6

I am improving my chess. What is the best move here and why? (black moves)

Thanks in advance:)

rnb2rk1/pp2qpp1/3p1b1p/2pBp2Q/4P2P/3P1N2/PPP2PP1/2KR3R b - h3 0 1
  • Trap the queen, with with ..b3 move. Also try to avoid check:J – pbu Jul 27 '15 at 0:22
  • 2
    @pbu, I suppose you mean ..g6. However, that would be a terrible move: Qxg6+, as the f-pawn is pinned by the bishop. – Maxwell86 Jul 27 '15 at 6:45
  • Yes Maxwell86. :) Break the pin. Its seems fatal. – pbu Jul 27 '15 at 19:02
3

I think an answer to this question should stress the fact that white has a very dangerous and ready made attack in this position. If black does nothing, g4-g5 will rip his kingside apart, extra piece notwithstanding.

Be6 is a good move because it exchanges one attacking piece and regains control of an important square, g6. For example after 1…Be6 2.g4 Bxd5 3.exd5 Qd7 4.g5 g6 5.Qxh6 Bg7, black has managed to defend and trap the queen.

Edit: I want to add that this is one of the positions where a computer will not show you what it's all about. An engine will calculate that g4-g5 doesn't work so it might not even show the idea. With black it might not defend against it directly, because it sees that due to some random tactical details (king on c1 instead of b1, Rh3 impossible, etc.) it can defend against g4-g5 even a move later.

But for a human player g4-g5 is the whole point of the position. This is the problem you have to solve as black, if you do, you will win. This is the plan you have to make work as white, otherwise you might as well resign.

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  • Hi. I guess it's an error in 4.g5 g6 because pawn is g4. – David Trujillo Jul 27 '15 at 22:11
  • What's the continuation to 1... Be6 2. g4 Bxd5 3. g5 Black's dark squared bishop is trapped, light squared bishop is still attacked by the pawn, and gxh6 is on the cards as well. I don't see it. – NoseKnowsAll Jul 29 '15 at 15:52
  • I thought just 3…Be6 again. After 4.gxf6 Qxf6 the g-file is open but there are Qf4+ ideas and the Nf3 is attacked, so I think black should be in time to come up with a defensive setup. – BlindKungFuMaster Jul 30 '15 at 7:23
2

Black is up a piece, so I would just play ...Be6 to force a bishop trade, which is generally a good idea when you're up material (you'd rather be up 1 piece to 0 than 6 pieces to 5).

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  • 2
    Why the downvote? – Tony Ennis Jul 26 '15 at 23:35
  • Because White has a dangerous Kingside attack which dfan has ignored. – magd Jul 29 '15 at 14:03
  • White has jack after ...Be6. – Tony Ennis Jul 30 '15 at 3:27
  • Perhaps, but this answer doesn't explain why. – magd Jul 30 '15 at 11:39
  • 1
    @TonyEnnis I cheerfully accept the criticism that the attack (and why it is not serious) should have been at least mentioned. – dfan Jul 30 '15 at 13:04
0

Black has saddled himself with a ghastly pawn chain weakness - the hole on d5. Since the White Bishop that's sitting there is powerful, and its Black counterpart is undeveloped, 1... Be6 seems to be a good move. I'd be intend on capturing it the next move. I don't think White wants to capture the Black Bishop with 2. Bxe6 since this will allow Black to defend d5 with 2... fxe6.

Once White's Bishop is gone, g5 and h5 start looking entertaining for Black as White has no defenders on that side of the board.

Black needs to connect his rooks (before pushing h5 and g5) and be ready for White to hammer on that backward d pawn with his rooks.

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  • black is a piece up, white cannot hope for d pawn and should make stronger attack like b4-b5 push and taking advantage of black's king position and not well developed pieces. Otherwise by slowly putting pressure on d pawn, black will exchange pieces and simply wins a piece up game. – Saeed Amiri Jul 27 '15 at 0:36
  • 1
    P.S: b4-b5 is actually g4-g5 – Saeed Amiri Jul 27 '15 at 13:49

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