42

As the old poem says: For want of a nail the shoe was lost. For want of a shoe the horse was lost. For want of a horse the rider was lost. For want of the rider the message was lost. For want of a message the battle was lost. For want of a battle the kingdom was lost. And all for the want of a horseshoe nail. Exactly the same principle applies in chess. ...


29

I'm not at all disagreeing with the existing answers - both sound. Indeed every pawn is a potential queen. However, one aspect of the question remaining is: why struggle for a pawn as opposed to a more decisive plan? In the games that you are watching, if they are between capable and well-matched players, very often the game will be quite well balanced with ...


11

Another point which has not been raised by the excellent answers above is that pawns are easy to block. A pawn can be blocked by just one piece in front of it, and it cannot take the piece which blocks it. Contrast this with any other piece, which can take a piece which blocks its movement (barring other circumstances such as a pin). This property means that ...


8

Currently e5 is not playable due to pawn loss. b3 is good as if ever e5 occurs after preparing for it with Nbd7, dxe5 dxe5 would make the long diagonal accessible to the bishop forever. In double fianchetto positions, an open centre is desired for maximum range of bishops. Obviously, It's not strict, e5 is a very important break in many dutch positions. ...


7

Avoid queen mating on g2 is easy: f3, Qg3, Qh3+ are decent options Re4, Kf1 also prevent immediate mate but are not good Winning this position is objectively speaking impossible. Black is up a piece and white does not have sufficient compensation for it. Most players would resign if playing somebody of 1800 strength or even less. If black is a beginner and/...


7

My plan was to keep the Black rook on the 5th or 4th rank to cutoff the White king and advance the h and g pawns. But then what? Your plan is a bad one. The general rule in rook and pawn endgames is: Your king protects your pawns Your rook attacks your opponent's pawns You can add another one: Push your passed pawns As you can see your passed pawns are ...


7

Preceding answers and comments make many good points. Why struggle for a single pawn? The simple answer is: Chess games are mostly won by material advantage! Generally being up a single pawn in an otherwise safe position is a clear advantage, often a winning advantage. In such a situation a GM analyst might say: And the rest is technique! Of course there are ...


6

Welcome! I am not 100% sure of what your are asking. Are you saying that Stockfish missed a draw by playing Bf8 as shown in the diagram ie there was some other move that could have drawn? Or are you saying Stockfish missed a drawing line later. Or are you asking in general where Stockfish went wrong in the game? If you look at the evaluations then Stockfish ...


6

The answer by @Brian Towers is both beautiful and true, but not always true. It is perhaps true if you think of every pawn as a potential queen. However, in endings, especially in Rook endings, the textbooks will tell you not to be drawn into passive defence but to keep your pieces active, and counterattack. That being said, you may not have the choice. ...


6

Your queen then attacks the undefended white d-pawn. Also, white is threatening Ne4 (attacking the black squared bishop), and after e.g. Bg7, taking on c5. If black took with the bishop, this would fork the white squared bishop on d7 and the undefended pawn on b7. If black took with the queen, black could simply take the d5 pawn and defend the b7 pawn while ...


6

At a cursory glance you see that... white is up a piece and a pawn, the black queen is pinned to the king and will be lost, white's pieces are much more active than black's white's king is safer than black's .... So no, there is nothing, really nothing in favour of black here. The only thing which needs to be checked is that Qxe1 is not mate, but in a ...


5

The main point is that 1...Nxf2 draws White's king out to the vulnerable f2-square; this allows Black to hold the balance. After 2.Kxf2 fxg4 3.Rg1, Black can give a perpetual with 3...Qh4+! 4.Ke3 (4.Rg3 can be met with 4...exf3, as Rxg7+ is impossible) 4...Qh6+ 5.Kf2 Qh4+. Meanwhile, 1...fxg4? 2.Qxe4 gxf3 3.Rg1 (hitting the g7-pawn) 3...Rf7 4.0-0-0 gives ...


4

Even simple games are full of possibilities. If you want to learn, you have to investigate these possibilities. Ideally without an engine. Some lines of investigation: What happens after 23.Bxh7 and Rxd7? What about 23.b4 cb 24.Bxh7? How does 26.Rd3 with the idea of Rg3 pan out? How does 31.Qxc7 Rxc7 32.Rd8+ differ from the game?


4

Another factor here: e5, dxe5, dxe5, Qxd8, then Bxd8, Bxf8 (bishop for rook) or Rxd8, Bxe7 (free bishop), and the pawn on e5 is still ungarded.


4

Of course this depends on the position at hand, but generally speaking... I am not a GM, but 100 positions (not moves) seems highly exaggerated, though this might depend on your definition of "position" and "analyze". If you really mean unique (and not only slightly different) positions, and if you mean by analyze, the full process of evaluating the ...


4

With such an overwhelming pawn advantage it should be easy enough to win. What you said is definitely a good plan. You can push h5 and g5 to push the king back. [fen "8/R4ppp/4pk2/1r6/8/5K2/6PP/8 b - - 4 38"] 1... h5 2. Ra4 g5 3. h3 Ke5 4. Ra2 f5 We can see here that black has an easy win. g4 is coming and once the pawns are traded, Black's two ...


3

You should think of pawns not as individual units but as a group acting as one unit. If one pawn is one "point" then the entire pawn formation is 8 "points". This actually makes pawns one of the most powerful units in the game. The pawns are your front line and do an excellent job of defending each other in diagonal lines. If your ...


3

It tells you at the top right. The first number (19) tells you the depth it has analyzed to (19 ply = 9.5 moves). Note that because of engine heuristics, it doesn't exhaustively search for every single move 9.5 deep. The second number (23) tells you the max depth to which the engine is searching for. After the bar fills up, there is an optional feature ...


3

This seems to just be a version of Chess960 restricted to certain openings to make castling more like "normal". Thus the positional considerations should be identical to regular chess, and regular chess principles (e.g. control the centre, develop your pieces early, gain space, etc.) should apply with equal force here. What does change is the pattern ...


3

With Black to move, is there a possibility to win in this position? Of course there is. If White's flag fell then this would be a win for black. Here is one simple winning continuation for Black [FEN "3rk2r/1p2q2p/1Q1p1Bpb/1R1N3n/1P6/5N2/1P3PPP/4R1K1 b k - 0 1"] 1... Nxf6 2. Nd4 Qxe1++ Of course the White move is very bad and only someone who is trying ...


3

Nobody is safe to answer this question unless he or she is a GM. You definitely need to search an answer in chess games. You can analyse by yourself or by using chess engines or you can easily find many videos on the internet. One of my favourites is the game between Vladimir Kramnik and Garry Kasparov when Kasparov sacrificed his Queen on move 12! It ...


3

All black pieces are currently defended but that does not mean there is nothing to do as if you play aimlessly white will eventually gain an advantage. On analyzing the game the first thing you can notice is that the kingside is completely locked down by pawns so our attack needs to be on the queenside. Ba6 and Be7 are good moves to start gaining control on ...


2

You can defend with Qg3 and Qh3 but the position is clearly disadvantageous for White, as they are one piece down


1

It is possible, if the computer program has a bug... A position is assigned a win-in-(k+1) only when one move from that leads to a loss-in-k, and assigned a loss-in-k only when every move from that leads to a win-in-k or when k=0 and it is a checkmate. So every correct chess program will never assign a position to win-in-12 and then later revise it to win-in-...


1

The position is resignable for Black. White is already up a piece, and is about to win Black's queen for a rook. Technically it's possible White could play some horrible blunder and allow Black to win, but this could be said about any position where the losing side has mating material.


1

...h5 is indeed good because it kicks the knight away from its current position (where it's a very dangerous piece)


1

Analysis with Houdini 6.02 signal a win for White(+4.53)at d= 41/103 after more than a quarter hour of analysis. The winning method is complicated though , and White should start with 1 Bg2. Thanks. A demo (analysis included for pure curiosity in my program )with New Engine gives + 5.58 at d= 56 , which confirms the endgame is slowly winning for White.


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