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The path to mastering the openings isn't memorising moves and variations, it's understanding why certain moves are played in specific positions, why certain moves are favoured over others. Memorisation is a shortcut to understanding, not a replacement. There are sharp offshoots of most opening systems that mean you have to be aware of certain traps and ...


3

You are right that memorizing tons of variations will be neither very helpful nor very entertaining. However, proper "study" of chess openings is much more than just blind memorization! The key is to learn the general principles and common patterns (strategical as well as tactical). This is what will actually enable you to "just play" in ...


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Remember.. No question is dumb It really depends which chess learning stage you are.. If you are absolute beginner , either sign up for chess lessons on some popular chess websites. Understand the basics of chess. How to move pieces , rules of chess , Openings , Middle Game and Endgame. Once you learn all that and become an intermediate player , learn about ...


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Naturally, clear is white and frosted is black. But it doesn't quite matter as these sets are meant to be aesthetic rather than functional. Edit: it appears I'm in the minority. I think of it more as clear and shaded. If the tint on the pieces were green, wouldn't the lighter (clearer) ones be considered white? In some chess books, the white pieces on paper ...


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Ive always done it in correlation with the squares on a glass chess board. The clear squares on the chess board look black where as the frosted ones look white, so it makes sense for me to use the clear pieces as black and the frosted pieces as white.


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I'm an older player (84), but in my youth I read several chess manuals which explained all the basics and gave hints for improvement, such as books by I.A.Horowitz, Fred Reinfeld and Reuben Fine. These are still available on eBay at reasonable prices. And there are certainly more modern books that cover the same area, by Bruce Pandolfini, Jeremy Sillman, ...


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