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9

They are related, but probably not the same. If you play an opening like the King's Indian you are probably an aggressive, attacking player, but you may rely more on the understanding of the position than on tactical tricks. Similarly, there are certain types of position where accurate calculation is required but with defensive purposes. Aggressive and ...


8

Typically you use a pawn storm to exchange pawns around the castled enemy king and thereby to open lines and diagonals for an attack. Most of the time you want a closed (to some extent) center in order to avoid counterplay in the center. In this sense your example 4 is not a typical use case for a pawn storm. It might make sense to push the pawns here as ...


7

Avoid queen mating on g2 is easy: f3, Qg3, Qh3+ are decent options Re4, Kf1 also prevent immediate mate but are not good Winning this position is objectively speaking impossible. Black is up a piece and white does not have sufficient compensation for it. Most players would resign if playing somebody of 1800 strength or even less. If black is a beginner and/...


7

When asking questions about tactics and sacrifices, chess engines are usually the most efficient and accurate way of determining the answer. The following is based on analysis from Houdini 6.03 in tactical mode: By the end of move 24, in the following position, a forced mate (in 8) already exists for white [FEN "2rq3r/1R6/p3kp1Q/4p3/2p1P1PP/P1N5/2P5/4KR2 w ...


6

The main purpose of a pawn storm is to exchange pawns and open lines. Therefore, in the ideal case you should push the pawn that can easily be exchanged. With a Black pawn on g6, it makes sense to play h4-h5. The only way White's g-pawn could be directly exchanged would be if Black had a pawn on h6 (as is the case in your first diagram). However, g4 can be ...


5

With rook on g1, 13. gxh5 gives it a direct open file against the king. Wrong! The black king is not on the g file. It is on the h file and the rook on f8 is ready, if required, to come to g8 and fight for the open file. g5 allowed 13... Bg4, necessitating 14. Rxg4, an exchange sacrifice for the attack to continue. Again, wrong. 13... Bg5 14 Rxg4 hxg4 ...


5

It comes down to one main thing, but there are other factors that probably played a part too. The main thing is that despite the nature of the Marshall attack, it is considered drawish at the highest levels. At lower levels, of course, it is a double-edged game where anything can happen. And while they are double-edged, white is on the defensive, not where ...


4

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcKXwA_lo3Zpz3_Mc-WVLtw is the YouTube channel of Helmsknight. She is a strong player who plays with Nakamura, Seirawan, and many other high rated players. Interesting is that all these players tend to castle before starting an attack. Just like normal chess, starting an attack on this (these) square(s) is often a good ...


4

First, I think you are looking for a hard-and-fast rule that does not exist since it really depends on the position. There still can be some guiding factors. In the Karpov game above, which only lasted another 6 moves, it turns out that literally every white piece was an attacker, and was necessary for the attack to succeed, so the original question about ...


4

I'd play h4 in positions 3 and 4, without losing the g4 tmepo. As for 1 and 2, I'd follow the same criteria except if Black's ...h5 reaction is strong enough to give me a reason to play g4


3

I wouldn't call it a blunder, as White still has a large advantage after 1.b3. But more efficient is 1.dxc5 Bxc5 2.Bd2. Here White's attacking the knight, but has only spent one tempo developing his bishop. Your idea with 1.b3, 2.Ba3 would take two tempi. In this kind of position where the opponent's king is vulnerable, each tempo matters more. You want to ...


2

You can defend with Qg3 and Qh3 but the position is clearly disadvantageous for White, as they are one piece down


2

I can't give exact tips specifically catered to your gameplay as you have not provided information on how you generally open your games, but here are a few general tips. 1) Develop Bishops and Knights (get them out into a more accesable spot) 2) Control the center 4 squares of the board so that the opponent can't move their peices through the center (use ...


2

I noticed that it's very difficult to attack black in the Petrov defense. That is why it is popular at the elite levels: It is super-solid. The character of the game is going to depend on black, and the choice of where to castle. If black castles short, since white castles long, it is going to be an all-out pawn storm on opposite wings, and the person, ...


2

Kasparov is an attacking player. He is not going to go into lines which allow his opponent to attack. Nowhere in Kasparov's repertoire will you find him choosing to defend for material. He has a much greater advantage just avoiding forcing book lines where his opponent will obviously be well prepared. Lastly, he is not choosing the Spanish Torture, as ...


2

21.fg4?! leads to complicated positions that should objectively favour White but that Black often ends up winning in practice. After 21...Nxe4 22.Nxa8 Qxa8, at the price of an exchange you have broken White's pawn chain and can expect active piece play. The text 21.Nxa8! is much stronger and should have brought White a clear advantage if after 21...g3 he ...


2

First, it is highly unlikely that you will get a definitive answer here since computers are not great in these types of positions where the danger to white might be 10 moves down the road. It is also not uncommon for black to "lose" a rook in this opening, the Classical King's Indian, however, we often find that black's k-side attack is simply too strong in ...


2

That sacrifice could not have been countered once Re7+ was played, though on move 26 white could also have played Rb6+ since that would have won the black queen for free and is materialistically superior to Re7+.


2

In general it's a good idea, but to every rule there are exceptions. For example, if your opponent's king is safe (such as from castling) and he has lots of pieces around defending, sacrificing the knight on f7 may not be a good idea.


2

The position you are concerned about doesn't qualify as a stubborn Semi-Slav in my opinion. At most, it is a very passive Semi-Slav where the Nc7 lost two tempi to reach a waiting spot, and neither of Black's usual breaks, ...e5 and ...c5, will be attractive in the near future. Moreover, the hook on h6 has provided you with a very nice target. White has ...


2

In your example the game was basically played on the kingside only as your "pawn storm" did not get beyond the 5th rank. With or without pawn storm white would not really want to put pieces on the queenside. White made some strange decisions starting with Bh4. Likely a better plan for white would have been to develop pieces quickly (e.g. a knight to e4) and ...


2

You may want to take a look at some games with the English opening (after, for example 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3, where white rushes for a strong queenside attack based on Rb1, b4-b5. The Sicilian Defence (Classical, Closed, Najdorf, Dragon, Taimanov or Scheveningen variations also provide good examples) Some lines on the French Defence also have examples of ...


2

That is a beautiful checkmate, but I personally don't consider a pawnstorm in the opening or early midgame a really good idea, since its easy to penetrate and it loses in terms of development. But if you were to make a queenside pawnstorm, you could probably start with the queens gambit? You can probably push your queen pawns and still end up with a ...


1

Here is a demonstrative game to show how you should deal with a 'queen raid'. 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Qb3 Nd4 6. Bxf7+ Ke7 7. Qc4 b5 8. Qc3 Kxf7 9. h3 Bb4 10. Qg3 Gain tempo by attacking the queen, and attempt to launch a quick attack. c2 and f2 are spots to target.


1

I'm definitely far from the best chess player on Earth, but from my experience and lessons from coaches, pawns are almost always the best defenders, but not always. Watch for defended pieces, and your opponent trying to remove the defender of those pieces / squares to take advantage of the "hole" that's left behind. If you can piece together the kind of web ...


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