Black games was surprising, so I broke out his simultaneous displays (in which he would generally be playing White). ...


12

The International Chess Congress, St. Petersburg, 1909 is a classic by World Champion Emanuel Lasker was written in 1910 and is in the public domain. [EDIT] ISBN: 1888690097, can be viewed online or downloaded in PDF at http://archive.org/details/internationalche00lask


9

I am aware of ISBN 5278004010 Cons: the book is in Russian, I don't know if there's an English translation Pros: contains all match games, most of them annotated (some games aren't annotated, contain just some short comments about particular moves at the end) annotations by Alekhine himself contains other games played by Alekhine in tournaments before ...


8

Tim Harding's The Kibitzer column on Chesscafe.com recently had an article about finding old chess books online. Basically he goes to Google Books and Forgotten Books, and searches for chess. See the article for details. In the article, he says he's found the following old chess books this way, although whether they are available to you or not depends on ...


7

You can find more books at the following sites: http://chesszone.org/lib/lib.html http://www.chessville.com/downloads/ebooks.htm http://www.chessmaniac.com/chess_ebooks/index.shtml http://books.google.com/books?lr=&q=chess&as_brr=1


7

Black is down 2 pawns, pieces completely passive, the pawn on e6 is impossible to get rid of, pawn on h6 is also important, creating potential outpost on g7 for rook. White also has two bishops and controls both open files. There is no need for White to prove anything by concrete analysis. Unless Black has some immediate way to get material back - he might ...


6

I am currently doing some research on the subject and hopefully can provide a more complete answer later, but apparently Capablanca did not invest much time. As he said (extracted from this compilation) about his tenth move: I thought for a little while before playing this, knowing that I would be subjected thereafter to a terrific attack, all the lines ...


4

"Substantial' is a subjective term, but if you like Informant-style annotations the Chess Stars' book (Volume 2 of the three volume set of Alekhine's games, ISBN 9548782235) has some detailed analyses. It's possibly repeated in ISBN 9548782065, Vol 2 of their 2-vol set on Capablanca. I haven't done a detailed comparison of the two. Game 2 is fairly short, ...


4

I can understand fresh eyes still wanna fight this, but after 50 moves of despair, once the main diagonal and the d file are so open, I can't help but support his resignation. Just flip the board, take the black pieces, and search for moves. Almost none are playable, as every piece already defends various threats, white still having 2 pieces with which to ...


3

In the US, you can date public domain for the most part by the date of "Steamboat Willie," the first Mickey Mouse cartoon. Any time it gets close to falling into public domain, Disney opens up Scrooge McDuck's vault and buys enough votes in Congress to prevent it. There's a small loophole that was closed in the 70's which says works which didn't have their ...


3

After 16... Bxa6 17. Qxa6 the problem is that black has no play. His white-squared bishop is really important in the upcoming attack on the white king (this is the only play black can try), so if he exchanged it on a6, white would have a very comfortable position (mainly thanks to the attack on the black's weak queenside) and nothing to fear. EDIT: I ...


2

Stockfish says Black is crushed after 49. ... Nbc8 even though this is black's best move. White is up by 17 points. [FEN "kq3r2/p1r1n2p/Pn1QPp1P/1P2pP1B/2p1P3/2P1B1R1/8/2KR4 b - - 2 49 "] [StartFlipped "0"] 1...Nbc8 2. Qb4 Rh8 3. Rg7 Nc6 4. bxc6 Qxb4 5. cxb4 Rxc6 1-0 A variation. After black's 50th move the wheels come off the wagon. [FEN "kq3r2/p1r1n2p/...


2

Just recently was published my book "José Raúl Capablanca, A Chess Biography", McFarland, 2015. One of the chapter, number 13, is dedicated to the match Capablanca-Alekhine, 1927. Games 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 12, 17, 20, 22, 27, 29, 31 and 34 are fully annotated. The chapter includes several interviews and daily information from the Buenos Aires newspapers. One of ...


1

What, then, after he takes the bishop? I can imagine Capablanca rolling in his grave right now. Black will be down a pawn whereas white will keep pressure on the a6-c8 diagonal. White doesn't need to get greedy and take the a7 pawn after ...Nb8 (but he can if the knight just sits unprotected on d7). After the bishop exchange, black's center is distended. ...


1

Surely Capablanca played much more than a few hundred games, so obviously the observation bias makes it undesirable to base this answer on the numbers. Therefore I provide a general answer to why strong people may score better with black than with white: If you play a significantly weaker opponent, it is common courtesy to let them play with white. At ...


1

Capablanca was a master of strategy and positional playing and was able to play some of the greatest defenses of all times. Those are all aspects that are fundamentals in playing as black. Also Magnus Carlsen excels in those aspects and plays very good games with the black pieces. Yet, the win % of both is higher with White.


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