18

From this Chess.com Discussion In terms of games played, it would be Tal with 95 games (46 wins, 49 draws) from October 23, 1973 to October 16, 1974. He also has the second longest streak of 84 games (47 wins, 39 draws) from July 1972 to April 1973. In terms of time, Capablanca was undefeated for 63 games (40 wins, 23 draws from February 10, 1916 to ...


12

In Megabase 2016, Capablanca played 791 games as White and won 52.6% of them, and played 406 games as Black and won 48.5% of them, so he didn't win more as Black but it was surprisingly close. The discrepancy between number of White games and Black games was surprising, so I broke out his simultaneous displays (in which he would generally be playing White). ...


11

Your proposal is a plausible way to get to that position. I wouldn't call the Scandinavian "bad" just because it moves a piece twice. It's perfectly playable. When the trap was played in the following game, it was the knight rather than the queen which moved twice. [Site "Sao Paulo (Brazil)"] [Date "1973.??.??"] [White "Nobrega Adaucto Da "] [Black "Barata ...


10

I found a few references, but the best one was this article on chessbase.com that seems to attribute it to Yuri Dorogov, who was born in in 1947. From that article, it is still not 100% clear if Dorogov created the puzzle and story, or was just the name of the person the creator used in the story, but Dorogov is a real person. This is a quote from the ...


8

I am currently doing some research on the subject and hopefully can provide a more complete answer later, but apparently Capablanca did not invest much time. As he said (extracted from this compilation) about his tenth move: I thought for a little while before playing this, knowing that I would be subjected thereafter to a terrific attack, all the lines ...


6

First, the great Capablanca aside, Bc3 is not forced at all. It is considered the slightly preferred move by Stockfish 10 on my computer, which is fairly strong. In the Mega 2019 database, it occurs 1788 times, and has a winning percentage for white of 54.5%. Almost equal per the computer (both eval at 0.00, but initially 7...Bc3 is a little better for ...


6

The initial way you gave is the overwhelming favorite way to get to that in the Mega Database. Out of the 72 games, that move order occurred 59 times (three times, white played Nf3, and only after did Nc3 Qd8 get played). The other 13 times, saw Nd5; Bc4 Nc6 as in the game below. That game was the only one that had an ECO code of B02 somehow, with the rest ...


5

Capablanca's comments about the match can be found in this book.


5

2) In this game Capa played h6 I think to prevent Ng5 but according to Alekhine this was not a good move. I don't understand why play another move and invite the Knight to g5? This position comes from the famous game in which Richard Reti defeated the reigning world champion, Jose Raul Capablanca, in New York in 1924. [fen ""] [title "Reti vs ...


5

I first saw saw this problem in Chess Life from 1972, p. 308.


4

[FEN ""] 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd8 Above is a playable line of the Scandinavian defense. 3...Qa5 and maybe also 3...Qd6 are more popular, but Qd8 isn't horrible. The tactical trick itself is more general. It can occur, for example, in the following gambit line: [FEN ""] 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.f3 exf3 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.Bc4 Bg4


4

I have looked at sources in Spanish (mainly Cuban) and most of them purport the same story (similar to that presented in the question) copied and pasted. However, a couple of sources present a somewhat different story. An article in the journal Tribuna de La Habana says (my translation): With humility and pride she always kept in her memory the two ...


4

If the game goes 1..c5 2.b5 the engine shows white slightly better but if 1..a5 2.b5 then the engine shows black slightly better.Why is that?? [fen "r2qr1k/pbpn1pbp/1p1p1np1/4p3/1PP5/3P1NP1/PBQNPPBP/R2R2K1 b - - 1 1"] 1... c5 (1... a5 2. b5) 2. b5 After 1..c5 2.b5 the a7 pawn is weak and after 1..a5 2.b5 the c7 pawn is weak. The difference between the ...


3

Only if your intuition is good enough:) You overlook the training and experience he had. Emanuel Lasker said he did not memorize anything he can deduce. From my playing over his games he was a quiet patient positional player who could mix it up if the situation forced him to do that.


3

I finally got around to reading the book Chess To Enjoy by Andrew Soltis after I found that I could borrow it on the Internet Archive. The problem appears on page 207, and the last name "Dorogov" is mentioned, which means that the suspected composer Yuri Dorogov is named in the story attached to the problem, with the usual alien vs person situation. On page ...


3

Just recently was published my book "José Raúl Capablanca, A Chess Biography", McFarland, 2015. One of the chapter, number 13, is dedicated to the match Capablanca-Alekhine, 1927. Games 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 12, 17, 20, 22, 27, 29, 31 and 34 are fully annotated. The chapter includes several interviews and daily information from the Buenos Aires newspapers. One of ...


3

Yes, after 2...g6 black is only a bishop behind and not immediately checkmated. But that doesn't matter much for the result -- being a full piece behind is also enough to resign. And, that he stays a piece behind is immediately obvious -- white takes a bishop, black doesn't take back. So that doesn't really need to be explained. On the other hand, what ...


3

In the US, you can date public domain for the most part by the date of "Steamboat Willie," the first Mickey Mouse cartoon. Any time it gets close to falling into public domain, Disney opens up Scrooge McDuck's vault and buys enough votes in Congress to prevent it. There's a small loophole that was closed in the 70's which says works which didn't have their ...


3

After 16... Bxa6 17. Qxa6 the problem is that black has no play. His white-squared bishop is really important in the upcoming attack on the white king (this is the only play black can try), so if he exchanged it on a6, white would have a very comfortable position (mainly thanks to the attack on the black's weak queenside) and nothing to fear. EDIT: I ...


3

One hundred years ago grandmasters, even the great Capablanca, were given to making sweeping judgments about opening positions without supporting evidence, often condemning moves that have been shown to be quite playable. In fact 5...Bxc3 is now considered a "book" move, though 5...O-O is probably slightly better. And as to 5.d3 making the exchange ...


2

To answer this question you would first have to explain what you mean by "long". If you define "long" as over the number of games played, then the next question is "which games do you count?" It shouldn't be surprising that if a grandmaster plays in their local weekend circuit against much-weaker players, they are almost never ...


2

Kasparov's My Great Predecessors series covers all the world champions before him, including the world championship matches they participated in. The one you're interested in is dealt with in volume 1 of the series.


2

I have found a source in Spanish that is like the cuban enciclopedia and tells that those games were played in simultaneous games. https://www.ecured.cu/Mar%C3%ADa_Teresa_Mora_Iturralde


2

The databases are going to be entirely incomplete. She became the Cuban Champion early in the early 20's but there isn't a single game recorded anywhere. The only documented game I can find of her is against Capablanca. This isn't overly surprising as she was privately tutored by him. So there is absolutely no doubt that they were known to each other or that ...


1

I think there is no simple answer to this question and you will develop understanding day by day. In chess basically, the bishop is more valuable than the knight in an open position. When the black exchange the bishop with the knight, it would be a bad exchange. Furthermore, you can not take the e4 pawn. Example variant is 5 .. Bxc3 6.dxc3 Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. ...


1

Chess Query Language is a tool you can use to search for games like these in your database of games of choice. It shouldn't be too hard to do this- certainly easier than the (good!) suggestion of Python by others


1

What, then, after he takes the bishop? I can imagine Capablanca rolling in his grave right now. Black will be down a pawn whereas white will keep pressure on the a6-c8 diagonal. White doesn't need to get greedy and take the a7 pawn after ...Nb8 (but he can if the knight just sits unprotected on d7). After the bishop exchange, black's center is distended. He ...


1

Surely Capablanca played much more than a few hundred games, so obviously the observation bias makes it undesirable to base this answer on the numbers. Therefore I provide a general answer to why strong people may score better with black than with white: If you play a significantly weaker opponent, it is common courtesy to let them play with white. At ...


1

Capablanca was a master of strategy and positional playing and was able to play some of the greatest defenses of all times. Those are all aspects that are fundamentals in playing as black. Also Magnus Carlsen excels in those aspects and plays very good games with the black pieces. Yet, the win % of both is higher with White.


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