Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 7297

Tactics are the concrete maneuvers (e.g. forking two pieces with a knight, pinning a piece to the opponent's king, or unleashing a discovered check) that chess players use and combine in order to achieve their overall goals in a game. They are the building blocks which underlie successful strategies.

2
votes
Substitution would be another. With a trade/capture, you can set up another tactical motive like a skewer or a fork. In the position below (taken from the ChessTactics link above), Black wins an exch …
answered Apr 27 '16 by Glorfindel
4
votes
White threatens mate on g7, but and the remaining endgame is easily won for Black.
answered Nov 26 '15 by Glorfindel
5
votes
@Bad_Bishop is almost correct, and this illustrates a general pattern in chess tactics: if a sequence of moves almost works, try changing the move order: …
answered Nov 29 '15 by Glorfindel
16
votes
[FEN "R5k1/5ppp/8/2r5/1b6/8/5PPP/6K1 b - - 0 1"] 1... Rc8 2. Rxc8+ Bf8 This is an example of what Tim Krabbé calls an 'unguarded guard' - a linepiece checks, and a piece interposes on an unguarded …
answered Aug 2 by Glorfindel
4
votes
It is interesting to see that you don't mention tactics in your post, while you did tag your question with it. Because, at the level you're playing, 99% of the games are decided by tactics. Practice more tactics, and you will advance quickly, especially if you know the basics of defense/offense. …
answered Jun 11 '16 by Glorfindel
1
vote
Well, since an exchange between A and B is in the sole benefit of player C, your primary objective should be: avoid exchanges. How do you avoid exchanges in a normal chess game? Play an opening with a …
answered Aug 2 '16 by Glorfindel
0
votes
You're right, Black's dominance on the dark squares makes sure White cannot make any progress, and he only needs to sacrifice his rook for two pawns to ensure the draw. If he occupies the key squares …
answered May 15 by Glorfindel
6
votes
Two basic ideas: Put a knight on f5; Black will have a hard time chasing it away with g6 without losing material. Storm with your g-pawn to g5. Especially with the black knight still on f6, Black ca …
answered Dec 30 '16 by Glorfindel
12
votes
The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. R …
answered Dec 19 '16 by Glorfindel
2
votes
Here is a (rather simple) example of a position where stalemate is forced, no matter what either player does: [FEN "8/p1p3pp/5ppk/6q1/5PPK/6P1/P1P3PP/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. fxg5+ fxg5+ 2. Kh3 a6 3. a3 a5 …
answered Apr 12 by Glorfindel
5
votes
pawn structure. (Immediate tactics on c7 look promising but aren't.) Black is better off trying to hold on to the queen, but he'll have trouble protecting his king from the dangerous bishop-knight …
answered Aug 19 '17 by Glorfindel