3

What is the best defense as white against the Grunfeld Defense?

I have been playing the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit over and over again, I suspect some opponents notice this, and open up with 1... Nf6, so this gets me off guard. I usually try to continue the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit, but black normally goes a different route.

  • 1.e2-e4! (just joking) What do you mean with "best"? Best score based on database games between grandmasters during the last 5 years? Best practical chances? Best to prepare? Please be more specific! – Ray May 23 '12 at 13:15
  • Best preparation. Overall I guess. – xaisoft May 23 '12 at 18:09
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First off, 1...Nf6 against 1. d4 is not the Gruenfeld Defense: this opening is defined by an order of moves 3 deep. See the Wikipedia page.

In your case after 1. d4 Nf6 simply play 2. Nc3 and you will be well on your way to getting a Blackmar-Diemer, because if Black doesn't play 2...d5 you will play 3. e4 and you will get your pawn to e4 without having to gambit it: almost like an improved Blackmar-Diemer.

But if Black plays 2...d5 in response to 2. Nc3 then 3. e4 is the Blackmar-Diemer, after 3...dxe4 4. f3, just via a different move order (a "transposition"). See Wikipedia's page for the Blackmar-Diemer.

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2

Try this link. This will give you enough search words to find additional information about variations you might explore. Ultimately, you'll have to decide what's best for you. If there were a 'best' move, chances are 1... Nf6 would be a blunder.

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0

Attempt to preserve your big center. In the exchange variation, the center can't advance, but if you play the Russian variation, you can advance your centre because there is less pressure on it. However, in this variation, be careful not to overextend your position.

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