10

Can black play for a win? Heck yes! This is totally won for black. I did not even realize you were up a pawn at first, and I was thinking there is a clear plan here. First, here is the analysis of the position. You are up a pawn. You have the better minor piece. White is weakened on the queen-side since black can put a piece on c4, and b3 is just horrible ...


8

The short answer is “no” due to the tactics after 16. c5 bxc5 17. dxc5 Nxc5? 18. Qb4 Qe7 19. Rdc1 winning the piece. This is a famous combination from some books I have read. The position is really a lot deeper than just that tactic, and it is worth mentioning that great move, and why Portisch played it. First, even though not all of this came to fruition, ...


4

Short of asking a deceased man, I would say that the answer is "no way". He won the 5th World Correspondence Chess Championship in 1965. Computer chess, if it existed at all, was not strong at all. Even with mainframe-type hardware back then, it paled on comparison to the first Chess Challengers of the early 1980's, and they were only rated about 1200 then. ...


3

The position is roughly equal. The problem for both sides, but it is a little worse for white, is king safety. That is the overwhelming positional factor here. Kg2 and Qd4 is the best plan for white here to counter the threat on f2. It is positionally mutually difficult to do anything since both queens and rooks must keep defending soft spots. Trying to do ...


2

Well, the obvious answer is that taking it leaves white with two connected passers (possibly after a future a6). That is incredibly strong since they control so many central squares, and threaten to advance strongly at any moment. This keeps the opponent tied down, and constantly worried about their advance. I once saw Joel Benjamin sac a whole piece just ...


2

When it comes to actual thinking I can only speak for myself. I think in descriptive notation. But there was no algebraic notation when I first played in tournaments. Algebraic was done to better communicate moves without error to more players in all languages. In descriptive notation errors were frequent because people are careless and do not ...


1

move queen to D6 THAT GUARDS F2 DUE TO CM


1

A qualified yes. I played in Philadelphia in the mid 50s and ran into a weird opening that is probably sound if not the best and had trouble with it. Turns out it was very popular in the Philly area but unheard of , back then, anywhere else. Now it is in opening books and even has a name.


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