35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


30

50 points sounds huge, but there actually is no meaningful difference between -6.4 and -62 in such an endgame.* 6.4 is more or less "Black has a queen for a bishop (but I haven't found a way to make progress yet)" 62 on the other hand is "I have found that way to a position that is 100% won (but I haven't found a forced mate yet)" Why ...


25

The task you are considered is usually called a proof game, named such because the task is to prove that the position is legal. As a genre of puzzles, there are various aesthetic constraints, most commonly that the resulting game be unique. However, this is not necessary in general, and there is even a genre of counting the number of solutions. There are ...


24

Did black just play f5 before? Then the right move is exf6 en passant, Bxf6 Rxf6 Rxf6 Qe5+ and win the piece. [FEN "2b2r1r/2k1qpb1/2p1p2p/1p1pP3/pP1P1RB1/P1N5/2P1Q1PP/5RK1 b - - 1 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] [StartPly "3"] 1... f5 2. exf6 Bxf6 3. Rxf6 Rxf6 4. Qe5+


23

Whether or not to resign is a question of sportsmanship rather than strategy, I would argue. Just according to the rules, you are never forced to resign and can play on until you are checkmated. However, it is expected (to a certain degree) that you resign in a position that is "clearly" lost. There is no definite definition when a position is &...


23

You may be interested in the chess.com article 10 Positions Chess Engines Just Don't Understand, by NM Sam Copeland. If you don't like reading, there's a video by the author and another video of Hikaru reading through and giving his thoughts. A frequent theme in these positions are setups with long-term factors that engines are not aware of, in particular ...


22

Black would like to continue their development with Nf6 and castling short. g4 discourages Nf6; after g5, the knight is forced back. It also prepares Bg2, which protects d5 without giving up the pin on the e-file. The weakening of the kingside apparently isn't too much of a problem; Black isn't developed enough to take advantage of this, and White can always ...


22

After Qa4 Black can reply ...Kf8 if you capture there's ...Qd7 (pinning your knight and regaining it later) A continuation would be 1.Qa4 Kf8 2.Nxc6 Qd7 3.Bb5 a6 4.Nxe7 axb5


22

This sounds like a bug. Using Lichess's analysis engine, it takes Stockfish 14 less than ten seconds to find a mate in 11 moves. Both 1...Kg3 and 1...g1=Q lead to mate in 11. So there should be no difference in which move you start with, even objectively (of course as a human I'd go 1...g1=Q without thinking).


19

Consider the position before 15. Nc4. [FEN "r1b2b1r/ppp1k1pp/8/4p1N1/4P2n/1B1q4/PP1N1PPP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 0 15"] You have developed two knights, a bishop, and castled. Your opponent has developed a queen and a knight, and his king is stuck in the center. In other words, you have a massive dynamic advantage! You are already in position to leverage ...


19

Pawn structure. Allowing the exchange ...Nxf4 gxf4 simply weakens your structure considerably. The pawns on f2, f4 and h2 are disjointed and cannot protect each other anymore. Black can immediately start attacking f4 with a following ...Bh6, for example, and your only way to defend that pawn is by moving your queen into a pin. Due to the tactical danger ...


18

This isn't checkmate yet. Neither side is even in check! However, black is threatening to play Qg2, which would put white in check and there would be nothing to stop that check -- checkmate. So it's not checkmate yet, but it will be soon unless white defends against the threat somehow. And there is no way to defend against it -- white can block the queen's ...


17

Because black can play 12...Nd4 instead. The threat is to catch the bishop b5 with ...a6 and ...b5 and eventually ...c4. I do not see how white can prevent this. White loses a piece.


16

White threatens 27. Qf8#. Black has several ways to stop the immediate mate, so let's look at them: 26...Qc8? 27. Rxc1 Qg8 (27...Qxc1? 28. Qf8#) 28. Qxg8+ Kxg8 29. gxf6 gives back a decisive amount of material. 26...Qc5? 27. Qe8+ forces mate. 26...Be7 27. Rxc1 Qd7 leaves Black with a still-comfortable material advantage. 26...Rf1+ is a variant of the above ...


14

I believe there are quite a few distinct points to make to properly answer the question. @QueensKnight already adressed the "playing in a lost position" part of your question, so I'll focus on the "luck as a strategy" part. 1) Strategy hinges on reducing unknown or uncontrollable factors When making a plan to achieve a certain goal (in ...


14

considering my 41.75 per cent winning chance, how do I have to play in order to defeat my opponent if he/she and I both get a queen? First of all you need to understand what is meant by "41.75% winning chance". It does NOT mean that your chances of winning are 41.75%. What it means is that in 41.75% of the games considered the game ended in a win ...


13

I believe you are looking at an engine, and it's telling you is that black, with the correct play, will checkmate the opponent. It's not checkmate yet, but as the game progresses, white cannot stop checkmate. The engine is showing checkmate not because it's checkmate, but because black will eventually lead to checkmate. White can delay the game by giving up ...


13

At first glance, before concrete calculation: 1 Kh1 looks reasonably safe, the king is out of harms way for good. 1 Rf2 self-pins the rook and disjoints White's whole army with no obvious upside. Why play it over 1 Kh1? Looking a bit further, Black's queen is almost out of escape squares. However, the Rf1 is the only piece that can reasonably seal the trap ...


13

Despite the difference in evaluation, e4 is not really a mistake. White is a rook ahead and will win this game anyway, provided that they don't blunder. Perhaps Nxc4 leads to a victory a few moves faster, almost within the engine's search horizon; that's probably why the engine prefers it over e4. However, even humans should prefer Nxc4. If you're this far ...


13

Let's look at the position and try to evaluate the situation on the board. This is always a good idea, especially if you're struggling to come up with a concrete plan. r1b2rk1/4n3/p1p1p1p1/1p1pPp1p/1PnN1P2/2NB4/2PP2PP/1RB2RK1 b - - 0 1 HOW TO EVALUATE THIS POSITION? In this position black is a piece down for a pawn, so this in and of itself should be cause ...


13

Easy illegality is easy: not exactly 1 king on both sides, both kings in check, pawns on the final ranks. It's also fairly easy to tally promoted material and subtract the missing pawns. A quick captures test, together with the pawn structures, is also possible. An impossibility of last move test, even if only cursorily, is already tricky. A full test is NP-...


12

I wouldn't say it was a "sacrifice", it was more like an exchange of bishops. My lichess engine was actually giving me ...Bd6 as the first move. I don't understand why it wants me to move my bishop to b4 in the first place Me neither. I doubt anyone here will have an idea. Stockfish doesn't tell us why. If I have to make a guess, I would say the ...


12

This move creates several weaknesses, at f6, d5, and d6, and restricts the movement of the Bg7. The outpost weakness is usually shown by the game https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1257953. The d6 weakness is basically using all you pieces to attack the pawn and, once all of black's pieces on defending it, to shift the attack to another point and, ...


12

Besides Mike Jones' correct positional explanation, Black is also losing material at once after the simple 8.Ndb5. White attacks the d6 pawn, whose capture would also deprive Black of castling rights. 9.Nd5 followed by a fork on c7 is an even bigger threat ensuring that there is no defense: 8...Bf8 9.Nd5 Rb8 (what else ?) 10.Nbc7 Kd7 is awful, when the ...


12

Its evaluation drops form +2.3 to +0.0, so it considers it a blunder. Of course this does not match what a human understands as "blunder", but computers are incapable of identifying that. Your move is a perfectly reasonable one and if that's the biggest type of "blunder" you make in your games, you're on your way to a Grandmaster title.


11

[fen "2rq2kr/p1ppbp2/1pn1p1pP/4P3/3P2Qn/2P5/PP3P2/RNB1K2R w - - 0 1"] Is white in a weaker position then black? ... What are the key points? The key points are - White is a whole piece down for no compensation White has no attack White has no pawn levers The white h pawn is weak and black can round it up at leisure and take it In short, white ...


11

Just because Stockfish thinks a move is best doesn't mean it is best. But let's see why Stockfish might like it. When I look at Stockfish's static evaluation of that position, and move the king from c1 to b1, I see four sub-evaluations change. In order of the size of the change, those sub-evaluations are: Psqt bonus. This gives a bonus to each piece based ...


11

14.Nxd4 takes a pawn on d4, and it attacks the bishop on h5. So if black takes back with 14...cxd4, then white has 15.Bxh5, leaving white a pawn up (knights and bishops have roughly the same value). And if black wants to avoid this with 14...Bxe2, white can take back with the knight on d4 (15.Nxe2) so that it is safe too; again, white wins a pawn. And if ...


11

Very simple. Learn endgames. If you knew much about endgames then you would know that in rook and pawn endgames your rook belongs behind your passed pawn. Knowing that on move 39 you wouldn't have played the pointless Kd5. Instead you would have played 39...a5 with the intention of following this with 40...a4 41...Ra5 and then just keep pushing the a pawn. ...


11

"41.75% win" seems even worsely misleading. The value is technically true for a random position: some stats, but based on the immensely high probability that QxQ or a skewer wins on the spot. (35%, minus K protects his Q, for the capture alone, see below.) In a "neutral" position the chances are far lower - if you can't capture or skewer ...


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