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Questions relating to the first few moves in a game

0
votes
Most people have their "favorite" openings. That's only natural, because people need to learn fewer openings. One important thing to do is avoid your "unfavorite" openings. For instance, if you disli …
answered Dec 20 '15 by Tom Au
3
votes
3answers
In one game between world class players, (Alekhine and Rubinstein), the game began 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 ... When Rubenstein played 3... a6?, Alekhine grabbed the opportunity to reply 4. c5! bec …
asked Apr 28 '13 by Tom Au
5
votes
Arguably, the "original" hyper Modern opening was the Reti opening. named after Richard Reti who introduced, or at least popularized it. It was White's opening, and began Nf3. If Black responded d5 …
answered Jul 18 '14 by Tom Au
3
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In the example given, the opening move was Nf3. A number of the main lines were given, eight more moves for Black, seven more moves for White. Then the percentages of games won by White (in …
answered Feb 19 '13 by Tom Au
7
votes
, I'd move a knight to c3 or f3 (c6 or f6 if Black), then a bishop or two. Castle as soon as possible, before undertaking activities on the wings. That eliminated a lot of bad opening moves like b3, g3, and worse, a4 and h4. …
answered May 3 '12 by Tom Au
1
vote
After 3. c4, perhaps the simplest for Black is to play 3. ... Be6 to protect both the QP and the bishop. His development is a bit constricted, but so is White's.
answered May 20 '14 by Tom Au
0
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In the example you cited, it was not a "strange" opening but an inferior opening. The "kid" (beginner, actually), started with a "Pirc" defense (fortify the dark squares), and changed his mind by … he's done, that is, he's gotten an inferior French defense. You might play 4. e4xd5, Nxd5; 5.Nxd5 Qxd5 6. c4 Q moves, and Nf3 to get a superior opening. His other opening moves may follow the same (bad) principles, and if they do, you should learn to take advantage of them. …
answered Dec 20 '15 by Tom Au
6
votes
It helps to know the book moves and the main variations of the openings that you play. Realize that if your opponent deviates from them early in the game, he's probably making an inferior move. (Unles …
answered Jul 19 '12 by Tom Au
5
votes
4answers
We know that 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f6 is a disaster for Black (Damiano Opening). But White has an extra move. Can he therefore play 1. e4 e5 2. f3 ? If Black replies 2... Nf6, White has 3. Ne2 (followed … eventually by Ng3). That seems to stave off the immediate problem of the Damiano Opening. So does the extra move give White enough leeway to play like this? …
asked Feb 27 '13 by Tom Au
6
votes
An opening is named after successful professional USE by a world class player, in world class events. Many "openings" are played by amateurs, either accidentally or on purpose, that don't get names … . But if a line is played in high level tournaments by X, and X wins a large percentage of his games, people come to recognize it as X's opening, and name it after him or her. …
answered Feb 19 '13 by Tom Au
0
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A "defense" is a subset of an "opening." It is a system for Black against standard opening moves such as d4 or e4. Other "openings" are named from White's point of view, such as Ruy Lopez (e4) or the Colle System (d4). …
answered Feb 15 '15 by Tom Au
4
votes
Nc6, threatening Na5 to harass the B. With Nc6, you have two knights out, white has none. In the opening, the rule for development is "knights before bishops," not to mention queens. My second choice …
answered May 25 '13 by Tom Au
7
votes
1answer
Former world champion JR Capablanca was not a particularly good opening player. Yet he was the "champ" because once he survived the opening, he played better middle and endgames than others. And this … , Botvinnik, and Keres, but even second-rank Russian players. A major reason was that they played varied and complicated openings, and got the "jump" on Capablanca in this part of the game. Why didn't non-Russian players do more to take Capablanca out of his familiar opening lines? …
asked Jul 14 '16 by Tom Au
1
vote
Against e4, I like c5 (Sicilian Defense). Against d4, I like f5, (Dutch Defense), as suggested by another answerer. These openings aren't totally offensive, because White has the offense. But they ar …
answered Dec 7 '14 by Tom Au
0
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If White plays his B to g5, the best place for Black's black squared bishop is e7, according to Capablanca (Chess Fundamentals), breaking the pin on the Knight. This move may reveal White's B as being …
answered Jul 14 '14 by Tom Au

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