6

I first thought that starting with 1. Nf3 would avoid the QID. But after thinking about it, this is only true if White plays 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3

The move 3. Nc3 seems really cool since this would probably get out of book most people who play the Nimzo/QID complex (at least at the club level).

Though 3. g3 is also very interesting. But after 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Black has 3... b6

And then we have a position that is very close to a QID, but there is one difference: White didn't play d4 yet.

Does this make a real important difference? Or is this position also considered as a QID? Will White need to play d4 later anyway, and thus transposing to a normal QID?

After 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 b6 4. Bg2 Bb7 5. O-O what would you recommend me to play?

After 5...Be7 there are three possible moves:

  • 6.Nc3
  • 6.d4
  • 6.b3

What are all the differences between these three moves?

And finally, what do you think about Wojo's 6. Nc3 O-O 7. Re1 ?

  • Are you willing to play King's Indian Attack? There might be a possibility to exploit Black's move order to launch faster mating attack... – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Jul 26 '14 at 20:10
5

Does this make a real important difference? Or is this position also considered as a QID?

This is definitely not QID, as White hasn't played d4 yet. This is a major difference, that is good for White. Black needs to prevent e4 in the QID and he succeeds in it, but here White has an extra "warrior" for fight for the e4, the d-pawn. If White could get e4 then Black position could become difficult.

Will White need to play d4 later anyway, and thus transposing to a normal QID?

No, You have a choice: you can "forgive" him for being too hasty ( play d4 and enter standard QID ) or you can try and punish him ( by fighting for e4 ).

After 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 b6 4. Bg2 Bb7 5. O-O what would you recommend me to play?

I would follow the line Kramnik gave in book Khalifman-Opening for White According to Kramnik 1.Nf3 ( 2nd book, 2001 ) and go for Nc3 so I could fight for e4.

What are all the differences between these three moves?

With d4 you go for the QID ( not bad ), with b3 you go for Reti-like-position and with Nc3 you try to refute Black's play.

And finally, what do you think about Wojo's 6. Nc3 O-O 7. Re1 ?

This is the plan I would choose in the game ( Kramnik suggested it as well! ). It tries to refute Black's opening play by claiming e4 -> it is the strongest plan in my opinion.

  • I think you are a little too optimistic about White's chance after 6. Nc3 O-O 7. Re1. Sure, it is tempting to go for e4 first and d4 after, but that is just an opening choice among others. Most grandmasters would call it an option to exploit the move order, but not an "attempt at refutation"... – Evargalo Nov 2 '17 at 7:10
2

I will take a shot at it with my limited knowledge. I think it seems to me like a Reti transformed into a standard English opening line with 3. g3 b6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.0-0. Your assumption is right when you say it's not a QID since white didn't play d4. Will white play d4 later anyway? It's possible, although for instance after 5.0-0 Be7, if I were white, I might not play that as black control's the e4 square. And it's a central theme in QID positions, I believe. as for 6.b3 black can equalize easily and play 6... 0-0 7.Bb2 c5 or d5 and have some control in the centre.

Wojo's 6. Nc3 0-0 7. Re1,black can reply with d5 and equalize quite easily.

I think another option of white on move 6 can be 6.d3.

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