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22

It's a discovered attack with check (the rook attacking the queen is the discovered attack, the check is the discovering move). As the discovering move is also an attack, this gives rise to a double attack. The check must be answered, so the queen takes the knight even though it is protected. This could also be considered a desperado from White's point of ...


15

It's not uncommon that a tactical sequence makes use of more than one general pattern. Here, we have a double attack where one of these attacks is a discovered one (the rook on the queen) and the other is a decoy (the knight check lures the queen to a square where it will be undefended).


10

It's not the KIA at fault (in fact we saw here a color-reversed KID) but you both lacked when it comes to positional play. In the end position, Black is far better. He can act the standard queenside pawnroller while you don't have the slightest attacking counterplay, and a horribly bad bishop. But since so much material has been traded, Black probably didn'...


9

I think it is a discovered attack. Normally at a discovered attack, you do give a check to the king, eventually a double check. Here what is different is that you do a check to the king but you discover an attack on the queen, not also towards the king.


6

I feel some doubt about this book. It is self-published by writers who are not well-known. I am sure they have in mind 1..Qh4 with some followup like 2 0-0 Nf6 3.h3 (to prevent Ng4) Bxh3 4.Qxa8 Qg3. A much better defence for White is 2. d4! and I do not think that Black is winning at all. If 2...Qxe4+ 3.Be3 and Black must prevent Qxh7 so 3...Nf6 4.dxc5 and ...


6

In a position such as this, where White's army is kind of sitting back and you haven't castled kingside, you might try a pawn storm. For a first step you may play h6 or castle queenside, both of which are moves which are useful for a pawn storm that do not absolutely commit you to it, so you can back off if you don't like White's replies somehow. Here's one ...


6

To paraphrase Garry Kasparov "An attack truly begins when a pawn attacks a piece". It is often very difficult to conduct an attack with just the minor pieces (Knights & Bishops) and your queen. To really get an attack going you need to get your pawns and especially your rooks involved. So in the position you provided, after starting with the ...


4

The late Xavier Parmentier, a very succesful chess teacher, writer, and a leading figure in the French chess community for decades, focused on those lines in his calculation exercices and wrote about them in his book "Les secrets de l'initiative aux échecs" (literally: Secrets of Initiative in Chess), and probably in other works. He dubbed them &...


4

If each of the marauding pieces is itself en prise during most or all of the sequence, it can be called a desperado; see for example the Bogolyubov-Schmid game cited in Wikipedia's article on "Desperado (chess)": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desperado_(chess)#Bogolyubov_versus_Schmid


4

In the Caro-Kann, white dictates the speed and sharpness of play. The exchange Caro-Kann typically shies away from tactical/aggressive positions. In the advance bf5, white can play h4 which leads to very aggressive, open, and tactical games for both white and black. You're likely looking for the Advance c5 which is a little more forcing for black that you'...


3

In response to: 4.c3. This outright loses a pawn to 4...Nxe4. I have a hard time believing White will play this often. 4.Nc3. This move is tame, effectively accepting a symmetrical position with minimal advantage if Black plays 4...Bc5. Black does not have to acquiesce and could play 4...Nxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 giving Black easy development and a comfortable game. ...


3

The Traxler counter-attack starts if White plays Ng5 in this position. [FEN "r1bqkb1r/pppp1ppp/2n2n2/4p3/2B1P3/5N2/PPPP1PPP/RNBQK2R w KQkq - 4 4"] 1. Ng5 Without Ng5, there is no Traxler counter-attack. I think that 1.e4 e5 is not the best way of preparing an attacking and aggressive battle with Black. That is why I play 1.e4 c5 and go for the ...


3

First, to address your question, "So if I commit to the KIA with 3.d3 and my opponent plays 3...d6, not allowing any e5 push, I should just open up the position and be left with a slightly worse opening?" - I am tempted to say yes, play something else in this case but in no way you are "worse" after losing a tempo after, say, d2-d3 ...


3

There's a concept in chess called the equilibrium. Basically, things start off more or less equal, and both sides try to upset the equilibrium in their favour (i.e., gain an advantage). If one side makes a mistake and upsets the equilibrium in their opponent's favour, then their opponent is "justified" in playing in some way to capitalize on this ...


2

I agree with @DavidH, the best technical description is multiple (consecutive) zwischenzugs. As for a more specific term, I don't know an established one either, so maybe it's time to invent one. I propose to call the scenario you describe a caterpillar (line), after the famous picture book by Eric Carle, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. According to Wikipedia: ...


2

It would be an example of repeated Zwischenzugs, where instead of making the expected move (a recapture), each player makes an intermediate move—capturing a different piece. Zwischenzug is a general expression applying to any intermediate move; I don’t know if there is a more specific term for the scenario you describe.


2

I have found a nice line as Black which gives excellent attacking chances and rapid development at the cost of a double pawn. The line can be reached via the two-knights or classical mainline variations of the Caro-Kann and include playing Nf6, where it can be captured with a check. An example would be 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6+ exf6. ...


1

As far as I know, the short answer is no. I am no expert on the theoretical part and I will not go into it because it will require more research. What I do assume is that any player who plays the Alekhine Defense with the Black pieces has studied the Four Pawns Attack. Thus, it makes more sense to me from a human and psychological point of view to choose ...


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