4

Any good references (books/videos/tutorials) for this variation?

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1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nf6 5.Nxf6+ gxf6

Thanks!

  • Yes there are, but I advise you not to play it. The plan with g3 + Bg2 offers White an advantage, if memory serves... – AlwaysLearningNewStuff May 17 '15 at 8:47
  • I actually prefer this variation to the "3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3" and "3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7" variations. With the former, I am afraid to castle kingside because I could not stop White's kingside pawn storm and when castling queenside, I couldn't think of good plans for Black to play actively. With the latter, the game can be opened by white quickly. I am afraid of open games, I only like closed or semi-closed games, so the Bronstein-Larsen variation seems to be a semi-closed one. – user1764381 May 18 '15 at 0:27
  • 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 is quite solid, I would go that way. It offers easy equality, as far as I remember. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff May 18 '15 at 0:29
2

If you read Danish there's Bent Larsen's Solide åbninger (Solid openings) from 1980.

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It is a repertoire book for beginners (white and black) and suggests the line you inquire about as the defense against 1. e4.

  • Thanks Dag Oskar Madsen, but unfortunately I don't read Danish. – user1764381 May 18 '15 at 0:35

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