36

No. The main reason behind this train of thought was that they thought that blindfold chess may contribute to going crazy. They looked at Morphy and Pillsbury as their primary examples. Lasker, specifically, thought that blindfold chess made Pillsbury go mad, but we now know it was syphilis. Other than just plain incorrect assumptions like Lasker's, this is ...


26

In essence, you are asking- Can memory (or other brain functions) be improved or is it a natural trait? The answer is yes to both. While it is true that one's memory can be improved, it is also commonly observed that some people are more "gifted" when it comes to memory (and other brain functions) than others. To play blindfold chess, you need three ...


19

As I have said before, this requires physical fitness and strong memory. In order to play blindfolded chess properly you need to master the following: Having always clear vision of the board. Properly move and capture pieces. Properly update the overall position on the board after the move is played. Now it is time to implement solutions for the above ...


14

In my opinion I cannot speak to the health benefits or drawbacks of playing blindfold chess (which I find to be, in my opinion, baseless). What I can say is from experience. I have attempted playing blindfold chess when I was not a very strong player and found it challenging and not worthwhile. However, as my chess progressed I found playing blindfold to ...


14

I learned to play blindfolded chess by practicing it from 2001 to 2005. In my opinion, it is a skill that can be learned, practice will give results. What I do is to try to visualize the chess board and the pieces on the board at every moment of the game. I have to update it one or more times per second, since it keeps vanishing. It does require ...


13

It is obviously a learned skill. No-one pops into the world after gestating for 9 months able to play blindfold chess! Just as no-one arrives destined to be an International footballer, genius mathematician or Olympic athlete. The real question is, is it learned by specifically training to acquire the skills of blindfold chess, or does it develop in some ...


13

Your question is quite interesting. If you are new to blindfold, I think this thread will help you: Can playing blindfold chess be learned or is it a natural skill? Now, back to your query. I have discussed this topic with a GM, who is one year senior at my college. According to him, playing blindfold is "NOT impossible", but it's fairly difficult. ...


10

I just want to share what I am doing now to improve my blindfold chess visualization skill. I downloaded a dozen of minigames of 10 to 15 moves in PGN format from chessgames.com , then I load it from my chess PGN application from my mobile phone. Then I read the PGN and play it on my mind without browsing it from my PGN reader. As I finished the game from ...


9

Generally, the simul-giver needs to keep the games as different from each other as possible. That means the opening themselves are less important, as long as they are different openings. The simul-takers can cooperate with each other; I recall the following story from Tim Krabbé's website: It made me think of a story. A grandmaster once played a 10-board ...


7

the ability to play blindfold chess develops naturally as chess ability improves. By getting better at chess, one gets better at blindfold chess.


7

I cannot speak for whether it ever improved my chess, but I did try several Chess Visualization exercises. (This was a few years back, and I was inspired by the Amber Tournament where Super GM's played Blindfold games that blew me away.) If you do a web search for "Chess Visualization exercises" you can find many leads, and some of them are worth it. (I don'...


7

A friend of mine (and a stronger player) suggested one exercise which has helped me in developing my visualization skills. Take a game, any game and read the first two moves of both sides (ie total four plies), visualize the position now on board, then make these moves on board, see if your visualized position was right. Read the next two moves and ...


6

Playing blindfold is not going to be easy, as @Annatar states. Only if you practice much (and accept that you're going to fail the first few times), you will succeed and over time it will probably become easier. That said, here are some hints: Start with short games. It's easier to replay a 15 move miniature than a 80 move endgame with lots of rook ...


5

I would think developing your board vision must be somewhat useful although I doubt it means a significant difference in playing strength. Blindfold seems a handy way to improve board vision as it can be fun, and you have feedback when you forget the position. Intuitively, a nice benefit of improved board vision would be that it is easier to study. So many ...


4

From the following research I gather that the issue was/is under some debate though most people believe that it doesn't harm your health. I personally don't have an opinion on the subject. In 1930 the USSR banned displays of blindfold chess because they thought it was bad for the health. That same article states that: Botvinnik spoke out against it, ...


4

In my experience and opinion Having more time is not really an advantage when playing blindfold You have a clearly higher risk of blundering when playing blindfold Let me try to expand on this. Playing blindfold in a single game for more than an hour for the entire game is a huge effort of concentration. Playing blindfold for two or more hours on a single ...


4

This is more a comment than an answer. The attached fragment is Mikhail Tal commenting his blindfold simul against 10 first category (approximately 1800-2000 Elo) players - as the match goes, board by board. The fragment is a part of 1968 documentary on limits of human mental abilities. The movie is in Russian; if there is an interest, I may try to ...


4

I think it is ridiculous to assume that someone's normal rating would in any way be indicative of their blindfold rating. Your understanding of chess and ability to play with the chess pieces in front of you has little to do with your ability to hold all of the information in your head. The only assumptions you can make are: A) a person isn't going to be ...


4

You certainly do not remember all the moves made. Instead you remember the position on the board. In chess you have certain typical structures, so you don't really need to remember each and every piece's position. Instead you can for instance store the information: fianchettoed bishop to mean the very typical position of pawns on f2,g3,h2 bishop on g2 and ...


4

Chess24.com allows you to play blindfold in a different way by just hiding the pieces. When you want to move you drag an invisible piece in the normal way. When your opponent moves you see a line on the board connecting the starting and ending squares of the move.


4

In addition to Brian's answer about chess24.com. You can play blindfold chess too at chess.com Here are the instructions how to activate blindfold on chess.com: Tools Options Designs Board Colors Select BlindAll from the drop down menu for pieces Then apply. More info can be found here


4

In addition to the other answers, lichess allows you to do this. Select the menu (three stacked lines to the right of your profile name), select Preferences, select Game Display, and at the bottom turn on Blindfold Chess.


4

Try https://www.tryit.in/blindchess. It's a very simple interface where you can play against an engine at different difficulty level by just keying in the moves in algebraic notation and see the board as and when you want. Full disclosure: I am the tool developer! :)


4

This question involves the human mind's memory, so to start, let's play a quick game. Look at the line below for 1 second, and then look away immediately. G R T A O H V I L P Now try to recall as many of the letters as you can. Now do the same thing for the next line (look for 1 second): Fish Table Plate Water Mouse Cookie Scroll Piece Fan Ball Recall ...


4

I am the author of the software that you might be needing. For example, it is possible to set up an exercise like this https://szachydzieciom.pl/?page_id=5216&lang=en#6 where the task is to replay blindfold from the score the famous opera game. The score need not be shown, it's just an option. It need not be blindfold, either, it's just an option. I can ...


3

I used to try to imagine the whole board and it always seemed my mind would focus more narrowly. Then, one time when I was doing an exhibition in public versus just one opponent, I suddenly saw the chessboard a different way: it was floating in darkness and the board was translucent, so I could move around the board and see it (and the pieces) from different ...


3

Online: Lichess and Internet Chess Club provide an online functionality to play blindfold chess and you can try to make a suggestion on their forums to organize a blindfold tournament. This will probably be unofficial though and I do not now if that fills your expectations. Local: As @JossieCalderon said in his comment, you don't lose anything to make a ...


3

They memorize the position on each table; In this kind of event, they simply don't have the time to spend to much time on each position. Also trying to re-create the position like this is not practical when you play blindfold chess If you want to know (almost) everything on blindfold play, check out this great book on http://www.blindfoldchess.net/ Cheers!...


3

I have a USCF of around 1500 and I can play blind, so if that's what you're looking for it shouldn't be overly difficult. I did have to push myself a little though. I want to try multiple boards, we'll see.


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