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31

Getting too used to playing with takebacks could be somewhat detrimental if you were to transition to tournament chess at some point, since it downplays the importance of keeping your guard up and being vigilant about tactical possibilities in positions. Nevertheless, I think that in the setting you indicate playing with occasional takebacks (especially for ...


27

If you want to avoid "dumb blunders" - i.e. just dropping a piece you've left hanging on the other side of the board - a simple method is to take an inventory of the position before you do anything else on each move. Checking which of your pieces are attacked and which of your pieces are hanging would be a good start. The brain will catalogue this ...


27

This is not a blunder, expected behaviour from the engine. Everything worked as intended. Try to copy the FEN string out, and you'll know. Although the position looked winning, White didn't have enough moves to force checkmate before the 50 moves rule. Stockfish, knowing the position was a dead draw immediately asked for simplification. The position you ...


24

In short, after some investigation, I do not believe that white was a 2200 player is the real answer. First, I found it odd that it says he was exactly 2200. This is the only tournament I can find that he ever played, and it was an Olympiad, which had to be FIDE rated. He was also from Brazil, which was not a strong chess region in the world at that time. It ...


21

After you blunder, it's incredibly common to blunder a second time over the next few moves. The most important thing you can do is to avoid this second blunder. In order to do that, you should take a few deep breaths and even get up and walk around. Although it's nice if your opponent doesn't know that you blundered (i.e. your "blunder" could be part of a ...


20

I will go back to what Artur Yusupov, three-time World Championship Candidate, former top-10 player, and one of the greatest living trainers recommends in the first book of his 10-volume series. In volume one, "Boost Your Chess - Build Up Your Chess", chapter 9, which is two-move mates, including composed problems: The aim of this lesson is to improve ...


16

White (Rigaud) did not have a Fide rating. Until 1981, the Fide rating floor was 2200, which means that any rated player had at least 2205 and that non-rated players taking part in a Fide-rated event were given a provisionnal rating of 2200. This is the case of Rigaud in Nice 1974. In other words, 2200 only means that the player was unrated. This was ...


15

Carlsen's 26.Kd2 is a a blunder because it exposes the White King to a tactic that wins two pawns and gives Black terrific pressure. The tactic is effectively a guarantee of victory for Black: [FEN "6rr/1k3p2/1pb1p1np/p1p1P2R/2P3R1/2P1B3/P1BK1PP1/8 b - - 0 1"] 1...Nxe5! 2.Rxg8 (2.Rxe5? Rxg4) Nxc4+! {The Knight gets out of danger, with check and an extra ...


14

It's certainly not just you. While you describe a particular blind spot involving your queen, the more general phenomenon of throwing away sizable advantages is a very common one in chess, and it can be tough to kick. Here's a well-known saying that seems to be due to longtime U.S. champion Frank Marshall (and I'm paraphrasing): The hardest thing in chess ...


14

I am on the road that starts from the "Beginner" stage, trying to leave this "town". I know and understand the rules, I also understand most of the "classic" tactics. I am able to reproduce some mating patterns (and to understand them I think). Based on your information I think I can safely assume that you would see those blunders if someone pointed them ...


13

It is a common problem to calculate all the variations and then suddenly realize that the first move was simply terrible. Actually, there is a rule that should be applied after finishing a complicated calculation, the Blumenfeld rule! The Blumenfeld rule is formulated roughly as follows. After finishing a complicated calculation, take a fresh look at the ...


11

I'll buck the trend here and say it's a bad idea to give takebacks if the blundering player intends to play in tournaments at any point in the future. There are two reasons for this. First, having to finish a blundered game brings home the pain of that blunder more clearly, and makes it more likely that the player will think ahead next time. But even more ...


11

Here is a list of important points: Pros: Both can continue playing and have fun without the need of starting a whole new game. Cons: You don't take blunders seriously and increase the chance of making them on tournaments or important games.


11

Coincidentally I already answered exactly this question in response to a similar question. Edit: This similar question was about frequencies of blunders in games, which made the analysis somewhat misleading when directly applied to this question. Originally I looked for blunders from equal positions per game move, which made the results a bit confusing ...


10

As a human you are intrinsically self biased. This is hypothesized to be an evolutionary adaption and it is impossible to suppress it, or more accurately to think objectively about yourself. Until you are accurately able to gauge and control the degree to which your self-bias affects your own thinking, this will be the primary cause of blunders in your chess ...


10

Lichess.org has a free browser-based game analysis tool that allows you to copy and paste your PGN file for online analysis. It's powered by Stockfish, and the analysis automatically: Annotates the game with inaccuracies, mistakes, and blunders. Graphs the game with an interactive move-by-move advantage chart (see below). Suggests improved lines. Names ...


10

By far, the biggest blunder in all world championship is absolutely 32.Bb4?? played by Chigorin in the 1892 match. He threw away the win and the match, landed himself to mate in 2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Chess_Championship_1892 A piece up, Chigorin should have won after 32. Rxb7 (32...Rxd5? 33. Nf4 forks the black rooks).[1] Instead the ...


10

One of the most important things we tell players who are a bit above beginner level is to have a checklist they go through before making each move. It looks like this: checks captures threats opponent's threats ... blunder check So, as part of their move selection, they first look to see if they can give a check. If so they calculate the results. Then they ...


9

"Let the one who hasn't blundered a major piece throw the first rock!" Who among us is impervious to this? Again, there is no definitive answer to this question, just a list of things we could do to cope. First, Go Easy On Yourself. Don't make it worse by mentally kicking yourself incessantly. I often try to apply the Dennis Prager "Flat Tire quota" in ...


9

AlwaysLearningNewStuff's answer is very good but I'd like to approach the problem by giving a simple piece of advice I read from GM John Nunn's "Secrets of Practical Chess": Once, I played 100 games against Mike Cook at 10 minutes (for him) vs. 5 minutes (for me). At that time, Mike was about 2300 strength. About halfway through the series (which I ...


9

What is the worst possible first move for White: 1.f3 or 1.g4? f3 doesn't contribute to the piece development ( it actually hinders it by taking away the best square for the Ng1 ), it doesn't fight for the center ( it only strengthens the e4 square that White can claim anyway with 1.Nc3 or 1.e4 ) and above all it exposes the king. g4 vacates g2 for the ...


9

It is probably a bit more general than what you describe, but one move blunders are often called (a case of) "chess blindness". I'm not a hundred percent sure, what exactly happened in you're case but often people make the second move of a combination (or variation) first, because they are ahead of the actual position. But I don't know a succinct term for ...


8

You just can hope your opponent makes a mistake too or finding an awesome move to re-gain some advantage. If you do, draw is possible at least. Moreover, more concentration will help you in this case. In other case, your opponent has many chances to win.


8

I have had a situation similar to this plenty of times when I was learning. Once, during a tournament, I was having a bad day and was almost giving my pieces away, for free! And then, I spotted the golden opportunity. If I could trick my opponent into taking my queen with his "for free", I could then forcibly mate him in 4 moves. Given how I had been ...


8

After a blunder, it helps to look objectively at the position once again and forget the history. You might have been better or worse; but that doesn't matter now after the blunder. What matters is how you go from here. There could be many possibilities of salvaging a draw or even snatching a win by making the position very complicated and causing your ...


8

With 3. f4, you are playing the Latvian Gambit with colors reversed! [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. f3 Nf6 3. f4


8

The first English definition of blunder I see is "a stupid or careless mistake", and that's how I have always perceived the term in chess. It's not the severity of the error that matters so much as how silly and avoidable it is. If you played a move that takes the evaluation from 0 to -10 because you missed all the implications of a spectacular sacrifice ...


8

This response will be very critical of OP's attitude to chess analysis, and I realize that it may even come across as somewhat harsh. However, it is assumed below that OP is interested in improving, and thus I feel that some level of harshness is justified here. Playing for cheap tricks - because that is exactly what 18.b3 is - is not something a computer ...


7

I did know someone describing the same phenomenon, i.e. he had a very hard time playing on a 3D real board. He was mostly a bullet player, online, being used to premove, etc., which maybe augmented the discomfort OTB. Apart from “get used to it”, I don't know any ways to accelerate that. Make sure you really wanna get used to it, don't stay in the “I can't ...


7

Tactics cover a broad area that doesn't only concern mistakes that your opponents make. The pattern recognition faculties that you improve through tactics also help you realize the blunders that you yourself make. I don't recommend trying to change your style of play at all - I tell my students that at an early level, one of the most important things is to ...


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