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Tactics are the concrete maneuvers (e.g. forking two pieces with a knight, pinning a piece to the opponent's king, or unleashing a discovered check) that chess players use and combine in order to achieve their overall goals in a game. They are the building blocks which underlie successful strategies.

6
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The pawn on g7 performs two vital functions: It protects the pawn on f6 from capture by the White knight. It indirectly bars the way to g8 to the White rook on g3. If it captures the queen on h6 ( …
answered Jul 17 '16 by Tom Au
0
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I believe that the OP's observation is correct. A computer is worst at evaluating "intangible" advantages, and best at calculating "lines." So to the extent possible, a human player should aim for the …
answered Oct 18 '12 by Tom Au
3
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In [Title "your example"] [fen "4r2k/Bb1n2pp/2q1r3/1R1Qpp2/2P5/5P2/P4KPP/4RB2 w - - 0 1"] 1. Rxb7 Qxb7 2. Qxb7 when R x b7, your Queen on d5 is guarding the rook, even though it doesn't look like …
answered Feb 2 '13 by Tom Au
0
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A king can only capture unprotected pieces. In this case, the Black queen is protected by the black-squared bishop. If a king moves into a square where an enemy piece (the bishop) can recapture him, …
answered Dec 20 '15 by Tom Au
6
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Correspondence chess will do more to improve the quality of your game. That is, your moves will be a lot more thoughtful and deliberate, and so will your opponent's. When you lose, it will probably be …
answered Oct 31 '17 by Tom Au
5
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It's a bit early to say that the game will be a draw when only one pair of pieces has been exchanged (the dark squared bishops). What IS true is that both sides "dodged a bullet," the complications t …
answered Apr 6 '13 by Tom Au
1
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All of your alleged disadvantages are offset by compensating advantages: 1) "The diagonal it controls is often blocked by the knight in its natural square." Yes, but when the knight moves it can "dis …
answered Nov 2 '13 by Tom Au
3
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In order to learn tactics, you want to get into tactical situations. These can occur in the opening, middle, or end game. But if you play tactical openings, you get a head start on these situations (and guarantee that you'll get some). …
answered Feb 2 '13 by Tom Au
0
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You're fine, because your queen on h6 attacks the pawn on c6, as well as a number of points on the kingside, and Black can't defend them all. His best is probably 21... Be6 (shields the pawn). Then yo …
answered Sep 5 '17 by Tom Au
2
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In economics, it's called the "law of diminishing returns." You study tactics for a while, and then reach a point where you seem to make little progress. Then you "switched gears" and studied … strategy, and that helped your game a lot because it was what you were weak in. So keep studying strategy until you "hit a wall," at which point tactics may be the scarce factor of production. Or it may be something else, such as endgames. The quickest way to improve is to work on the thing you are weakest at. …
answered Jul 11 '16 by Tom Au
0
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The most "undrawable" openings (against you) are the ones that you play the best. If you are getting too many draws from your openings, you do not know them well enough to punish your opponents for th …
answered Jul 12 '16 by Tom Au
0
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A knight and bishop together are worth SEVEN points, not six, at least in early part of the game because of the synergies. (Or, if you will three and half for the minor pieces). Also, to make this se …
answered Jan 28 '13 by Tom Au
1
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Black can't save the endgame if White plays well. As Capablanca wrote in "Chess Fundamentals," a rook on the seventh rank is worth a pawn. Given that actual pawns are even, consider White a pawn ahea …
answered Aug 6 '16 by Tom Au
2
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To beat such a beginner, I would use "tricky" openings such as the Sicilian defense (c5 vs. e4) or Dutch Defense (f5 vs. d4) as Black. And Reti Opening nf3 or English Opening (c4), as White. Your beg …
answered Jul 25 '14 by Tom Au
2
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Chinese chess appears to be more difficult, or at least more subtle, because the powers of the pieces are generally less than in western chess. Only the Chinese chariots are the equivalent of the wes …
answered Apr 4 '14 by Tom Au

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