16

This was a great game! Hou Yifan brilliantly outplayed her opponent Fabiano Caruana in a very positional middle game, and mind you using the Petroff's defence in the opening, which is Caruana's specialty by any stretch of the word! The endgame was very tricky, and Caruana proved his resilience and held the game to a draw in a very resourceful way, despite ...


11

This is one of the well known endgames and the side with the queen almost always (92% positions) wins, although some wins take more than 50 moves with perfect play. See the solution for your position here by entering your position into the diagram. I must point out that every move has been taken into account and every possible continuation has been ...


10

With new analysis from user AlwaysLearningNewStuff, we can conclude this is a win for white, The first critical position appears after 1.Be2 Kb7. [FEN "2k5/5b2/p7/P1p2p1p/P4P1P/2K2B2/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Be2 Kb7 Black defends everything at the moment, but the only moves that keep the position are Kb7-a7-b7. A simple triangle maneuver ...


10

I interpret the question as follows How can a player arrive at ...Bh3? This is tightly connected to the point behind ...Bh3. With a material advantage, black is clearly looking for a win. Yet, it is well known that opposite colored bishops give the defending side a strong chance to draw. Thus, precise play is required. Black's plan is Get the king to ...


9

You cannot get a definitive answer, but in all likelihood, 99.99% it is a draw no matter who is to move (I am the type of person, who never says I am positive unless there is 100% proof, and that is impossible here, however likely). The overwhelming factor in this position is that the black bishop does not control the a1 square, so even if white had no ...


9

Assuming it is even white to move there, the real question is can white avoid the loss, and I would say the answer is "no". White is down two pawns, and black has the means to create passed pawns on both wings. This is just lost.


9

What a great endgame to analyze! Where should I start with??? What was the point of Shirov's 47…Bh3? We know that 3 healthy pawns win against a bishop in endgame. Tablebases show the following endgame as won for Black , if it is his turn to move, by playing Kf5 ( the only winning move!) : [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "8/8/4kp2/3p4/p7/2B5/8/6K1 b - - 0 1"] ...


9

The key here is zugzwang - White has an ideal defensive position at the moment, his king stops yours penetrating, his bishop covers the weak pawns on g4 and c4, and the pawn on a5 you can't easily get at is it is on a black square. BUT when white has to move he will either have to move his king (letting your king in), or move his bishop (leaving a pawn ...


8

How do you draw in an opposite color bishops endgame with two pawns down? Fortress is your only chance in such a position. You must base your defense on the color of your bishop. Make your bishop a "bad bishop", so he can defend your pawns, if you have any. You will stop opposing passed pawns by controlling the diagonal that is the same color as your ...


8

There are a lot of cases where two pawns is not enough to win an opposite bishops ending, but generally it depends on the position. If the defending side manages to block the pawns on the color of the attacking bishop (like @BlindKungFuMaster's position), it is usually a draw. Especially when they are on the same diagonal, as then zugzwang is less likely. ...


8

Yes, if the pawns can be blockaded it's often an easy draw. One example: [fen "8/4k3/4P3/3P4/2B1K3/b7/8/8 w KQkq - 0 1"] As long as the black bishop controls d6, the pawns aren't going anywhere. But two pawns are two pawns. If they are farther apart and far progressed often one pawn wins the bishop and the other pawn wins the game, or one pawn sacrifices ...


8

You left out THE single biggest factor in the position, at least initially: The knight has zero mobility. That said, she did, indeed miss two opportunities to win involving a queening scenario, but they were very tricky for a human. I remember this endgame when they played it, and now, the winning idea comes back to me. [Event "Grenke Chess Classic 5th"] ...


8

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. The game position you show is not a draw because there are series of legal moves ending in checkmate for either side. [FEN "8/1k1b4/...


7

It takes at most 33 moves to win this endgame from any position (excluding positions where bishop or knight can be captured). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_and_knight_checkmate and references there. So, no, a forced draw is not possible in this endgame. However if the defending side is playing perfectly (e.g. an engine with tablebase), it could ...


7

Yes this should be drawn because: White has pawns only on one side of the board, and thus cannot overload the bishop (which can sometimes be achieved if you have pawns on both flanks). Black king is well positioned to blockade the pawn advance, and in particular preventing the white king to get to c5 and cover the two connected passers. b5 will always we ...


7

This endgame is a clear draw. Black simply has to maintain his king on f8 and keep the bishop alive and White cannot make progress. The only way White can win this position is if he can either capture Black's bishop and promote the f-pawn or simply promote his f-pawn. Capturing the g-pawn is not enough to win. If Black plays correctly, the Black bishop ...


6

If White tries to hinder your plan by exchanging the bishops he loses the pawn endgame. I have provided brief analysis in the below diagram, see the sublines. Then I have tried to play this endgame with both colors versus computer. Computer chose 1...Kf8 as strongest but with some "only moves" I managed to save the draw. This is illustrated in the below ...


5

My understanding is that we call a bad bishop a "big pawn" especially in the endgame to emphasize the fact that the bishop cannot be considered a full piece in these situations. It can't move much. It is very passive. Having such a bishop is a long term handicap. You are right, these situations can also occur earlier in the game, but there is always a hope ...


4

Two pawns down you are doing well to get a draw. Your best chance is an opposite-coloured bishop endgame. At all costs you must prevent black from exchanging bishops or exchanging knight for light-squared bishop when you will be completely lost. What you have going for you in the starting position is that black's knight is badly placed on the edge of the ...


3

I'm not sure how to use this site's chess diagrams First off, to learn how to make chess diagrams here read carefully answers to this post. As for your question, I will give you brief comments about the game first, and then analyze the endgame. Also, any comments on my play/computer's play would be highly appreciated. Since SO hasn't added written ...


3

Obviously, white can't win. Let white do any move except g5+ (Kh5, for example) 65... g5 66. fxg6 Kg7 Now black bishop will move on squares c5 and g1 and white can't do any progress because pawns are blocked. Moreover, I like black's position more,


3

[FEN "4B3/8/7p/p1p1k1p1/P7/1bP1KP2/7P/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Be6 2. Bb5 h5 3. Be8 h4 4. Bc6 Kd6 5. Bb5 Kd5 (5...Bd7?? {White has an attack now} 6. Bxd7 Kxd7 7. Kd3 { Targeting both e4 and c4} Kd6 8. Kc4 {Threathening with Kb5} Ke5 {Only thing to do is counter attack} 9. Kb5 Kf4 10. Kxa5 Kxf3 11. Kb5 g4 12. a5 g3 13. hxg3 hxg3 14. a6 g2 15. a7 g1=Q 16. a8=Q {...


3

The key point in this endgame is that the bishops are of opposite colours. It is a trivial draw. White is a pawn up but with nothing more than barely competent play by black, white will never be able to advance his pawns. The black king can never be moved from b7 and the black bishop can take station on the diagonal between c6 and h1 making the pawn move c6 ...


2

After 1...Bd5, Black can win at least a pawn. White cannot take on d5 because that's a clearly won king endgame for Black- Black threatens to go Kd4-Kd3-c2 and take the pawn on b2. If White tries to defend with Ke2, then Ke4 from Black wins the g-pawn and the game.


2

It seems that member Dag Oskar Madsen was right, ...Kd7!, cutting off the White bishop's access to c8, is the winning idea. The only trap Black must evade is to lose the bishop after ...Ba2. Below is my analysis: [Title "White to move"] [fen "8/p3k3/1p2b2p/2pBPpp1/7P/P1P1K1P1/2P5/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Bb7 $8 { Every other move lose the pawn on e5. } ( 1.c4? ...


2

Is this same-color bishop endgame actually won for black? Black has faster king, but he has permanent weakness in view of the a4 pawn. His bishop is bad and kingside pawns are on the same color he is. Although kingside pawn formation can be changed to suit the bishop, he will still be unable to attack the opponent because White can also change his ...


2

This resembles another position referred to as the "Iron Duke." Based on my knowledge of the other position, I'd say that Black can draw. The reason is that all the potential entry points (on the fourth rank) for the white king are either occupied or "covered" by Black. There is a (blocked) White pawn on a4, b4 and d4 are covered by the Black pawn on c5, ...


2

Analysis by an engine shows at least 3 moves valuated around -1.0, so a draw is expectable. The engine went to Depth 36 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.86"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/8/6P1/P6n/1PB5/2K1B3 w - - 0 1"] 1.Be4 b6 2.b4 a5 3.bxa5 Bxa3+ 4.Kc2 bxa5 5.Bxa5 Bd6 6.Bd5+ Kf8 7.Bc3 Nf4 8.Bf3 Kf7 9.Kd2 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.91"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/...


2

Dvoretsky in Endgame Manual just calls this technique interferring. Building a bridge in RPvR endgames is slightly different as it is about sheltering your king from checks from the enemy rook, not about preventing the rook from sacrificing itself for the last remaining pawn.


2

A very interesting source is 100 Endgames You Must Know by Jesús de la Villa. Jesús focuses in most common endgames, with a very practical approach and only 100 pages (Spanish version) long. I miss the K+Q vs K+R ending here, but it's a very recommendable book. More comprehensive books, and also longer and more dense, are Fundamental Chess Endings by Muller ...


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