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Results tagged with Search options user 17

Questions related to learning how to play chess and improving your chess skills. This can also be used for questions concerning "learning" chess engines.

2
votes
Two important things: 1) "I draw when I'm winning." That happens a lot to B (and lower) players. An A player, almost by definition, will win once he has the advantage. Get a teacher to teach you how …
answered Dec 20 '15 by Tom Au
5
votes
If you want to get better at combinations, play tactical moves, such as pinning pieces with a bishop, moving rooks to open files, launching double attacks with a queen and a second piece, etc. In one …
answered Aug 3 '12 by Tom Au
11
votes
If you remain unbiased, playing against yourself will force you to try to find the best (or at least good) moves for both sides. It is actually a stiff mental exercise. But it gets you thinking, if …
answered Feb 2 '13 by Tom Au
0
votes
You have reached a certain level, and determined that you can hold your own against other players, computer and human, until you reach the endgame. Then the endgame is the weakest part of the game, t …
answered Jul 10 '16 by Tom Au
2
votes
I play Go (the Japanese board game), which some players I know study to help them improve their chess. Go has a large variety of tactical motifs, including teaching players how to maintain sente (the …
answered Aug 3 '12 by Tom Au
0
votes
You want to trade pieces after you've maximized the value of your own. (You have a space advantage, so Black's "maximum" is less than yours.) Specifically, you want to concentrate your queen and rook …
answered Jul 4 '15 by Tom Au
2
votes
I'd say, play the variations that best suit your temperament. 3. e5 is a tough, fighting variation that will likely lead to victory for one side or the other. On the other hand, the exchange variation …
answered Jul 21 '12 by Tom Au
3
votes
In economics, the idea is to try to equate "marginal utilities," in this case, between playing and studying. You now seem to feel you are playing too much. So stop playing and start studying. Eventua …
answered Aug 24 '12 by Tom Au
0
votes
It was a temporary sacrifice. It enabled the knight on b5 to run amok through Black territory, and get both bishops for the two knights. Black ended up with an isolated e pawn, and vastly inferior mob …
answered Oct 31 '17 by Tom Au
11
votes
Capablanca didn't like to "study chess or openings" means that he didn't like to study formal chess (as it was understood in his time). On the other hand, he studied more, and had a better grasp of c …
answered May 11 '12 by Tom Au
3
votes
Try to understand the key idea behind the opening, and try to relate each of the main moves to it. If you can't do this, you don't understand the opening. First test the new opening by playing it aga …
answered Jul 30 '16 by Tom Au
8
votes
I knew a guy from high school, whom I would characterize as a "genius," who is (now in his 50s), barely a master, that is, about 2200. He was a "teen prodigy" that won our league in our city in those …
answered May 14 '15 by Tom Au
3
votes
In [Title "your example"] [fen "4r2k/Bb1n2pp/2q1r3/1R1Qpp2/2P5/5P2/P4KPP/4RB2 w - - 0 1"] 1. Rxb7 Qxb7 2. Qxb7 when R x b7, your Queen on d5 is guarding the rook, even though it doesn't look like …
answered Feb 2 '13 by Tom Au
2
votes
I knew a guy from high school who was an 1800 player at the age of 15 (not 25). He was the best player in my high school chess league, and the best chess player that I got to know on a day to day basi …
answered Oct 2 '18 by Tom Au
7
votes
It's a bit old, but I cut my teeth on "Chess Fundamentals" by former world champion JR Capablanca. Moreover, it's one of the few books in the public domain, so you can access it online.
answered Feb 10 '13 by Tom Au

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