35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


8

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. The game position you show is not a draw because there are series of legal moves ending in checkmate for either side. [FEN "8/1k1b4/...


6

If you look closely, the bishop only attacks on squares of a specific color (in this case, it's a light square bishop). As long as the opponent king steps on dark squares, it's impossible to 'check'mate the opponent king. During the endgame with very few pawns on the board, it is most likely best to sacrifice your piece for an opponent's pawn, as they have ...


5

My understanding is that we call a bad bishop a "big pawn" especially in the endgame to emphasize the fact that the bishop cannot be considered a full piece in these situations. It can't move much. It is very passive. Having such a bishop is a long term handicap. You are right, these situations can also occur earlier in the game, but there is always a hope ...


3

The key point in this endgame is that the bishops are of opposite colours. It is a trivial draw. White is a pawn up but with nothing more than barely competent play by black, white will never be able to advance his pawns. The black king can never be moved from b7 and the black bishop can take station on the diagonal between c6 and h1 making the pawn move c6 ...


2

Generally, when asking how to win a game, you will ask for a particular player. For example, you can ask: How can White win this game? In fact, that seems to be what you are really asking here. However, this position is a dead position: neither player can achieve checkmate through legal moves, no matter how badly the other player plays. Under FIDE (World ...


1

This position is almost certainly a draw. Black's next move could be Ba8, blocking the a7 pawn and putting the bishop out of harm's way. So how would White proceed from there? One possible White plan is to promote the a7 pawn. But the promotion square is light-colored, so it cannot be supported by the White bishop. To get support from the king, White needs ...


1

The analysis of this position seems quite reasonable based off an immediate glance of the board. Grachev has the advantageous position as he is first to move in this position which is essential for this end game play out. The c5 pawn is key to Grachevs success and without playing out the whole game immediately moving to defend it with the King is the most ...


1

Is it a win or a draw? The position from the diagram is a dead draw. How can White win? [Title "White wins with queenside pawns"] [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "8/1k5p/1P3pp1/K1P2b2/5P1P/8/8/2B5 b - - 0 1"] 1...Bg4 2. f5 {No matter how Black captures the pawn, White plays Bb2 and gets the f6 pawn} Bxf5 3. Kb5 Bg4? {I am just setting ...


1

It is rather easy to just chuck this position into a chess engine to determine the result, but let's try to manually to improve our analysis skills. Clearly, White is up one pawn with two connected passed pawns. These pawns are threatening to check agter White moves their king to b5, and push dawn the Black king to do so. But these pawns are easily ...


1

Analysis with Houdini 6.02 signal a win for White(+4.53)at d= 41/103 after more than a quarter hour of analysis. The winning method is complicated though , and White should start with 1 Bg2. Thanks. A demo (analysis included for pure curiosity in my program )with New Engine gives + 5.58 at d= 56 , which confirms the endgame is slowly winning for White.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible