2

If someone could put a picture of the layout in that'd be great, I've looked (clicked edit) on posts with them and I cannot work out the format, also this is a setup, I didn't write down how I got there.

This is a game I was playing against my "Train board" on a train so not my finest work but I ended up in this situation and in the end "resigned" (turned it off), and what I've tried from here

[FEN "r4rk1/pp3ppp/2n1p3/q2p1b2/1b1PnB2/1QN2NPP/PP2PPB1/2R2RK1 w - - 0 1"]

1. g4 (1. Nxe4 dxe4 2. Ne5 Nxd4 {I've noted this was a good move for black, that I missed} 3. Qc4 (3. Qe3 Qd5 4. Qc3 Bxc3) Qd5 4. Qxb4 {play suspected trap for interest} (4. Qxd5 exd5 5. Rc7) Nxe2+) Bg6 2. Qa4 Nxc3 3. bxc3 {Stopped playing, loose queen} 0-1

Now I think (I wrote) that I opened very well and I seemed fairly happy with the moves before these, the move before this starts though I went from waiting room to train and I'm easily distracted by the scenery. So please no "idiot, who does that!" stuff.

I really think black has the stronger position by far, but the midgame can very easily turn.

2

Can white recover?

White is just fine. Sure, Black stands slightly better due to his better coordinated minor pieces, but the position is roughly equal.

If someone could put a picture of the layout in that'd be great, I've looked (clicked edit) on posts with them and I cannot work out the format, also this is a setup, I didn't write down how I got there.

This thread covers the topic pretty good in my opinion.

I really think black has the stronger position by far, but the midgame can very easily turn.

I believe that opening went something like this:

[fen ""]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Bf4 Bf5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.g3 e6 8.Qb3 Bb4 9.Bg2 O-O 10.O-O Qa5 11.Rac1 Ne4 12.Rfd1!?

Here, White's last move fortifies the d4 pawn, leaving e2 pawn free which might be useful in some lines.

Sure, Black has aggressively posted minor pieces, but White finished development and is now ready to push them back. This means that Black will have to make exchanges which will reduce his pressure, or will have to fall back giving the initiative to White.

Therefore, I believe that the resulting position after Rfd1!? is unclear, with chances for both sides.

Since we look at this from White's perspective, it would be good if Black exchanged on c3 and if White could then get Black's lightsquared bishop for f3 knight. With a fortified d4 pawn he could launch e4 in appropriate moment in order to open his position for his bishops. In such position Nc6 would be badly posted since d4 pawn is fortified with c3 pawn.

Just for an example, I provide a sample line:

[fen ""]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Bf4 Bf5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.g3 e6 8.Qb3 Bb4 9.Bg2 O-O 10.O-O Qa5 11.Rac1 Ne4 12.Rfd1!? Rac8!? 13.Nh4 Nxc3 14.bxc3 Ba3 15.Ra1 Bg6 16.Nxg6 hxg6 17.e4+/=

Best regards.

| improve this answer | |
  • I am glad I posted because I really enjoyed reading this answer! I've also learnt not to associate the feeling of being on guard with being in a bad position – Alec Teal Mar 27 '14 at 17:02
  • @AlecTeal: I am glad I was helpful. Always look at the position objectively. If your plans did not fulfill that does not mean that you stand worse, it just means that things have changed. This is normal in chess, all you have to do is take a fresh look on the resulting position and devise a new plan. Best regards. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Mar 28 '14 at 6:47

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