New answers tagged

1

It's not so much that Bxc3 is a blunder, as that not doing Qd6 is a blunder. Stockfish gives +4.5 to this position with White to move, and -0.4 after Bxc3, so Bxc3 compared to nothing at all improves your position by 4.1. It's just that Qd6 improves your position even more. Even if a move doesn't give up material, keep in mind that every move costs a tempo. ...


1

The pawn is actually a goner in any case after 1...Qa5 or 1...Qb6 - White can't play 2.c4 since Black can play Rxb2+, breaking the pin with 2. Kc2?? or 2. Kh2?? leads to 2...Rxb2+ 3. Kxb2 Qxc3+ and checkmate, and the pawn is attacked more times than it can be defended. The real difference is that if you take the pawn immediately, White can play 2. b3 ...


2

In addition to what Herb said, your rook on f1 is already perfectly placed; it lines up on the black king. Further, Rfd1 doesn't force any action. Thus Black has time to solidify his kingside. Indeed, in Stockfish's analysis, White returns that rook to f1 two moves later. And you are correct, f4 is a move that requires careful consideration. Good on you. ...


3

Positions with opposite color bishops and heavy pieces are known to be very complicated and double-edged. The tension between two sides can last for a long time because of continuous maneouvering of rooks and queens. Consequently, evaluation of the position depends mostly on the dynamical resources and weaknesses in pawn structure and not on just pawns ...


4

Because you have opposite-colored bishops and it's nearly impossible to win in the endgame. You can, however, take advantage of the weak white king. After 20... Bxc3 the game will most likely continue: [FEN "1r1q1rk1/p4pp1/3p1b1p/2pQ4/4P3/P1P2P2/1P2B1PP/1K1R3R b - - 0 20"] 1... Bxc3 2. b3 Bd4 This will you protect your pawn on d6. You've lost ...


4

You're not actually losing two points of material by playing Rfd1, but rather you're not gaining the advantage. You currently have 3 pawns for a knight, which is roughly even, however black is somewhat cramped for space, their knight is undeveloped, their king is under x-ray attack from both the bishop on a3 and rook on f1, and they have two isolated pawns. ...


2

I am very surprised that in this old thread absolutely no mention is made of visualization. We tend to assume that everyone thinks as we do, but perhaps more or less effectively. This is not true. Some people think visually, others verbally, logically, or kinematically. Those who do visualize vary in accuracy and clarity. See the Wikipedia article on "...


0

This is a bit late but in case you are still wondering - yes you can. We've been working on our blindfold chess website for the past few months and just released our beta. The entire purpose of the website is for people to learn how to play a full game blindfolded. We start by running you through basic PGN notation. You can get comfortable with this notation ...


7

The reason is that after 3. dxe5 fxe5 4. Qh5+ you are in a lot of trouble and already lost. [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. d4 f6 3. dxe5 fxe5 4. Qh5+ Ke7 (4...g6 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+) 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+


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