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The endgame is the part of the game when there are only a few pieces left on the board. Usually play revolves around one or both players trying to promote a pawn. Alternatives are the opening and middlegame tags.

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What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move. Assuming that the two kings and rook were all in …
answered Oct 21 '15 by Tom Au
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The importance of pawns is that 1) they can become queens by marching down to the opponent's eighth rank and 2) the endgame is the time for them to do so. So the value of the pawns increases the more … pieces are traded off, and the closer to the endgame you get to. The fewer the remaining pieces, the greater the value of an individual pawn in percentage terms. In the middle game, other factors …
answered Mar 12 '13 by Tom Au
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I think of the endgame as a "countdown." That is, at the beginning, you need "many" moves to win (or resolve the game). In the endgame, you need only a few moves for resolution. Basically, you want … to teach your student to "resolve" his games in the clearest, simplest way. That's what endgames are for. The ones to begin with might be the ones where he could have "simplified" quickly into a won endgame and failed to do so, and had to win the "hard" way. …
answered Jun 26 '17 by Tom Au
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Games that lead to unbalanced endgames are usually unbalanced early in the game. For instance, in the "exchange" variation of the Ruy Lopez (an early Bxc6), Black gets a bishop pair at the expense o …
answered Dec 20 '15 by Tom Au
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This resembles another position referred to as the "Iron Duke." Based on my knowledge of the other position, I'd say that Black can draw. The reason is that all the potential entry points (on the fou …
answered Nov 3 '12 by Tom Au
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2answers
8/8/8/5kp1/p7/P4K2/1P6/8 b - - 0 1 White just played Kf3, thereby gaining the opposition. If there were no queenside pawns, what is on the kingside would be a "book" draw. That's because the White …
asked Mar 23 '16 by Tom Au
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Three (bad) things happened: You weakened your kingside by playing g4. Black castled O-O-O, to take advantage of number 1, while protecting his king behind the phalanx of (doubled) pawns. The worst …
answered Apr 9 '14 by Tom Au
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In your diagram, White wins if the Black king is on e8, with White to move. Then the winning move is e7, and the king has to move "out of the way" to d7, you play Kf7, and the pawn queens. But if it …
answered May 14 '15 by Tom Au
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It's clear that Black has the following advantages: 1) His king is better centralized. 2) He has two connected passed pawns. 3) White has no passed pawns because one Black pawn holds up two White o …
answered Nov 3 '12 by Tom Au
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By Capablanca's own admission, one of the games that advanced his understanding of the endgame (and probably that of others) was his game against Richard Teichmann in 1913: [FEN ""] [Event "Berlin …
answered Aug 17 '12 by Tom Au
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Theoretically yes, as a practical matter (for humans), no. What is known is that a pawnless position cannot be won (barring unusual positional circumstances) if one side has an advantage of a bishop …
answered Mar 14 '15 by Tom Au
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If the knight is close to the king, it is hard to win with a rook. That's because the knight will fend off the enemy pieces that try to approach the king. Most winning positions feature the knight and …
answered Jun 16 '12 by Tom Au
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Because not everyone who is "interested" in chess is trying to optimize their chances of getting better. A number of people treat chess games as if they were "stories." They start reading a game/sto …
answered Nov 5 '17 by Tom Au
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Black's next four moves will be Nxg3, (unless White advances the g pawn, in which case Black plays f5xg4), Ne4, Ng5, and Nxe6, unless White moves his N to protect it, in which case Black moves Ke7. W …
answered Mar 6 '17 by Tom Au
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Black can't save the endgame if White plays well. As Capablanca wrote in "Chess Fundamentals," a rook on the seventh rank is worth a pawn. Given that actual pawns are even, consider White a pawn …
answered Aug 6 '16 by Tom Au

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