11

This is one of the well known endgames and the side with the queen almost always (92% positions) wins, although some wins take more than 50 moves with perfect play. See the solution for your position here by entering your position into the diagram. I must point out that every move has been taken into account and every possible continuation has been ...


10

I interpret the question as follows How can a player arrive at ...Bh3? This is tightly connected to the point behind ...Bh3. With a material advantage, black is clearly looking for a win. Yet, it is well known that opposite colored bishops give the defending side a strong chance to draw. Thus, precise play is required. Black's plan is Get the king to ...


9

Assuming it is even white to move there, the real question is can white avoid the loss, and I would say the answer is "no". White is down two pawns, and black has the means to create passed pawns on both wings. This is just lost.


9

What a great endgame to analyze! Where should I start with??? What was the point of Shirov's 47…Bh3? We know that 3 healthy pawns win against a bishop in endgame. Tablebases show the following endgame as won for Black , if it is his turn to move, by playing Kf5 ( the only winning move!) : [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "8/8/4kp2/3p4/p7/2B5/8/6K1 b - - 0 1"] ...


8

How do you draw in an opposite color bishops endgame with two pawns down? Fortress is your only chance in such a position. You must base your defense on the color of your bishop. Make your bishop a "bad bishop", so he can defend your pawns, if you have any. You will stop opposing passed pawns by controlling the diagonal that is the same color as your ...


8

There are a lot of cases where two pawns is not enough to win an opposite bishops ending, but generally it depends on the position. If the defending side manages to block the pawns on the color of the attacking bishop (like @BlindKungFuMaster's position), it is usually a draw. Especially when they are on the same diagonal, as then zugzwang is less likely. ...


8

Yes, if the pawns can be blockaded it's often an easy draw. One example: [fen "8/4k3/4P3/3P4/2B1K3/b7/8/8 w KQkq - 0 1"] As long as the black bishop controls d6, the pawns aren't going anywhere. But two pawns are two pawns. If they are farther apart and far progressed often one pawn wins the bishop and the other pawn wins the game, or one pawn sacrifices ...


8

With new analysis from user AlwaysLearningNewStuff, we can conclude this is a win for white, The first critical position appears after 1.Be2 Kb7. [FEN "2k5/5b2/p7/P1p2p1p/P4P1P/2K2B2/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Be2 Kb7 Black defends everything at the moment, but the only moves that keep the position are Kb7-a7-b7. A simple triangle maneuver ...


7

This endgame is a clear draw. Black simply has to maintain his king on f8 and keep the bishop alive and White cannot make progress. The only way White can win this position is if he can either capture Black's bishop and promote the f-pawn or simply promote his f-pawn. Capturing the g-pawn is not enough to win. If Black plays correctly, the Black bishop ...


6

If White tries to hinder your plan by exchanging the bishops he loses the pawn endgame. I have provided brief analysis in the below diagram, see the sublines. Then I have tried to play this endgame with both colors versus computer. Computer chose 1...Kf8 as strongest but with some "only moves" I managed to save the draw. This is illustrated in the below ...


6

It takes at most 33 moves to win this endgame from any position (excluding positions where bishop or knight can be captured). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_and_knight_checkmate and references there. So, no, a forced draw is not possible in this endgame. However if the defending side is playing perfectly (e.g. an engine with tablebase), it could ...


5

Actually this looks like a draw by the 50 move rule. FIDE 9.3 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by the player having the move, if: b. the last 50 consecutive moves have been made by each player without the movement of any pawn and without any capture.


4

Two pawns down you are doing well to get a draw. Your best chance is an opposite-coloured bishop endgame. At all costs you must prevent black from exchanging bishops or exchanging knight for light-squared bishop when you will be completely lost. What you have going for you in the starting position is that black's knight is badly placed on the edge of the ...


3

After white’s move 215. Bac6# The black king is now in check. All of the black king’s possible moves (d8, f8, d7, e7, f7) are illegal, since they result in check. The result is checkmate.


3

[FEN "4B3/8/7p/p1p1k1p1/P7/1bP1KP2/7P/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Be6 2. Bb5 h5 3. Be8 h4 4. Bc6 Kd6 5. Bb5 Kd5 (5...Bd7?? {White has an attack now} 6. Bxd7 Kxd7 7. Kd3 { Targeting both e4 and c4} Kd6 8. Kc4 {Threathening with Kb5} Ke5 {Only thing to do is counter attack} 9. Kb5 Kf4 10. Kxa5 Kxf3 11. Kb5 g4 12. a5 g3 13. hxg3 hxg3 14. a6 g2 15. a7 g1=Q 16. a8=Q {...


3

I'm not sure how to use this site's chess diagrams First off, to learn how to make chess diagrams here read carefully answers to this post. As for your question, I will give you brief comments about the game first, and then analyze the endgame. Also, any comments on my play/computer's play would be highly appreciated. Since SO hasn't added written ...


3

Obviously, white can't win. Let white do any move except g5+ (Kh5, for example) 65... g5 66. fxg6 Kg7 Now black bishop will move on squares c5 and g1 and white can't do any progress because pawns are blocked. Moreover, I like black's position more,


2

After 1...Bd5, Black can win at least a pawn. White cannot take on d5 because that's a clearly won king endgame for Black- Black threatens to go Kd4-Kd3-c2 and take the pawn on b2. If White tries to defend with Ke2, then Ke4 from Black wins the g-pawn and the game.


2

It seems that member Dag Oskar Madsen was right, ...Kd7!, cutting off the White bishop's access to c8, is the winning idea. The only trap Black must evade is to lose the bishop after ...Ba2. Below is my analysis: [Title "White to move"] [fen "8/p3k3/1p2b2p/2pBPpp1/7P/P1P1K1P1/2P5/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Bb7 $8 { Every other move lose the pawn on e5. } ( 1.c4? ...


2

Is this same-color bishop endgame actually won for black? Black has faster king, but he has permanent weakness in view of the a4 pawn. His bishop is bad and kingside pawns are on the same color he is. Although kingside pawn formation can be changed to suit the bishop, he will still be unable to attack the opponent because White can also change his ...


2

A very interesting source is 100 Endgames You Must Know by Jesús de la Villa. Jesús focuses in most common endgames, with a very practical approach and only 100 pages (Spanish version) long. I miss the K+Q vs K+R ending here, but it's a very recommendable book. More comprehensive books, and also longer and more dense, are Fundamental Chess Endings by Muller ...


2

Analysis by an engine shows at least 3 moves valuated around -1.0, so a draw is expectable. The engine went to Depth 36 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.86"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/8/6P1/P6n/1PB5/2K1B3 w - - 0 1"] 1.Be4 b6 2.b4 a5 3.bxa5 Bxa3+ 4.Kc2 bxa5 5.Bxa5 Bd6 6.Bd5+ Kf8 7.Bc3 Nf4 8.Bf3 Kf7 9.Kd2 [Title "Engine Evaulation: -0.91"] [fen "6k1/1pp1b1p1/p6p/...


2

Dvoretsky in Endgame Manual just calls this technique interferring. Building a bridge in RPvR endgames is slightly different as it is about sheltering your king from checks from the enemy rook, not about preventing the rook from sacrificing itself for the last remaining pawn.


1

No. Even if you got your opponent's king to a corner and checked it with your bishop, your king can control only two of the three flight squares. The most you could achieve is a stalemate, if your opponent helps. Therefore king and bishop vs king is considered a draw by insufficient material ("dead position" is the term used in the FIDE Laws of Chess; see ...


1

I mostly agree with the other answers, but want to make one distinction. Yes, for long-term strategic reasons it is generally correct to fix the opponent's pawns on the same colour as their bishop in order to restrict that bishop. However, for short-term tactical reasons the opposite is often true. You may want to fix some of the opponent's pawns on the ...


1

The normal pawn square color rule says: put your pawns on the opposite color. But there's an exception. So, the precise answer depends on two things: Are you playing, or are you trying to transition to, an opposite-colored bishops endgame? If so, and you are the attacker, you follow the normal pawn square color rule: put your pawns on the opposite color. ...


1

The chess training website http://chesstempo.com has an environment for training endgames against computer. The positions can be selected according to many criteria to design custom problem sets. There are only winning positions, with no exercises on fighting for a draw.


1

In the chessgym you can train the standard endgames against the computer (An account is not necessary). Generally playing endgames out against an engine multiplies the effect of just reading about it. Ideally you'll try to win a won endgame against an engine and only then you use the book to find out what you could have done better.


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