22

I always like to explain this in a visual way. Basic Idea: Keep the bishops together. They form a large net (restricted area) from which the opponent king cannot escape. Step 1: Push Opponent's King To Edge Rank or File Keeping the bishops together and using the king for support, make the restricted area smaller to push the opponent's king back to an ...


19

Black is winning handily from the diagram position, and has a fairly straightforward strategy going forward: force the b-pawn's advance to b2 with the support of the bishops (starting with 1...Be6 to gain control of the b3 square), and then slowly push for a new queen, making use of the facts that (1) White must always keep guard over b1, and (2) Black has ...


15

Actually, looks to me like black is winning. For example: 8/5pk1/6p1/2pQ1b2/1p1b1P2/5K2/8/8 b - - 0 1 1... Be6 2. Qb7 b3 3. f5 {only move - opening black's position up} gxf5 (3... Bxf5?!) Kf4 b2 {now black has to escape queen's checks...} From here, white can go on with some checking sequence, but it looks to me that black will be able to escape a draw by ...


14

Some things that are probably part of the answer, but probably not complete and concrete enough: 1...a6 won't come. There is no threat to a pawn on e5, the knight isn't pinned, the only point of 3.Bb5 is to exchange it on c6. So black doesn't waste a tempo on forcing white to do what he was already going to do. On the other hand, black has a choice to make,...


11

This is one of the well known endgames and the side with the queen almost always (92% positions) wins, although some wins take more than 50 moves with perfect play. See the solution for your position here by entering your position into the diagram. I must point out that every move has been taken into account and every possible continuation has been ...


7

Black would be thrilled if White exchanged his perfectly-placed knight on d5 for Black's bad bishop on f6. 12...Bg5 brings it to a diagonal where it's actually doing something and also makes it possible to eventually play ...f5, undermining the pawn supporting White's knight. White doesn't play Nxf6 earlier because he'd be exchanging a well-placed piece for ...


7

A few things: 1) White's actually not wasting any tempi. He has to move his bishop out anyway (in order to castle). Then, once on b5, taking on c6 doesn't waste a tempo since Black has to spend a tempo recapturing. 2) The doubled c-pawns are more of a big deal than they'd be in, say, the Ruy Lopez Exchange variation. Since Black has a pawn on c5 instead of ...


6

Please note that the ...e5 push Black does on your line is not forced and there are plenty of other variations Black can opt for (like 4...e6, or 4...g6, or 4...Nf6 5.Nc3 d6, or even 4...e5) Each of this alternatives requires White to be prepared as Black will probably know a lot of theory about those (and have a good understanding of the resulting ...


6

Try Syzygy tablebase: https://syzygy-tables.info/?fen=8/8/5b2/8/K7/8/k7/1b1N4_w_-_-_0_1 Please ignore DTZ if you don't know what it is, look at DTM. It's checkmate in 139 piles with perfect play. No, the position is drawn under the FIDE 50-move rule.


5

What you're referring to is a so-called "7-man" ending (2 kings, 1 queen and 4 bishops). Luckily for you, we have 7-man tablebases which are even available online and which allow us to analyze every possible legal 7-man chess ending. [FEN "1q1k4/8/8/8/B7/1B6/1B6/2B1K3 w - - 0 1"] Randomly setting up the above position shows that white is indeed winning, ...


4

A lot of it is simply to create an imbalance. Nakamura has mentioned this before about a different opening B-for-N trade, and sometimes it is done without even getting doubled pawns in return, like an early Bg4 in the Slav then putting the pawns on c6 d5 and e6 to retain some control of the light squares. Even in the Caro-Kan Two-Knights variation you see ...


4

In general, the two bishop advantage is worth half a pawn, while double pawns are only a minor disadvantage. Sometimes doubled pawns can be an advantage if they do not block your pieces and control important squares. OTOH, creating doubled isolated pawns on a half open file is likely to be worth the loss of a two bishop advantage. Long term imbalances that ...


4

The main reason is that White does not want to face Nd4in many lines. They want to make sure they will "hurt" Black's pawn structure with Bxc6. Compare this line with others where the Black knight is actually pinned, like 3...d6 for instance. There, White has no reason to hurry and trade so quickly


3

More often than not, the Bishop pair will compensate for doubled pawns in an endgame. Your unopposed bishop would have to be pretty bad (and therefore your overall position) if it's influence did not compensate. In general doubled-pawns are not that bad if you have active piece play. Look at the games from the Kasparov-Short world championship match. ...


3

I take it that you feel that you are at a disadvantage because you have a bishop and a knight against a bishop pair in a reasonably open position. (If the position were closed, having the knight might be an ADvantage.) Most likely, your knight would be pinned by one of the opposing bishops, and this pin would result in a doubled pawn. I can think of two ...


3

The basic idea is to constrain the enemy king with the bishops working together on a pair of diagonals, just as with a rook you work with ranks and files to push the enemy king to the side of the board. With two bishops you need to drive the king to one of the corners. We'll first start with the ending moves to know where you want to go. [Event "?"] [Site ...


2

The bishop pair is usually stronger than B+N or N+N. While doubled pawns are usually weaker than two adjacent pawns. My advice is to look at the pawn structure and king placement to guide your decision whether to allow your opponent to exchange a bishop for your knight and leave you with a doubled pawn. Let's start with the Spanish system [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2....


2

In the Sveshnikov variation, Black concedes positional advantages (weak pawn in d6, and outpost in d5) for dynamical play based on: active pieces, pawn break (...f5) and dark-square play. Indeed, White gives up their black square bishop early in the game meaning that they may lack of pieces controlling black squares. It seems not appealing to exchange the ...


2

I would suggest running Tablebase on the position - the program can calculate exactly how many moves until the end, provided there are six or less pieces. In practical play, it is one of those endgames that borders on the brink between a draw and a win. It should be a draw with constant perfect play, but in practice it is much easier to win with the 2 B's ...


1

Obviously the Rossolimo is a less ambitious option than the Open Sicilian. It is, however, easier to learn for white, less risky and less sharp and so likely to be less the cup of tea of ardent Sicilian players. Those are probably the main reasons for its popularity.


1

It depends on the position, but a bishop is generally considered strong of play is on both sides of the boards and it's an open board. I would think that a sample position would help to understand what are you trying to point out.


1

http://www.thechessworld.com/resources/nalimov-endgame-tables Per Nalimov Endgme Tablebases the endgame of K+2B vs. K+N is a force win for the 2Bs in a maximum of 67 moves.


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