10

I had the same problem which (to some extent) I've managed to overcome. I didn't ever get enough chances to practice OTB games so I could never get used to it. My solution was to play online games with a real board in front of me. I made myself play out the moves on the board and used my computer only to get my opponents move and to enter mine. As long as ...


10

It's probably for historic reasons. Chess is very old and a metaphor for two armies making war, and people chose to make 'statues' to represent the pieces. Since this has worked well so far, nobody felt the urge to change them to 'tiles', that is, until computer chess came into being. I've never played Shogi on a real board, but I can imagine 2D pieces are ...


8

Expanding on the great comments of @David and @Timothy Chow, GM Nikolai Krogius talks about the role of the residual image in his book Psychology in Chess. This is an image that stays and blurs the calculations. The residual image is the transfer of judgment from a past position to a new situation. The past then acts on the present. To combat this ...


7

I could not decide is this an answer or comment but finally decided to add it as answer. Why isn't chess played with flat pieces? Because it is played with flat pieces as well; Many travel chess sets have flat pieces, but I think for historical reasons, as chess used to be royal game, played by aristocracy and play sets where created mainly for them, as ...


7

The first thing is that you should have a general idea where your play is, whether on the queenside, center, or kingside. Your plan as to where your place your pieces, and how you open that part of the board is going to be based on the opening pawn structure. If it is later in the game, you want to try to figure out where the opponent is weakest. From there,...


6

I would recomend getting tips on how to think from CJS Purdy's blog; see the associated links on the right hand pane. CJS Purdy was the first World Correspondence Chess Champion. Bobby Fischer praised his didactic abilities. My view is that the basis of winning chess revolves around the double threat. (A triple threat is rarer but even better!) The double ...


5

Same here, I had trouble playing with actual wooden chess before, especially with real chess clocks. The solution is to engage yourself in chess by playing in actual chess games. Join to local chess clubs or play with your friends with actual chess boards. Soon playing with an actual chessboard and online games will have no difference. It took me 3 months ...


4

I would recommend using chess eye, here's a video about it, it will help you memorize the board, difficult but fun! EDIT I don't think this is the answer you're looking for, but I'm answering anyway since there's no other answer and since my initial answer didn't help much, i feel that i must improve my answer even if it won't help you. Here's how i ...


3

[FEN "2Q1Q3/2Q4Q/Q4Q2/3k4/Q5Q1/1R6/B1NBQ3/K2R1N2 w - - 0 1"] How many mates? What was black's last move? hint: this construction (by Anthony Stewart Mackay Dickens, published in The Problemist, Jan 1970) ties the record (set by Nenad Petrovic, Sahovski Vjesnika, 1947), using fewer units. Happy counting. But, frankly, I doubt this is useful to you.....


3

As was pointed out before me, that level of calculation is extremely impressive. You are at the end of the day looking at one of the top chess players in the world and, arguably, in history to this day. Apart from that note, you should know that visualization is a matter of practice, and the acquisition of such skill is not different to that of arithmetic ...


3

Okay, this sequence is very impressive and Nakamura is a "beast". So I don't want to be too pessimistic but I'm afraid that this kind of performance, which consists in calculating at the speed of light a sequence of movements without error, is only possible for the highest rated players. There is, however, a (little) hope. In the excellent perpetual chess ...


3

There definitely could be something to this. My father, and a friend of mine, were air traffic controllers. They both told me that you generally want a smaller screen so you can see everything at once. The friend was also a chess player, and we talked about how big you wanted the chess app or browser to display the board. It does seem to make sense that ...


3

Flat chess pieces do exist on the market, in the form of "pocket chess" sets in which there isn't room to provide 3D pieces. In this example, notice the lack of extra queens for promoting pawns to: As others note, the provided photo is not the typical viewing angle for a player. Here is a more typical view, in this case of one of the nicer chess computers:...


3

I used to try to imagine the whole board and it always seemed my mind would focus more narrowly. Then, one time when I was doing an exhibition in public versus just one opponent, I suddenly saw the chessboard a different way: it was floating in darkness and the board was translucent, so I could move around the board and see it (and the pieces) from different ...


3

I would think that with regular play, your "sight" of the board will improve. It's like anything else in that practice will lead to improvement. Also, playing a lot will enhance your sense of where things are on the board. For example, in a fianchettoed position, you'll automatically sense that the enemy bishop is on the long diagonal. At least I've found ...


3

What you are talking about is called "board vision". Googling "chess board vision" will get you a ton of stuff. One thing that may help. On looking at an enemy piece (or one of your own) do not ask "where is it?" but ask directly "what is it doing?". For example, that Bishop is controlling that diagonal, which is annoying because I would like to use some ...


3

There is a nice story attached to the 1960 Tal-Botwinnik match. They adjourned after 40 moves and began analysing the game so far. Botwinnik had got his Queen offside and Tal had numerous exciting sacrifices to look at but had not played any of them. In the analysis, Tal was trying to find out if any of them would have worked, but noticed after a while that ...


2

The meanings of the squares don't change depending on whether you are looking at the board from White's or Black's point of view. So try to think about the squares' function rather than just identifying them by coordinates. I will give some examples. When I think 'c4', I think "White's second move in the Queen's Gambit Declined, and the square he moves his ...


2

I do not agree with the first answer saying that blindfold chess does not involve visualising real pieces. On the contrary, I create a 'real' analogy of a chess board with pieces, etc, and interactively update it and manipulate it during the game. I can, however, do it much better using descriptive rather than algebraic notation. This is probably because the ...


2

There are two reasons that come to mind: 1) There are Pawns, Knights, Bishops, Rooks, Queens, and Kings and a non-flat design makes it easier to tell them apart. 2) There is a touch-move rule where if you touch a piece and it's interpreted as intentionally you must move it: it's easier to move pieces that are smaller at the top than at the base. The ...


2

In my experience at first you should just work on chess as much as you can, especially on combinations. If you get comfortable with visualizing positions that result from the combinations you will notice to be able to also follow positions in chess books. Then it's time to read endgame books. At first you will not be able to follow the moves too deep, but ...


2

Flat boards are used online because both players can see the pieces properly oriented. Now imagine playing online chess with half the screen upside-down. Also, a flat screen is not the best representation of a 3D object, so that's why most players use 2D boards online. Same for chess books by the way. Finally, thank you for giving me another reason why ...


2

What are the priorities/responsibilities of my pieces?(there are times where a piece is protecting more than a single square.) Is there a move that can force the opponent a certain move? If there is, how can I take advantage of it? Is there a move that has multiple purposes? How will my opponent respond to my move? Is the sacrifice worth it? These are the ...


1

Not trying to belittle this achievement, but I think the hardest part is to speak as quickly as Hikaru does. I do think that it is impressive but not to the extent that the other answers suggest. Reasons: black's position is clearly won by a variety of ways, in fact the cleanest and fastest way would be 1. Ne7 instead of Bf1 the sequence that Hikaru ...


1

I suspect this is due to my table being tall so my angle of view isn't the best one. Online ratings are usually inflated or higher than over-the-board rating system. I remember I achieved an 2300+ on chessclub.com, but my FIDE is much less. There were GMs over 3200+ on the system, but they were just about 2600 FIDE level. Are you sure you really performed ...


1

Advisable to use smartphone? Not really. Okay occasionally if you must look at a position. As you noted a PC is more helpful to seeing the board and planning your moves. I have found no difference between using PC screen adjusted to my preferences and using a real chessboard with physical items on it. For me the difference between chess sets and boards ...


1

Establish an order to analyse the lines! I would begin by the most forced moves (checks, mate threats, captures...) and finish with those where the opponent was multiple possibilities. Respect that order strictly so you won't be jumping back and forth. Use the same criteria also for sorting subvariations (ie: start by the most obvious check, pick an ...


1

I guess it's vital to become comfortable with chessboard coordinates. You might train here.


1

Two quick things which I think might help (though I realise your question is old): 1) lichess.org has a training tool specifically aimed at improving your knowledge of algebraic notation; coordinates flash on the screen (eg "E7") and you have to click on the correct square, answering as many as possible in a set period of time. It varies between showing the ...


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