Hot answers tagged

32

If you want to avoid "dumb blunders" - i.e. just dropping a piece you've left hanging on the other side of the board - a simple method is to take an inventory of the position before you do anything else on each move. Checking which of your pieces are attacked and which of your pieces are hanging would be a good start. The brain will catalogue this ...


27

This is not a blunder, expected behaviour from the engine. Everything worked as intended. Try to copy the FEN string out, and you'll know. Although the position looked winning, White didn't have enough moves to force checkmate before the 50 moves rule. Stockfish, knowing the position was a dead draw immediately asked for simplification. The position you ...


24

In short, after some investigation, I do not believe that white was a 2200 player is the real answer. First, I found it odd that it says he was exactly 2200. This is the only tournament I can find that he ever played, and it was an Olympiad, which had to be FIDE rated. He was also from Brazil, which was not a strong chess region in the world at that time. It ...


21

I will go back to what Artur Yusupov, three-time World Championship Candidate, former top-10 player, and one of the greatest living trainers recommends in the first book of his 10-volume series. In volume one, "Boost Your Chess - Build Up Your Chess", chapter 9, which is two-move mates, including composed problems: The aim of this lesson is to improve ...


19

Pawn structure. Allowing the exchange ...Nxf4 gxf4 simply weakens your structure considerably. The pawns on f2, f4 and h2 are disjointed and cannot protect each other anymore. Black can immediately start attacking f4 with a following ...Bh6, for example, and your only way to defend that pawn is by moving your queen into a pin. Due to the tactical danger ...


17

White (Rigaud) did not have a Fide rating. Until 1981, the Fide rating floor was 2200, which means that any rated player had at least 2205 and that non-rated players taking part in a Fide-rated event were given a provisionnal rating of 2200. This is the case of Rigaud in Nice 1974. In other words, 2200 only means that the player was unrated. This was ...


17

The engine considers Qc2+ a blunder because it's a draw by repetition. (I think the position is probably a draw anyway, but Black could at least try for a win.) The problem is that you have already reached this position twice before. If this was the first time you had reached this position, there would be no problem: Qc2+ is actually a good move in itself. ...


16

Carlsen's 26.Kd2 is a a blunder because it exposes the White King to a tactic that wins two pawns and gives Black terrific pressure. The tactic is effectively a guarantee of victory for Black: [FEN "6rr/1k3p2/1pb1p1np/p1p1P2R/2P3R1/2P1B3/P1BK1PP1/8 b - - 0 1"] 1...Nxe5! 2.Rxg8 (2.Rxe5? Rxg4) Nxc4+! {The Knight gets out of danger, with check and an extra ...


15

I am on the road that starts from the "Beginner" stage, trying to leave this "town". I know and understand the rules, I also understand most of the "classic" tactics. I am able to reproduce some mating patterns (and to understand them I think). Based on your information I think I can safely assume that you would see those blunders if someone pointed them ...


14

It is a common problem to calculate all the variations and then suddenly realize that the first move was simply terrible. Actually, there is a rule that should be applied after finishing a complicated calculation, the Blumenfeld rule! The Blumenfeld rule is formulated roughly as follows. After finishing a complicated calculation, take a fresh look at the ...


13

Coincidentally I already answered exactly this question in response to a similar question. Edit: This similar question was about frequencies of blunders in games, which made the analysis somewhat misleading when directly applied to this question. Originally I looked for blunders from equal positions per game move, which made the results a bit confusing ...


12

AlwaysLearningNewStuff's answer is very good but I'd like to approach the problem by giving a simple piece of advice I read from GM John Nunn's "Secrets of Practical Chess": Once, I played 100 games against Mike Cook at 10 minutes (for him) vs. 5 minutes (for me). At that time, Mike was about 2300 strength. About halfway through the series (which ...


12

As a human you are intrinsically self biased. This is hypothesized to be an evolutionary adaption and it is impossible to suppress it, or more accurately to think objectively about yourself. Until you are accurately able to gauge and control the degree to which your self-bias affects your own thinking, this will be the primary cause of blunders in your chess ...


12

Lichess.org has a free browser-based game analysis tool that allows you to copy and paste your PGN file for online analysis. It's powered by Stockfish, and the analysis automatically: Annotates the game with inaccuracies, mistakes, and blunders. Graphs the game with an interactive move-by-move advantage chart (see below). Suggests improved lines. Names ...


12

Its evaluation drops form +2.3 to +0.0, so it considers it a blunder. Of course this does not match what a human understands as "blunder", but computers are incapable of identifying that. Your move is a perfectly reasonable one and if that's the biggest type of "blunder" you make in your games, you're on your way to a Grandmaster title.


11

It is probably a bit more general than what you describe, but one move blunders are often called (a case of) "chess blindness". I'm not a hundred percent sure, what exactly happened in you're case but often people make the second move of a combination (or variation) first, because they are ahead of the actual position. But I don't know a succinct term for ...


11

This response will be very critical of OP's attitude to chess analysis, and I realize that it may even come across as somewhat harsh. However, it is assumed below that OP is interested in improving, and thus I feel that some level of harshness is justified here. Playing for cheap tricks - because that is exactly what 18.b3 is - is not something a computer ...


11

By far, the biggest blunder in all world championship is absolutely 32.Bb4?? played by Chigorin in the 1892 match. He threw away the win and the match, landed himself to mate in 2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Chess_Championship_1892 A piece up, Chigorin should have won after 32. Rxb7 (32...Rxd5? 33. Nf4 forks the black rooks).[1] Instead the game ...


11

14.Nxd4 takes a pawn on d4, and it attacks the bishop on h5. So if black takes back with 14...cxd4, then white has 15.Bxh5, leaving white a pawn up (knights and bishops have roughly the same value). And if black wants to avoid this with 14...Bxe2, white can take back with the knight on d4 (15.Nxe2) so that it is safe too; again, white wins a pawn. And if ...


10

I had the same problem which (to some extent) I've managed to overcome. I didn't ever get enough chances to practice OTB games so I could never get used to it. My solution was to play online games with a real board in front of me. I made myself play out the moves on the board and used my computer only to get my opponents move and to enter mine. As long as ...


10

One of the most important things we tell players who are a bit above beginner level is to have a checklist they go through before making each move. It looks like this: checks captures threats opponent's threats ... blunder check So, as part of their move selection, they first look to see if they can give a check. If so they calculate the results. Then they ...


9

Chuzhakin's System is written in 70 PDF pages. video:Chuzhakin's System intro It has 18 Rules to find so called "Hazardous Elements" - HE. Before making the move which we selected we need to check for blunders. All be blunders means that we do not see any HE or we do not see a method how to use HE (about 20 typical methods descirbed in the System). ...


9

What is the worst possible first move for White: 1.f3 or 1.g4? f3 doesn't contribute to the piece development ( it actually hinders it by taking away the best square for the Ng1 ), it doesn't fight for the center ( it only strengthens the e4 square that White can claim anyway with 1.Nc3 or 1.e4 ) and above all it exposes the king. g4 vacates g2 for the ...


9

I happen to have a dataset with 25000 games with stockfish evaluations after every move. I just did a little blunder search and these are my findings: Blunders from an equal position (-1.00 < eval < 1.00) are very rare, even among weaker players. That is not particularly surprising, because we tend to leave the equality region in little steps during ...


9

Blunder: 300 centipawns Mistake: 100 centipawns Inaccuracy: 50 centipawns This is sourced from http://en.lichess.org/qa/75/how-are-these-determined-blunder-mistake-and-inaccuracy It is the first thing that appears when you google "lichess inaccuracy mistake blunder".


8

After a blunder, it helps to look objectively at the position once again and forget the history. You might have been better or worse; but that doesn't matter now after the blunder. What matters is how you go from here. There could be many possibilities of salvaging a draw or even snatching a win by making the position very complicated and causing your ...


8

Why Blunders Happen Personally, I think the biggest factor in blunders is a lack of objectivity. As humans, we have a very real, natural bias in our own favor that prevents us from evaluating ourselves, or our work, objectively. Ego, overconfidence, however you might call it--these are the things that blunders are made of, because at heart, a blunder is ...


8

With 3. f4, you are playing the Latvian Gambit with colors reversed! [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. f3 Nf6 3. f4


8

You are correct that 2.f3 is a terrible idea. The f2, e3 and g3 squares become weak. But it isn't bad enough to resign the game. After all, the game has just begun and the material is still equal. There are a few ideas here for white, for example after [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.f3 Bc5 3.f4!? exf4 4.Nf3 You seem to get some sort of delayed King's gambit that ...


8

Tactics cover a broad area that doesn't only concern mistakes that your opponents make. The pattern recognition faculties that you improve through tactics also help you realize the blunders that you yourself make. I don't recommend trying to change your style of play at all - I tell my students that at an early level, one of the most important things is to ...


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