57

Yes, it can This particular knight's tour is closed, meaning that it starts and finishes in the same square. Therefore, the knight can start at any square on the board and finish on the same square, since it just starts at a different point along the cycle.


51

As the old poem says: For want of a nail the shoe was lost. For want of a shoe the horse was lost. For want of a horse the rider was lost. For want of the rider the message was lost. For want of a message the battle was lost. For want of a battle the kingdom was lost. And all for the want of a horseshoe nail. Exactly the same principle applies in ...


50

You have little chance in your dissertation of surpassing state of the art chess engines. Perhaps you could find a hook which hasn't been explored so much. One idea is to train your program to play amateur chess in a convincing way. Can a program pass a sort of chess Turing Test where a human-player couldn't tell if they were playing an AI or playing a ...


46

If you promote to a queen with 1. b8Q, black has: 1...Re2+ 2. Kd1 Rb2 attacking the queen and hinting at mate with Rb1++. If white takes the rook 3. Qxb2 it is stalemate. Because of the mate threat white does not have any other good square for the queen either (no good check and no square that would defend b1). If you promote to a rook, black does ...


40

This calls for some scripting, so here's my first hasty attempt at it ;) Here's a quick way you can do the search on your own in python, using stockfish 10 and only the python-chess package. All open-source and free-software! Briefly, what the script will do: Consider all 960 positions, one at a time For each position, it scans over all legal white moves ...


39

White is one tempo short of catching the pawn - if White could make two moves immediately it would be a draw as white would just take the black pawn. But they can't, so white has to find a threat which black has to respond to which gains them that move. The only threat they can make is to queen their pawn, and apparently black can stop that with their bishop ...


35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


33

I'm not at all disagreeing with the existing answers - both sound. Indeed every pawn is a potential queen. However, one aspect of the question remaining is: why struggle for a pawn as opposed to a more decisive plan? In the games that you are watching, if they are between capable and well-matched players, very often the game will be quite well balanced with ...


33

Mihail Marin simply missed that 1.Ng6 is winning, even faster than 1.Qg6. During opening analysis, and even during a game, sometimes when you find a satisfying continuation you forget to follow Lasker's advice and look for an even stronger one. This is a slight mistake in his analysis, but his evaluation of the variation remains correct (White is winning, ...


30

50 points sounds huge, but there actually is no meaningful difference between -6.4 and -62 in such an endgame.* 6.4 is more or less "Black has a queen for a bishop (but I haven't found a way to make progress yet)" 62 on the other hand is "I have found that way to a position that is 100% won (but I haven't found a forced mate yet)" Why ...


29

If the computer was capable of evaluating every line of play right to the end of the game, the evaluation would never change. Indeed, the evaluation of every move would be either "win", "lose" or "draw". This is essentially what happens in endgame tablebases.* If computers could do this for every position, every game against a computer would consist of the ...


26

Carlsen crushed it, made almost no mistakes whatsoever in rapid. It is as if he was playing at classical time controls. Chess is about not making mistakes. If your opponent doesn't make mistakes then you're only going to get a draw even if you play like an engine. He did play good moves as well. Example on move 37 the position is a draw but he gave himself ...


25

There is no hurry. After 8. Bb2 the bishop on b6 is not going anywhere. NxB continues to be available to white until black does something about it like a6. That means that delaying NxB gains a tempo if black has to make a less useful move to try and "save" the bishop like a6. Since recapturing with the a pawn probably gives black a better game it is worth ...


25

The task you are considered is usually called a proof game, named such because the task is to prove that the position is legal. As a genre of puzzles, there are various aesthetic constraints, most commonly that the resulting game be unique. However, this is not necessary in general, and there is even a genre of counting the number of solutions. There are ...


24

Computers allowed the creation of endgame tables, which allow the user to know with 100% certainty if a position can be won, and how to do it. Currently all positions containing 7 or fewer pieces are 100% known. I am unaware of any opening line busted by computers. Not that I know of, but computers do find answers to some hard questions. So while computers ...


24

According to the Lomonosov tablebases, it's mate in 40 for black. While the queen can't force mate by herself, she can force a zugzwang. In this case, when the bishop is forced to move to e8. Then, it's a matter of giving checks until the queen forks the king and bishop. One of the longest variations given is as follows: [FEN "7k/5BpP/3K2P1/8/8/8/8/4q3 w -...


24

It is a fairly short and simple explanation: They can combine to attack any square, not just squares on one color. As part of that they can also shift the attack better from one square to another.


24

Black wrecks white's pawn structure Black gains in development since he's trading an undeveloped piece for a developed one. Although the center is sill fluid, black's dark square bishop is currently a "bad" bishop. in the short run, white's knight is the more active piece. It removes the support of the c-pawn which opens up some tactical ...


24

Did black just play f5 before? Then the right move is exf6 en passant, Bxf6 Rxf6 Rxf6 Qe5+ and win the piece. [FEN "2b2r1r/2k1qpb1/2p1p2p/1p1pP3/pP1P1RB1/P1N5/2P1Q1PP/5RK1 b - - 1 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] [StartPly "3"] 1... f5 2. exf6 Bxf6 3. Rxf6 Rxf6 4. Qe5+


23

Whether or not to resign is a question of sportsmanship rather than strategy, I would argue. Just according to the rules, you are never forced to resign and can play on until you are checkmated. However, it is expected (to a certain degree) that you resign in a position that is "clearly" lost. There is no definite definition when a position is &...


23

You may be interested in the chess.com article 10 Positions Chess Engines Just Don't Understand, by NM Sam Copeland. If you don't like reading, there's a video by the author and another video of Hikaru reading through and giving his thoughts. A frequent theme in these positions are setups with long-term factors that engines are not aware of, in particular ...


22

Here's a simpler way to see why it's winning for black: You're right that the queen cannot checkmate the king by itself, but it can stalemate the king [*] (an example pointed out by Ionut Deaconu) and that's all we need here as that would force the bishop to move. Once the bishop moves it's clear that material loss is unavoidable as either the bishop [**] or ...


22

It comes with the threat of Qa8+, which forces black to return the knight. And white is up material, so exchanges are good.


22

Black would like to continue their development with Nf6 and castling short. g4 discourages Nf6; after g5, the knight is forced back. It also prepares Bg2, which protects d5 without giving up the pin on the e-file. The weakening of the kingside apparently isn't too much of a problem; Black isn't developed enough to take advantage of this, and White can always ...


22

After Qa4 Black can reply ...Kf8 if you capture there's ...Qd7 (pinning your knight and regaining it later) A continuation would be 1.Qa4 Kf8 2.Nxc6 Qd7 3.Bb5 a6 4.Nxe7 axb5


22

This sounds like a bug. Using Lichess's analysis engine, it takes Stockfish 14 less than ten seconds to find a mate in 11 moves. Both 1...Kg3 and 1...g1=Q lead to mate in 11. So there should be no difference in which move you start with, even objectively (of course as a human I'd go 1...g1=Q without thinking).


21

No, there are positions in which a lot of moves have the same effect or are the same but you can play them in a different order.


21

What's the purpose of this question & answer? I see a lot of misuse of engines in this community. I see topics where people do opening "analysis" by copy pasting engine outputs. Even worse, I saw opening "analysis" by copy pasting in first move! Lots of beginner in this community believe that engines give best possible move in every position, because ...


21

Is my dark squared bishop that important in this position or what's the idea behind this? Yes, your dark squared bishop is very important in this position. Your opponent doesn't have one, so yours is unopposed. Furthermore you have the minor advantages of the two bishops. Doubling your opponent's pawns isn't as big a plus as you imagine in this position. ...


21

Both moves lead to crushingly won positions for White, so all things considered it doesn't matter which one you choose. For me, Stockfish shows +14 for Nxg8+ and +9 for Nxd7. The difference between +9 and +14 is a lot less significant than the difference between, say, +0.5 and +2.5. About the material calculation you gave: Nxd7 costs two minor pieces for the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible