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Questions relating to the first few moves in a game

1
vote
1... a6 is a wasted tempo in most openings. If you want to fianchetto your queen's bishop, 1... b6 is a better choice. How bad is 1..a6? Well, because it does almost nothing, you're wasting a mo …
answered Dec 14 '16 by Glorfindel
7
votes
Basically, you have a lot of options left to transpose into other openings. I remember having read a book calling this opening the Franco-Indian for this very reason. I do not expect that many White … players will actually play 2. e4; they played 1. d4 for a reason and are usually not experts in the French opening. After 2. c4, you can: transpose to the Orthodox Queen's Gambit with 2... d5 …
answered Dec 20 '16 by Glorfindel
2
votes
I'll start with a quote about the Modern Opening from The Road to Chess Improvement by Alex Yermolinsky: The Modern Defense. This 'universal' method of solving opening problems has been widely … popularized recently. Some of its protagonists even claim that White has no way of earning the opening advantage after 1. d4 g6 2. e4 Bg7. Some statement, isn't it? By the way, it can hardly be …
answered Dec 26 '16 by Glorfindel
6
votes
 1. g3 is called the Benko opening or the King's fianchetto opening. It usually transposes into other systems where White plays g3 in the opening (e.g. the English or the Catalan), but the position … very soon. As most system openings, it is not really a bad opening. But you're giving away the initiative White has - essentially, you're playing with Black all the time. …
answered Jul 1 '16 by Glorfindel
4
votes
The main idea behind the Grünfeld is that Black momentarily concedes the center to White, only to attack it later. For example, in the Exchange variation, White often gets a pawn center (c3, d4, e4) …
answered Jun 27 '16 by Glorfindel
2
votes
This is actually quite common behaviour in the Nimzo-Indian defense. Black trades the bishop pair for either an advantageous pawn structure (e.g. in the Hübner variation) or a lead in development (lik …
answered Mar 27 '16 by Glorfindel
1
vote
. Remember that pawns cannot move backwards, so every time you move a pawn you lose control over the squares you leave behind. Also, if you're trying to play/invent tactical openings, you're better off starting with 1. e4. The open positions which arise from these opening offer more chance for tactics. …
answered Aug 28 '16 by Glorfindel
4
votes
question: if your opponent plays an 'odd' opening, you should indeed be fine if you develop along the general principles (but watch out for sudden tactics). …
answered Apr 11 '16 by Glorfindel
4
votes
White's best move seems to be 6. N1c3, when 6... d6 transposes into the Sveshnikov. After 6... Qa5, White just replies 7. Bd2, threatening Nd5 and Nc7. Black has nothing better than 7... Qd8 when Whi …
answered May 7 '16 by Glorfindel
4
votes
opening books will tell you what imbalances these lines create and how you can profit from them (often with example games played by grandmasters). Some examples of imbalances are: exchanging a knight …
answered Mar 18 '17 by Glorfindel
14
votes
Black usually reaches the Stonewall formation from the Dutch Defense (though QGD is an option as well, if he/she postpones Nf6) and involves putting pawns on c6, d5, e6 and f5. These pawns guarantee a …
answered Mar 20 '17 by Glorfindel
5
votes
You do not have to accept the gambit with 2... dxc4. This is chess, not draughts; capturing is not mandatory. (You know that, but this is a standard reply to gambits and other sacrifices.) Both 2... …
answered Nov 11 '18 by Glorfindel
2
votes
The main problem (at least on amateur level) of White in the Open Sicilian (i.e. 2. Nf3 and 3. d4) is indeed that you need to know a lot of systems/lines that Black can throw at you (see also this ans …
answered May 26 '16 by Glorfindel
7
votes
The issue is that 4. d5 is a much better move; White establishes a strong center with tempo and drives the c6 knight to a bad position. Besides, 3... Nf6 isn't that popular either (probably because o …
answered Oct 20 '18 by Glorfindel
7
votes
This is really dependent on which gambit the style of play you prefer. For 1, consider the King's Gambit. The theoretically preferred line for Black is 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d5! which immedia …
answered Jan 15 '16 by Glorfindel
7
votes
the black bishop). E.g. after 4. Nc3, Black can play the nasty 4... Bh4+, forcing the king to move to e2. The calm 4. Be2 works as well, but I feel it is less in the spirit of the King's Gambit, which is an aggressive opening. …
answered Jan 12 '17 by Glorfindel
10
votes
It is mainly so special because it can arise from many different openings, both open and closed, e.g. the Queen's Gambit, Nimzo-Indian, Caro-Kann and the Alapin variation of the Sicilian. It is simply …
answered Mar 19 '17 by Glorfindel
4
votes
If you're a Benoni player, there's nothing wrong with 2... c5, which will get you in familiar territory (3. dxc6 e.p. is harmless and not something White wants to play - exchanging a center pawn for a …
answered Apr 16 '17 by Glorfindel
5
votes
It looks like you arrived at this position with the moves [FEN ""] [StartPly "10"] 1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Qxd4 Nc6 4. Qd1 Nf6 5. Bg5 Bc5 White is already worse here because you're behind in develo …
answered May 24 by Glorfindel
4
votes
The King's Indian Attack isn't called the King's Indian Attack for nothing; it's White's version of the King's Indian Defense which is an opening for Black, characterized by the moves 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 …
answered Jun 30 by Glorfindel
0
votes
Opening trees are based on large databases with games played by high-level players. If a move has a 100% winning statistic for White, that means that in all games where that move was played, White …
answered Feb 6 '16 by Glorfindel
6
votes
The name 'gambit' was coined in the 16th century already by Ruy López. He derived it from the old Italian expression dare il gambetto (literally: 'to give the leg'). It means 'to trip (someone) …
answered Oct 11 '15 by Glorfindel
3
votes
Two ideas that spring to my mind: Harass the bishop, and threaten to trap it / exchange it for a knight, with moves like h3, g4 and Nh4. Attack the squares/pawns the bishop has left behind, with mov …
answered Nov 20 '16 by Glorfindel
8
votes
Black's main threat after 3... c6 is d5; it looks like Qe2 is an attempt to prevent that, by indirectly attacking pawn e5, even with check. However, I'm not so sure that it works as intended, because …
answered Aug 19 '16 by Glorfindel
17
votes
- not as a real opening, but as some sort of a student's joke, something silly that might be played at the end of a long blitz-and-boozing session. Wasn't this the 'Irish Gambit', the one with the …
answered Dec 9 '18 by Glorfindel
9
votes
It's not necessary; the solid Petrov's Defence continues with the counterattack 2... Nf6. There's also a less stable option in 2... f5, the Latvian Gambit but it rarely sees play at the top level. Ot …
answered Sep 21 '18 by Glorfindel
9
votes
The move a3 serves basically two functions: White can develop the bishop to c4, and keep it aimed on d5, even if Black attacks it with b5, or, as Giri did, with Be6. In the lines where Black plays …
answered Jan 15 '17 by Glorfindel
5
votes
There are a lot of openings where Black fianchettos his king's bishop, and it ends up on g7. Versus 1. d4 you have the King's Indian Defense and the Grünfeld Defense; if White opens 1. e4 you can resp …
answered Jul 25 '17 by Glorfindel
5
votes
This really comes down to what you're comfortable with. Both the Benoni and the QGD are good options, precisely because of the reason you mention: a3 isn't really useful for White in those openings, s …
answered Jan 22 '18 by Glorfindel
12
votes
Against a white d4-e5 pawn formation, Black wants to play c5 (see e.g. the French opening). In the Caro-Kann, that will cost two moves (c7-c6-c5), while in the Scandinavian, it's only one move since …
answered May 14 by Glorfindel
7
votes
A very fast checkmate (6 moves) is described here: 1. P-7f P-8d 2. P-5f P-5d 3. R-5h S-4b 4. P-5e Px5e 5. Bx5e P-8e 6. Bx7c+ mate apologies in advance for everyone who feels insulted because of t …
answered May 31 '16 by Glorfindel
9
votes
which variation you play. The main problem with changing who moves first (or alternating it) is that many diagrams which have been printed (especially in opening books) would be invalidated, or at least …
answered May 26 by Glorfindel
7
votes
Generally, the simul-giver needs to keep the games as different from each other as possible. That means the opening themselves are less important, as long as they are different openings. The simul … ropes of blind simuls, he varied his games right from the start, maybe opening two with 1.e4, two with 1.d4, one with 1.b3, and so on. To his suprise, all of his opponents played 1...b6. On the second …
answered Oct 15 '17 by Glorfindel
4
votes
It is basically a trade-off: are you so afraid of the Slav that you're willing to play a slightly inferior Exchange line? The main line of the QGD Exchange is: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 …
answered Jul 16 '15 by Glorfindel
8
votes
1. c3 (and 1. d3 and 1. e3, which can lead to reversed Pircs, French defense or QGD) aren't bad in that they give White a worse position. So those moves might have some merit as a surprise weapon (if …
answered Apr 29 by Glorfindel
9
votes
The game will get the characteristics of the Philidor Defense rather than the Italian Game. Wikipedia calls it the Semi-Italian Opening. I. A. Horowitz called the defence "solid", also writing …
answered May 18 by Glorfindel
8
votes
White should trade bishops and use the unprotected knight to gain some extra tempo and gain a massive lead in development, e.g. [FEN ""] 1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bh6 3. Bxh6 Nxh6 4. Qd2 Ng8 5. Nc3 4... Ng4 …
answered May 14 by Glorfindel
3
votes
Never do it in front of your castled king (or on the wing where you want to castle), if the opponent hasn't castled yet or castled on the other wing. Doing so weakens your king's fortress and is an o …
answered Jan 24 '18 by Glorfindel
5
votes
First, you need to see that in the original position, Black has already a close to winning advantage. Especially the pin on f3 is nasty; it's hard for White to defend the knight now that the bishop is …
answered Aug 19 '17 by Glorfindel