5

I'm thinking about playing the Maroczy Bind with White in the Symmetrical English (1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 - notice that I start with 1. Nf3).

But I don't know exactly in what cases I should play it.

So I would like to know if these four sentences are true or not:

  1. The Maroczy Bind is good for White if White places his King's Bishop on e2.
  2. The Maroczy Bind is not good for White if White fianchettoes his King's Bishop on g2.
  3. The Maroczy Bind is not good for White if Black places his King's Bishop on e7.
  4. The Maroczy Bind is good for White if Black fianchettoes his King's Bishop on g7.
5

I have only ever played the Maroczy Bind against the sicilian and in the light of this limited knowledge all your propositions make some sense.

1./2. Be2 is where you normally place your bishop in the sicilian binds and it makes sense to refrain from e4 (at least for a time) if you fianchettoed the bishop. I have also read that after the fianchetto the square e4 is kept free for some possible piece maneuvers (Only Ne4 after d6 and e6 have been played comes to my mind).

3./4. The Maroczy is the main line against the acc. dragon, but not against the Paulsen/Kan. So one could deduce that the black bishop is better off on e7. But it is very playable against both and there is also the matter of move orders and the strength of alternative lines, so this probably doesn't make much of a difference.

In the end this is very much a question of concrete lines. There probably isn't an easy recipe for when to whip out the Maroczy Bind.

0

You need to buy a book on the English opening covering these structures. Chess Explained: The English Opening by Zenon Franco (ISBN: 9781904600596) is a decent start.

  • How much of that book covers the Maroczy Bind? – user800 Nov 15 '18 at 15:42

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