-1

I play as white. I have a rook and queen and 5 pawns while the opponent has a knight and two pawns. I hope I can win this game. But is it legal to take the knight in next move? Then the opponent will have only two pawns with the King. Can I still play after that and win the game?

1
  • 7
    I don't see the position so this cannot be answered. Can you paste the FEN into your text at least? Or a pic would be better.
    – ezaspi
    Dec 13 '13 at 13:01
6

It's perfectly legal to take his knight and his two pawns, then promote all your five pawns, and mate him with rook and six queens. Watch out for stalemate, he must be able to move his king without going into check at all times.

There are no rules saying you can't take any more of your opponent's pieces.

3
  • "There are no rules saying you can't take any more of your opponent's pieces." Pins can prevent it. Although this is not going to happen in the OPs description of material. It cannot be said whether it is legal to take any pieces without seeing the position. I think this should be down voted. Sorry.
    – ezaspi
    Dec 13 '13 at 16:10
  • There are no rules specifically saying you can't take any more of your opponent's pieces. Of course you can't take a piece if, for example, it leaves you in check. That sort of exception isn't relevant to the OP's question.
    – dfan
    Dec 13 '13 at 17:26
  • It's not clear what is relevant to the OPs question since we can't see the position. :)
    – ezaspi
    Dec 16 '13 at 23:58
1

A quick answer is that it is legal as long as you are not in check and you will not be in check immediately after making the move and you are moving your pieces according to the rules. The only risk I can see with grabbing the knight is that you can cause a stalemate and the game will be drawn. A stalemate is where your opponent cannot make any legal moves and at the same time the opponent's king is not in check.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.