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Results tagged with Search options user 17

Questions relating to the rules of chess

3
votes
The two player's scoresheets are the record of the game, and they should "match." They prove how the game went, and players' signing them show that they agree on the end result and outcome. If for so …
answered Sep 6 '16 by Tom Au
3
votes
Your "golden rules" are "truisms," good guidelines that TEND to be true in most situations most of the time. But there are exceptions to these rules in most situations. A game between two world …
answered Feb 19 '13 by Tom Au
1
vote
A pawn capturing en passant (the d pawn in this case), basically interrupts the passage of the adjacent (c) pawn on his third rank (c6 for you), on the way from c7 to c5. This privilege can be exercis …
answered Jul 7 '13 by Tom Au
3
votes
First of all, neither a rook nor a knight can make the single diagonal "en passant" move. Of course, kings, queens, and bishops can, so the question is why they do not. A pawn moving two squares repr …
answered Sep 8 '16 by Tom Au
1
vote
When you want to resign, just resign. In informal play, some people just knock down their king. "I resign" is a move. And recorded as such on the scoresheets of tournaments. That is to say that you d …
answered Jan 7 '14 by Tom Au
2
votes
NO. You move the pawn to the eighth rank, promote it to a piece, and then your turn ends. What confuses some people is that the "promotion" is a second action, which feels like a second turn. So they …
answered Jul 10 '16 by Tom Au
2
votes
A pawn that is captured "en passant," starts on the second rank and ends on the fourth rank, having gotten there via the third rank. The "en passant" rule allows the opponent to stop the pawn on the …
answered Jun 9 '12 by Tom Au
17
votes
If a player has a theoretical win, that person has a move limit (50 moves) with "no fundamental alteration of the position." That means no captures of pawns or pieces, and no pawn moves. The count is …
answered May 1 '12 by Tom Au
0
votes
If you keep a written record of games, the ending position can be reconstructed. Then the referee can reason from the board position whether a resignation or a draw is the more equitable result from t …
answered Sep 5 '17 by Tom Au
8
votes
A piece can give check even when it is pinned. This is the main "exception" to the rule that a pinned piece cannot move. The reason is, your pinned piece giving check "takes" the opposing king first. …
answered May 4 '13 by Tom Au
27
votes
If you drive an enemy king into a corner, you still need to control four different squares to checkmate him. Your king can control two of those squares (but cannot approach the enemy king), your knigh …
answered Aug 21 '12 by Tom Au
10
votes
You wouldn't want to place the rook in front of the queen at b4. Because it can be captured by the pawn on a5. Even if you do want to, you can't move the rook in front of the queen (or anywhere else) …
answered Sep 2 '12 by Tom Au
20
votes
The rules are that the king can't castle into check, through check, or when in check. This applies to the king's square, plus the two squares to the right or left. Castling is permitted when the …
answered May 2 '12 by Tom Au
3
votes
There is no time limit (except for the over all limit) on any one move. If you have two hours to make X moves, you can take one hour and fifty nine minutes to make one move, and use the last minute to …
answered Aug 3 '12 by Tom Au