81

According to the 2017 version of the Laws of Chess, rule 11.10 says: Unless the regulations of an event specify otherwise, a player may appeal against any decision of the arbiter, even if the player has signed the scoresheet (see Article 8.7).


27

You are absolutely allowed to call the arbiter when it is your opponent's turn. There are any number of reasons why this would be necessary. To start with the most prosaic, you have filled your scoresheet and need another one. You are feeling unwell and need medical assistance Your opponent has picked up a piece but isn't sure where to move it to. They are ...


25

The first thing to note is that the FIDE Laws of Chess are silent on this. Resignation at any time in any situation is allowed and immediately ends the game: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. Other methods of losing are qualified in some way. For example, checkmate is only valid if the ...


20

Yes According to the FIDE Laws of Chess 9.5.3 If the claim is found to be incorrect, the arbiter shall add two minutes to the opponent’s remaining thinking time. Then the game shall continue. If the claim was based on an intended move, this move must be made in accordance with Articles 3 and 4


18

Writing to FIDE will make you feel better but is otherwise a waste of your time. Let's step through and see why. First, getting up and walking around is perfectly acceptable behaviour. Here's what the FIDE Laws of Chess have to say - 11.2.1 The ‘playing venue’ is defined as the ‘playing area’, rest rooms, toilets, refreshment area, area set aside for ...


18

First, we cannot tell you what the arbiter should have done because we were not there and certainly don't have all the facts. We only have your version of events. What you say was very disturbing may not have been perceived as so disturbing to others there at the time. We weren't there, so we just don't know. We can't judge. As to what you should have done, ...


14

A short answer to the title of your question would be that you do not lose the right to appeal against any of the arbiter's decisions by signing the scoresheet. But also notice that you did not use your right to appeal anyway, therefore, you have, most likely, already lost it. Every tournament has an appeal committee and players wishing to appeal must do ...


11

If the arbiter really signed with your signature, instead of his, then he just committed a crime (forgery of documents). He could have signed with his signature as proof that he confirmed the result of the game and everything on the scoresheet. If the arbiter really forged your signature, then as a first step you should lodge a complaint against the arbiter ...


10

FIDE 12.6 says: It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. This includes unreasonable claims, unreasonable offers of a draw or the introduction of a source of noise into the playing area. There is no mention of this applying only on one's opponent's turn. "introduction of a source of noise into the playing area" ...


10

Is it really that certain that your opponent cheated? The key facts that I extract from your question: Opponent chatted with others on a regular basis I often do this too, and I do not talk about the game at hand just other things. As such I would say this does not even imply something going wrong. At some point the game was discussed, presumably too ...


8

There is no rule saying that you can call the arbiter only on your turn, or that the opponent is allowed to distract you during their own turn. If you want a more specific answer, you may need to give more details of the situation, for example what the nature of the distraction was. It seems a bit unlikely, but one can imagine some behaviour by the opponent ...


8

At this point you should report the Arbiter to FIDE and if applicable the USCF. You could even try to get the result of the game changed. They should have implemented Article 12.9 penalties followed by loss of game if it continued. Now that you have read the articles, you probably see that you could have pressured the Arbiter to implement the rules. [...


7

The first time you see a player doing this you should warn him and make him catch up on his time. If you are watching the game closely it is likely that there will only be 2 or 3 moves to make up. Note that he need not write after every move but must not make a move if he has not written his previous move. In that case, particularly with a blitz finish you ...


6

You must realize that no one may figure out a line like that over the board. This variation (up to 8. ... g5 9. Bh4) was quite popular in fifties, and for such an important tournament was obviously heavily analyzed. The Argentinians came well prepared with 10. Nf7. It turned out that Soviets were equally well prepared with 13. Bb5. A teamwork at its best. ...


6

The first thing to note is that for low level tournaments there is not even a requirement for a qualified arbiter to be on site. The arbiter must be a licensed arbiter (International Arbiter, FIDE Arbiter or National Arbiter) but is not required to actually be there. They can be at home watching TV. If there is a problem they can be consulted on the phone. ...


6

Incidentally I'm a national arbiter and a passionate player at the same time. Here is the rules side: FIDE rule 11.1 forbids the player to do anything bringing chess in miscredit. We have no yellow card (actually, I do have one in my arbiter kit, just in case :-) but insulting the arbiter definitely falls under 11.1 and is punishable by all the 12.9. ...


5

Suppose that, during a round of an official FIDE-rated tournament, I insult the arbiter privately (they notice), without distracting any of the other players. Could I get expelled from the tournament or lose that game? You are letting your solipsism get the better of you. As long as you have paid your entry fee for the tournament the officials don't care ...


5

What is the requirement for an arbiter in the below position if one party is seriously on time trouble say 2mins against 15seconds in a blitz tournament If this party claims a draw? If the arbiter happens to notice this position, can they call it as draw before the 50 moves rule is reached? No. Helpmate is still possible hence the arbiter cannot intervene. ...


4

Stewart Reuben's suggestion is to make use of article 11.3 a. During play the players are forbidden to make use of any notes, sources of information or advice, or analyse any game on another chessboard. However it is a stretch to describe what is going on as "analysis on another chessboard" You can debate whether it's "analysis on another ...


4

In your question you are conflating two different things. The first thing described is your first link about Derren Brown in which he plays as white game A, as black game B, and then, copies every move his opponent makes as white in game B, into game A, and vice versa exchanging colors. this effectively makes Derren just a "telephone" transmitting the moves ...


3

If the 50 or 75-moves-rules do not apply and there's a mating position, then the arbiter can't declare the game drawn. Here's what FIDE Laws of Chess say (emphasis mine): 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. ...


3

The chief arbiter is in practice no different from a standard arbiter - it is more a convenience in tournament organization. In many tournament there are so many players that it is necessary to have several arbiters, and of those usually the one with the highest title (often IA for professional or large tournaments) is considered the 'chief' arbiter who is ...


2

I found a decision by the FIDE Ethics Comission (FEC) that is interesting in relation with this question. In this case (Decision 2/2020), two players were observed talking during a competition. Afterwards, one of the players wrote on her scoresheet "Draw or I win?" There were also calculations of the tournament standing and the distribution of ...


2

From Chesslife, July 2016, "The Chess Multiverse" In http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1156906, After the fifth move, "Barden was wondering how to continue at this point when he looked up--and noticed that the same position had appeared on a large demonstration board behind his opponent's back." (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=...


2

This actually happened at the 2019 Isle of Man Grand Swiss tournament which, apart from lots of money, had a place in the Candidates tournament as the first prize. The players involved were elite players, Alexei Shirov vs Yu Yangyi on board 7, and sitting next to them on board 8, Sergey Karjakin vs Alexey Dreev. The Chief Arbiter, Alex Holowczak, made the ...


1

There are two significant changes. There is a re-registration requirement, although without having to also pay again. If you look through lists of inactive arbiters and check their arbiting records you find that many inactive arbiters have been inactive for not just years but for decades. In Europe there have also been new data protection laws for the past ...


1

Well I think copying should not be a matter of "cheating", because there are huge amount of opening variations and even if you copy some moves the opponent isn't likely to play the same move sequence. And even the opening lines are copied, aren't they? Some grandmaster or master plays the opening sequence (be it long time ago), you like it and play it. It is ...


1

What does the chief arbiter do? Here is what the FIDE Competition Rules say about the role of the Chief Arbiter: 3 The Chief Arbiter (CA) 3.1 The duties of the CA are as specified in particular by the Laws of Chess, General Regulations for Competitions, Anti-cheating Guidelines and so on. During the event he also: (1) has to keep the record of each round (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible