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I have one question in my mind that while playing chess game with real person... . I also want to become winner.not only me but all starters. . 1. What do you feel. 2. How do you think. 3. How can you beat your opponent. 4.how do you make strategy. . Thanks in advance.....

closed as too broad by Lily Chung, Dag Oskar Madsen, Andrew May 29 '14 at 18:17

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    At the moment, covering all 4 points in your question is nearly impossible. It is just too brad to fit in a single post. That is mostly the reason why others downvoted, and why your question might be closed. Please rephrase the question so it can address a "smaller" topic or delete it and ask all of those 4 points as separate questions. This is just my advice. Best regards. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff May 29 '14 at 17:25
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    @AlwaysLearningNewStuff Even these questions separately are too broad to be answered. "3. How can you beat your opponent?" Unless you want an answer like "Play good moves" or "Checkmate" it is too broad – Alan May 29 '14 at 20:36
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    @Alan: Indeed, I have missed that... Well, I hope OP understood what we have meant to say... Good catch, you have a "sharp eye". Best regards. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff May 29 '14 at 20:40
  • the question may be broad. the answer doesn't have to be. there are lot of moderators down voting questions unnecessarily. don't understand why this is put on hold when there are already 2 answers. – guru May 30 '14 at 11:52
  • apart from the third question, the rest are not so broad. you just have to say how you feel - calm, tense, etc. and what are your thought processes. – guru May 30 '14 at 11:54
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The truth is on the board. Focus your efforts on discovering the truth about the position and what the position needs. Understand each position as best you can, then play the move that makes your position better.

Don't just look for the answer inside yourself, but solicit outside knowledge. Ask others, including your opponent after a game; chess players love to brag about how much they understand about the position, even when they lose. There are also some good books that are very helpful in learning how to break down a position.

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  1. Feelings are not really relevant, are they? Happy to be playing I guess.

  2. What is my opponent planning? Is there a real threat? What are my options? Do I have any opportunities?

  3. Do not be intimidated by a strong opponent, you can still give them a good game. Likewise, never underestimate a weak opponent, even if they're chasing material at the expense of position with unguarded pieces everywhere, you could still lose.

  4. Just play carefully. Some aggressive moves your opponent makes turn out to be no threat whatsoever, so think before you react. Similarly, sometimes defensive moves can turn the game on its head.

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