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11

I mean, this is the main line and for a reason. But I would be very surprised if most people's repertoire ended here, this is where it begins. The line goes 6.Bb5+ c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 And now White has a number of options. In all of them White stays up a pawn however Black gets some counter play. (and there isn't a great line to give back that pawn for initiative,...


10

It's not the KIA at fault (in fact we saw here a color-reversed KID) but you both lacked when it comes to positional play. In the end position, Black is far better. He can act the standard queenside pawnroller while you don't have the slightest attacking counterplay, and a horribly bad bishop. But since so much material has been traded, Black probably didn'...


9

They are related, but probably not the same. If you play an opening like the King's Indian you are probably an aggressive, attacking player, but you may rely more on the understanding of the position than on tactical tricks. Similarly, there are certain types of position where accurate calculation is required but with defensive purposes. Aggressive and ...


8

Typically you use a pawn storm to exchange pawns around the castled enemy king and thereby to open lines and diagonals for an attack. Most of the time you want a closed (to some extent) center in order to avoid counterplay in the center. In this sense your example 4 is not a typical use case for a pawn storm. It might make sense to push the pawns here as ...


7

Avoid queen mating on g2 is easy: f3, Qg3, Qh3+ are decent options Re4, Kf1 also prevent immediate mate but are not good Winning this position is objectively speaking impossible. Black is up a piece and white does not have sufficient compensation for it. Most players would resign if playing somebody of 1800 strength or even less. If black is a beginner and/...


6

The main purpose of a pawn storm is to exchange pawns and open lines. Therefore, in the ideal case you should push the pawn that can easily be exchanged. With a Black pawn on g6, it makes sense to play h4-h5. The only way White's g-pawn could be directly exchanged would be if Black had a pawn on h6 (as is the case in your first diagram). However, g4 can be ...


5

With rook on g1, 13. gxh5 gives it a direct open file against the king. Wrong! The black king is not on the g file. It is on the h file and the rook on f8 is ready, if required, to come to g8 and fight for the open file. g5 allowed 13... Bg4, necessitating 14. Rxg4, an exchange sacrifice for the attack to continue. Again, wrong. 13... Bg5 14 Rxg4 hxg4 ...


5

You made a mistake when transcribing move 7. It is 7. Qh5+, not 7. Qf3+. Move 10 is then Qh5f7, which is not blocked by the Nf6. [FEN ""] 1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 dxe5 5. Nxe5 Nd7 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qh5+ Ke6 8. c4 N5f6 9. d5+ Kd6 10. Qf7 Ne5


4

I believe you should go for 9.h4 in the main line: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Na5 6.Bb5+ c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 8.Bd3 Nd5 9.h4 White is trying to keep his pieces on active squares at all costs. There is a lot of complexity here, e.g. in the line 9...h6 10.Qh5 Qf6 11.Nh7!? Rxh7 12.Bxh7 g6 (don't play 11.Nxf7 hoping for 11...Qxf7 ...


4

I'd play h4 in positions 3 and 4, without losing the g4 tmepo. As for 1 and 2, I'd follow the same criteria except if Black's ...h5 reaction is strong enough to give me a reason to play g4


3

In response to: 4.c3. This outright loses a pawn to 4...Nxe4. I have a hard time believing White will play this often. 4.Nc3. This move is tame, effectively accepting a symmetrical position with minimal advantage if Black plays 4...Bc5. Black does not have to acquiesce and could play 4...Nxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 giving Black easy development and a comfortable game. ...


3

The Traxler counter-attack starts if White plays Ng5 in this position. [FEN "r1bqkb1r/pppp1ppp/2n2n2/4p3/2B1P3/5N2/PPPP1PPP/RNBQK2R w KQkq - 4 4"] 1. Ng5 Without Ng5, there is no Traxler counter-attack. I think that 1.e4 e5 is not the best way of preparing an attacking and aggressive battle with Black. That is why I play 1.e4 c5 and go for the ...


3

Julian Hodgson has elaborated on this in his book "Attack with Julian Hodgson 2". He calls it the attack statistics box. Another writer who uses arithmatic to calculate positions and moves is Shashin in his book "Best Play: A New Method For Discovering The Strongest Move".


3

Finder's credit goes to Akavall. Kasparov's explanation of how he calculated an attack against Karpov appears to be the origin of the quote I've seen referenced. youtube.com/watch?v=SMe-hvCwTRo


3

Sure! Playing a highly tactical position that you aren't used to can help you train your tactics, but there are plenty of non-gambit alternatives that are also rich in tactics (think for instance of most lines in the Sicilian defense)


3

I wouldn't call it a blunder, as White still has a large advantage after 1.b3. But more efficient is 1.dxc5 Bxc5 2.Bd2. Here White's attacking the knight, but has only spent one tempo developing his bishop. Your idea with 1.b3, 2.Ba3 would take two tempi. In this kind of position where the opponent's king is vulnerable, each tempo matters more. You want to ...


3

First, to address your question, "So if I commit to the KIA with 3.d3 and my opponent plays 3...d6, not allowing any e5 push, I should just open up the position and be left with a slightly worse opening?" - I am tempted to say yes, play something else in this case but in no way you are "worse" after losing a tempo after, say, d2-d3 ...


3

There's a concept in chess called the equilibrium. Basically, things start off more or less equal, and both sides try to upset the equilibrium in their favour (i.e., gain an advantage). If one side makes a mistake and upsets the equilibrium in their opponent's favour, then their opponent is "justified" in playing in some way to capitalize on this ...


2

In the Caro-Kann, white dictates the speed and sharpness of play. The exchange Caro-Kann typically shies away from tactical/aggressive positions. In the advance bf5, white can play h4 which leads to very aggressive, open, and tactical games for both white and black. You're likely looking for the Advance c5 which is a little more forcing for black that you'...


2

You can defend with Qg3 and Qh3 but the position is clearly disadvantageous for White, as they are one piece down


2

I can't give exact tips specifically catered to your gameplay as you have not provided information on how you generally open your games, but here are a few general tips. 1) Develop Bishops and Knights (get them out into a more accesable spot) 2) Control the center 4 squares of the board so that the opponent can't move their peices through the center (use ...


2

Yes. A direct open tactical style of play is the fastest route to chess mastery. Look at the games of Morphy. It allows to commit faster mistakes, therefore faster learning. Play dangerously


1

As far as I know, the short answer is no. I am no expert on the theoretical part and I will not go into it because it will require more research. What I do assume is that any player who plays the Alekhine Defense with the Black pieces has studied the Four Pawns Attack. Thus, it makes more sense to me from a human and psychological point of view to choose ...


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