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Questions tagged [selfmate]

A selfmate is a type of chess problem in which one side, usually White, forces the other side to checkmate them. The other side plays to avoid the checkmate.

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18 votes
6 answers
4k views

Can one side force a loss in regular chess?

Chess is unsolved, so there is no known optimal strategy for one side to force a win or a draw. However, is there an optimal strategy to lose? Consider a variant where checkmate results in a loss, ...
Victor's user avatar
  • 297
21 votes
5 answers
7k views

A position with the only legal move resulting in checkmate

Theoretically, is it possible that for some position, the only legal move for a side leads to a checkmate (that is, the opposite king gets checkmated)? If so, has this ever occurred in a real game?
HPP_00's user avatar
  • 411
4 votes
2 answers
747 views

The quickest selfmate in 1

How quickly can a legal game reach a position where one side must give checkmate? This is in effect Evergalo's reading (see his (now deleted) answer) of Rewan Demontay's Question 33154; that question ...
Noam D. Elkies's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
246 views

Move forcing opponent to checkmate in response

I was wondering if there was a move so bad in chess that if you played it the only move your opponent could do was checkmate you back, through blocking your piece or through moving the king. It would ...
Esther Sai's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
1k views

Position where neither player can force a win and neither player can force a draw

One sometimes sees the claim that in every chess position, either White has a forced win, or Black has a forced win, or both players can force a draw. While this claim is "morally" correct, ...
Timothy Chow's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
486 views

Theoretically, is the analysis of the moves more complex if the objective is to be the first to be checkmated?

I have seen variations of other board games or strategy games where the aim is to actually 'lose' the game by forcing your opponents to make moves. Applying this concept to the rules of chess, would ...
Michael Lai's user avatar