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Questions related to learning how to play chess and improving your chess skills. This can also be used for questions concerning "learning" chess engines.

6
votes
http://www.pgnmentor.com/files.html Allows you to download by player, by opening or by event where the game was played.
answered Nov 24 '14 by Cleveland
5
votes
Tony has it right in his comment. The only way that you're going to proceed beyond beginner level is to start playing regularly in person against people stronger than you. If you play with the same gr …
answered Oct 2 '14 by Cleveland
37
votes
It depends what you mean by 'professional'. If you want to support yourself solely by playing tournaments, the answer is definitely no. At the very least that would require being in the top 50 in the …
answered Nov 30 '14 by Cleveland
5
votes
This is difficult to answer. They are generally stronger in some or all of the following areas: Tactics Endgames Planning Recognition of positional features Openings However, they may be weaker …
answered Sep 20 '15 by Cleveland
20
votes
The answer from SmallChess is good. There's also an illustrative tweet from Garry Kasparov on the subject: For beginning chess players, studying a Carlsen game is like wanting to be an electrical …
answered Dec 27 '18 by Cleveland
2
votes
Bughouse really doesn't. What can help you is shogi. Shogi is similar to chess but with complications that start almost immediately and become much more crazy than in chess. The reports that I have ha …
answered Sep 28 '14 by Cleveland
2
votes
I would switch the cause and effect. Strong players have many games memorized because chess memory improves with strength, not because the memorization made them strong. I am not saying that memorizin …
answered Oct 22 '14 by Cleveland