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30

50 points sounds huge, but there actually is no meaningful difference between -6.4 and -62 in such an endgame.* 6.4 is more or less "Black has a queen for a bishop (but I haven't found a way to make progress yet)" 62 on the other hand is "I have found that way to a position that is 100% won (but I haven't found a forced mate yet)" Why ...


22

Pawn structure. Allowing the exchange ...Nxf4 gxf4 simply weakens your structure considerably. The pawns on f2, f4 and h2 are disjointed and cannot protect each other anymore. Black can immediately start attacking f4 with a following ...Bh6, for example, and your only way to defend that pawn is by moving your queen into a pin. Due to the tactical danger ...


22

This sounds like a bug. Using Lichess's analysis engine, it takes Stockfish 14 less than ten seconds to find a mate in 11 moves. Both 1...Kg3 and 1...g1=Q lead to mate in 11. So there should be no difference in which move you start with, even objectively (of course as a human I'd go 1...g1=Q without thinking).


21

The official source that people link to when this question comes up is Tim Krabbe's excellent blog post from more than 20 years ago now: The ultimate blunder. He collected every single game in the database (pre 1999) where someone resigned in a winning position and explained the possible reasons behind the resignation for each game as well. Some very famous ...


12

Its evaluation drops form +2.3 to +0.0, so it considers it a blunder. Of course this does not match what a human understands as "blunder", but computers are incapable of identifying that. Your move is a perfectly reasonable one and if that's the biggest type of "blunder" you make in your games, you're on your way to a Grandmaster title.


11

14.Nxd4 takes a pawn on d4, and it attacks the bishop on h5. So if black takes back with 14...cxd4, then white has 15.Bxh5, leaving white a pawn up (knights and bishops have roughly the same value). And if black wants to avoid this with 14...Bxe2, white can take back with the knight on d4 (15.Nxe2) so that it is safe too; again, white wins a pawn. And if ...


10

Other answers have made many good points. But the main reason g3 is a bad move can be reduced to a very simple explanation: The knight on h5 is a very bad piece, it has almost no squares to go to and can easily be threatened to be trapped. The best move in the position is 1.Bd2, this is because compared to other squares for the bishop to move to, it blocks ...


9

Some quick Googling suggests that the rules (or at least some sets of rules) do allow you to refuse a resignation from your opponent This does not reflect the FIDE Laws of Chess. According to Article 5.1.2: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. This means that no player, GM or otherwise, is ...


7

Since I could not find any complete explanation, I followed the eternal advice "Use the source, Luke". The Stockfish authors did a great job because their code is easily followable and commented. Relevant parts from search.cpp: // If skill level is enabled, swap best PV line with the sub-optimal one if (skill.enabled()) std::swap(...


7

A blunder is a game-changing move. Nb8 does not change the result of the game which is utterly and completely lost regardless of black's move. Earlier in the game black did blunder when it gave away its queen. The reason for the "!" part of the "?!" (dubious move) notation in this case is because moving the knight opens up the line of ...


7

No matter what, White is doomed. Black has much more material and there is no immediate threat to the Black king that White can cook up. The only checks available are futile ones. Additionally, the White king is in the hole, deep into a mating net and constricted by two Black rooks. Checkmate is inevitable in this position. In fact, according to Stockfish ...


6

The "blunder" annotation is derived from server-side analysis using a low engine depth, which is usually inaccurate.


6

Bf8, while a nice positional move, an excellent idea for a 1200 rated player, is a mistake as Nxe4 wins an important central pawn for no compensation. The Queen can't recapture due to the coming skewer down the long diagonal. See the lines below. Remember tactics always trump strategy! [White ""] [Black ""] [FEN "1k1rr3/1bpqbp2/...


4

I would not go so far as to call it a "blunder", but White is getting lots of compensation for the pawn. They get a big lead in development and Black's queen can be attacked. Here's one way it could go: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. d4 Qh4 3. Nf3 Qxe4+ 4. Be2 exd4 5. O-O Nc6 6. Re1 Be7 7. Na3 Nf6 (7... a6 8. Bxa6) 8. Nb5 O-O 9. Nxc7 Rb8 10. Bb5 ...


3

Computer annotations these days commonly use ?! to indicate moves which are noticeably worse than the best move, but not bad enough to warrant a ? or ??. There's not necessarily any merit to the move, as there would have been in the old meaning to the annotation. The program I use to auto-annotate my games uses a threshold of 3 for ??, 1.5 for ?, and 0.5 for ...


3

Pretty hopeless unless your opponent blunders. Your only strategy is to avoid rook trades and use your knight to set up a fork. Unfortunately, you have no immediate move that proceeds with this strategy. If your rook moves, you well lose your knight. Your king has no legal moves. And if you move your night then Rd5 is mate. Your only hope is to play Na6, in ...


2

Similar things have happened, but it's not because one player misevaluated the position. Source Having beaten down the desperate resistance of the opponent, [GM David Navara] achieved the position where either mate or the loss of the rook was inevitable and at that moment he offered a draw. The situation was clarified by both Grandmasters. David Navara: – ...


2

You could try PGN ChessBook Which is a free app that has some good automatic blunder-check / game-annotation features. It can find blunders, then automatically annotate the game by inserting variations and (optionally) adding comments to the blunder moves, which can then be printed out, as described in this video How to find and print out game blunders using ...


2

White can protect the pawn with Nc3, then attack the black Q with Nf3 to gain a tempo in addition to the advantage of the first move. It is not a blunder but Qh4 by black is a poor move and inferior. Perhaps is is a totally bad move as it does not show up as played by anybody at any level in chess tempo list of millions of games.


1

At the GM level, players mostly resign after the second "slow crushing" method. In amateur chess usually a blunder of a queen or checkmate or major piece wins. Before 1000 it is the first around 99% of the time (talking chess.com elo) because they cannot calculate well enough to find tactics. Even at the IM and GM level players will still blunder, ...


1

The other answers are focusing on openings but that's not at all the reason why you're stuck at your level. You've pretty much asked your own question: you keep making blunders. No matter how deep your strategical knowledge is, you won't get anything from it if you hang a piece, no matter how badly you'd been dominating your opponent before. I'd suggest you ...


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