5

I am looking for a resource that describes plans for both sides in the following pawn structure:

[Title "Queenside vs Kingside pawn majority"]
[fen "8/pp3ppp/4p3/8/2P5/8/PP3PPP/8 w - - 0 1"]

This pawn structure can arise from the Caro-Kann, or Rubinstein French, as far as I know.

I could use books or online resources that cover plans for both sides in a very comprehensive manner. I am especially interested for game plans of the side with the kingside pawn majority.

After searching through Internet I was not able to find anything, so I really hope I will have more luck here.

EDIT #2:

On member Rauan Sagit's request, I am providing a game I played against Shredder with difficulty level set on hard. I must add that I took back moves twice in the bishop ending and those moves shall be listed as sidelines. Both times I had to resign. Third time I took 3 minutes to look at the board and calculate the lines, which enabled me to properly draw:

[White "Shredder Online, hard level"]
[Black "AlwaysLearningNewStuff"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[fen ""]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Bd3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.Nf3 c5 8.O-O Be7 9.Be3 Qc7 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.Qd2 Bxe3 12.Qxe3 O-O 13.Ne5 b6 14.c4 Bb7 15.Rad1 Rfd8 16.Bb1 Rac8 17.Rfe1 h6 18.a3 a5 19.b4 axb4 20.axb4 Ba6 21.b5 Bb7 22.f3 Rd6 23.Rxd6 Qxd6 24.Qd3 Rd8 25.Qxd6 Rxd6 26.Kf2 Nd7 27.Nxd7 Rxd7 28.Ke3 Kf8 29.Rc1 Ke7 30.c5 bxc5 31.Rxc5 Kd6 32.Rc1 Rc7 ( 32...e5?! ) 33. Rxc7 Kxc7 34.Bd3 Kb6 35.Kd4 f6 36.Kc4 Bd5+! ( 36...e5?! ) 37.Kd4 Bb3! 38.Kc3 Bd5 39.Kd4 Bb3 40.Kc3 Bd5 41.Kd4 1/2-1/2

I must admit that in the past I have relinquished the d-file way too easily trying to reach the endgame as fast as possible. After reading through the member Rauan Sagit's answer, I have decided to reread M.Shereshevsky-Endgame Strategy again, and after reading through another book he wrote ( Mastering the endgame-Volume 1 ), I was able to understand the importance of contesting the d-file. It was not too hard to find 22...Rd6! which enabled me to contest the d-file and enabled me a smooth transition to the equal endgame.

I will test this approach in more games, and will read the recommended book Romanovsky-Middlegame method first, before I decide to officially accept the answer. Thanks Rauan!

Here is another game that illustrates the problems I face in a much better way:

[White "Shredder Online, hard level"]
[Black "AlwaysLearningNewStuff"]
[fen ""]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Bd3 Ngf6 6.Qe2 c5 7.Nxf6+ Nf6 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.Bg5 Be7 10.Nf3 h6 11.Bf4 O-O 12.O-O Qb6 13.c3 Rd8 14.Nd4 Bd7 15.a4 a5 16.Be5 Be8 17.h3 Rac8 18.Rfd1 Rd5 19.Nb5 Bc6 20.h4 Qd8 21.Na7 Ra8 22.Nxc6 bxc6 23.c4 Rd7 24.Qf3 c5 25.Bxf6 Bxf6 26.Bh7++- Kxh7 27.Rxd7 Qxd7 28.Qe4+! g6 29.Qxa8 Bxb2 30.Rb1 Qd2 31.Qb7 Bg7 32.Qxf7 Qc2 33.Rb7 Qd1+ 34.Kh2 Qd6 35.f4 Qd4 36.Re7 h5 37.Rxe6 Qd3 38.Rc6 1-0

Here I had no idea what to do after 18.Rfd1. This game illustrates exactly the problem I face:

White has more space, better minor pieces and slight pressure. I really do not know how to defend here. To make matters even worse, on the highest level Rubinstein French is said not to give Black full equality and this was not even the sharpest line.

I have fixed the typo in the game for White's 24. move.

END OF EDIT

Thank you.

Best regards.

5

The main idea can be summarized as follows

The deciding factor is the control over the open d-file

Thus, you should play this position with one, two or three heavy pieces each still on the board and make sure you will control the d-file. As usual, invade the seventh rank, bring your king to the center (as long as the king is safe when doing so) and cramp the opponent.

EDIT (2014-03-14):

If you want to win this position, you should exchange down to a rook endgame where you control the d-file. If you want to prevent a loss, you should avoid a position where your opponent exchanges down to a rook endgame where the opponent controls the d-file. The middlegame (more pieces on the board) adds more complexity. Learn the clean cut case and that will guide you in more complex situations.

  • But how to defend from queenside majority? The exchange of heavy pieces seem inevitable, and then side with the queenside pawns has near-decisive advantage. I guess "weaker" side should "stay in the middlegame" for as long as possible, but this is not easy. Can you recommend some books/online resources ? I did found one good online resource but it regards endgame, yet I need something that outlines defending resources for the side with the kingside pawn majority. Perhaps my question was not clear, should I rephrase it ? I find it more useful the way it is phrased now. Thank you. +1 from me. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Mar 13 '14 at 18:33
  • 1
    @AlwaysLearningNewStuff if you want to win this position, you should exchange down to a rook endgame where you control the d-file. If you want to prevent a loss, you should avoid a position where your opponent exchanges down to a rook endgame where the opponent controls the d-file. The middlegame (more pieces on the board) adds more complexity. Learn the clean cut case and that will guide you in more complex situations. Cheers. – Rauan Sagit Mar 13 '14 at 22:20
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    @AlwaysLearningNewStuff add a game example in your question and I or others can give you some pointers. Also, consider working with Romanovsky's book "Middlegame Method". Cheers. – Rauan Sagit Mar 15 '14 at 9:42
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    Updated my OP, now searching the recommended book. Already your advice has payed off-see the details of my edit. Before I accept, I need to verify this 100%, and that requires more than one quick game to be played. Until then thank you and best regards. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Mar 15 '14 at 20:42
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    Hans Langrock wrote a book on Rubinstein French, and that helped me a lot. Basically his advice was the same as yours -> contest d-file. Since there was no theory easily available on this opening I had to analyze it myself. Hans offered improvements that solved my problems. I have officially accepted your answer because the main point is indeed to contest d-file. I have already upvoted it earlier. Thanks again. Best regards until next time. – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Oct 16 '15 at 1:15
1

The book mentioned in a comment by @Rauan Sagit has been translated to English: Endgame Strategy by Mikhail Shereshevsky (Everyman Chess) (1st First Edition) [Paperback] and can be found on Amazon.

  • Thanks, I have already got the book and read it. I have upvoted your answer as a small token of gratitude :) – AlwaysLearningNewStuff Oct 16 '15 at 1:12
  • For the collectors among us, it's important to know that this is only the "first edition" that has been published by Everyman Publishing. Everyman took over Cadogan Books, which actually published the real first edition in 1994. ISBN 1857440633. I don't know why they claim it's a first edition; even the cover art is identical, but if the content is changed it's not the same book, and if it's not, it's a reprint. – jaxter Oct 9 '16 at 18:06

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