16

This was a great game! Hou Yifan brilliantly outplayed her opponent Fabiano Caruana in a very positional middle game, and mind you using the Petroff's defence in the opening, which is Caruana's specialty by any stretch of the word! The endgame was very tricky, and Caruana proved his resilience and held the game to a draw in a very resourceful way, despite ...


9

Assuming it is even white to move there, the real question is can white avoid the loss, and I would say the answer is "no". White is down two pawns, and black has the means to create passed pawns on both wings. This is just lost.


9

You cannot get a definitive answer, but in all likelihood, 99.99% it is a draw no matter who is to move (I am the type of person, who never says I am positive unless there is 100% proof, and that is impossible here, however likely). The overwhelming factor in this position is that the black bishop does not control the a1 square, so even if white had no ...


9

The key here is zugzwang - White has an ideal defensive position at the moment, his king stops yours penetrating, his bishop covers the weak pawns on g4 and c4, and the pawn on a5 you can't easily get at is it is on a black square. BUT when white has to move he will either have to move his king (letting your king in), or move his bishop (leaving a pawn ...


8

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. The game position you show is not a draw because there are series of legal moves ending in checkmate for either side. [FEN "8/1k1b4/...


8

You left out THE single biggest factor in the position, at least initially: The knight has zero mobility. That said, she did, indeed miss two opportunities to win involving a queening scenario, but they were very tricky for a human. I remember this endgame when they played it, and now, the winning idea comes back to me. [Event "Grenke Chess Classic 5th"] ...


7

Yes this should be drawn because: White has pawns only on one side of the board, and thus cannot overload the bishop (which can sometimes be achieved if you have pawns on both flanks). Black king is well positioned to blockade the pawn advance, and in particular preventing the white king to get to c5 and cover the two connected passers. b5 will always we ...


5

My understanding is that we call a bad bishop a "big pawn" especially in the endgame to emphasize the fact that the bishop cannot be considered a full piece in these situations. It can't move much. It is very passive. Having such a bishop is a long term handicap. You are right, these situations can also occur earlier in the game, but there is always a hope ...


4

Two pawns down you are doing well to get a draw. Your best chance is an opposite-coloured bishop endgame. At all costs you must prevent black from exchanging bishops or exchanging knight for light-squared bishop when you will be completely lost. What you have going for you in the starting position is that black's knight is badly placed on the edge of the ...


3

The key point in this endgame is that the bishops are of opposite colours. It is a trivial draw. White is a pawn up but with nothing more than barely competent play by black, white will never be able to advance his pawns. The black king can never be moved from b7 and the black bishop can take station on the diagonal between c6 and h1 making the pawn move c6 ...


2

Analysis by an engine shows at least 3 moves valuated around -1.0, so a draw is expectable. The engine went to Depth 36 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.86"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/8/6P1/P6n/1PB5/2K1B3 w - - 0 1"] 1.Be4 b6 2.b4 a5 3.bxa5 Bxa3+ 4.Kc2 bxa5 5.Bxa5 Bd6 6.Bd5+ Kf8 7.Bc3 Nf4 8.Bf3 Kf7 9.Kd2 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.91"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/...


1

Is it a win or a draw? The position from the diagram is a dead draw. How can White win? [Title "White wins with queenside pawns"] [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "8/1k5p/1P3pp1/K1P2b2/5P1P/8/8/2B5 b - - 0 1"] 1...Bg4 2. f5 {No matter how Black captures the pawn, White plays Bb2 and gets the f6 pawn} Bxf5 3. Kb5 Bg4? {I am just setting ...


1

It is rather easy to just chuck this position into a chess engine to determine the result, but let's try to manually to improve our analysis skills. Clearly, White is up one pawn with two connected passed pawns. These pawns are threatening to check agter White moves their king to b5, and push dawn the Black king to do so. But these pawns are easily ...


1

Analysis with Houdini 6.02 signal a win for White(+4.53)at d= 41/103 after more than a quarter hour of analysis. The winning method is complicated though , and White should start with 1 Bg2. Thanks. A demo (analysis included for pure curiosity in my program )with New Engine gives + 5.58 at d= 56 , which confirms the endgame is slowly winning for White.


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