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The best way to understand this question is probably imagine a situation where the player can peek at his opponent next move after each potential move of the player. In other words, The player knows what will be the opp response for e4 and what is the response to 1...e5 and what is their response to 1.e4 etc.

Now, for a novice player to have that ability to foresee the future will greatly increase their ELO, since many times a novice player "does not see/consider a move" -- and occasionally hanging pieces in one-move which now could be avoided. But even strong players are meet with a move they did not consider. Lets look at maybe-real example:

[FEN ""]
[StartPly "41"]
[Event "Tata Steel Chess Masters 2023"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2023.01.22"]
[Round "08"]
[White "Caruana, Fabiano"]
[Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2766"]
[BlackElo "2859"]
[TimeControl "6000+30"]

1. e4 {[%clk 1:40:57]} 1... e5 {[%clk 1:40:29]} 2. Nf3 {[%clk 1:41:22]} 2... Nc6
{[%clk 1:40:55]} 3. Bb5 {[%clk 1:41:48]} 3... a6 {[%clk 1:41:17]} 4. Ba4 {[%clk
1:42:14]} 4... Nf6 {[%clk 1:41:41]} 5. O-O {[%clk 1:42:35]} 5... Be7 {[%clk
1:42:04]} 6. Re1 {[%clk 1:42:45]} 6... b5 {[%clk 1:42:28]} 7. Bb3 {[%clk
1:43:11]} 7... O-O {[%clk 1:42:49]} 8. a4 {[%clk 1:43:29]} 8... b4 {[%clk
1:43:10]} 9. a5 {[%clk 1:43:29]} 9... d6 {[%clk 1:43:26]} 10. c3 {[%clk
1:43:41]} 10... Rb8 {[%clk 1:43:14]} 11. h3 {[%clk 1:43:57]} 11... h6 {[%clk
1:32:46]} 12. d4 {[%clk 1:44:06]} 12... bxc3 {[%clk 1:32:39]} 13. bxc3 {[%clk
1:44:27]} 13... exd4 {[%clk 1:32:58]} 14. Nxd4 {[%clk 1:44:17]} 14... Bd7 {[%clk
1:27:10]} 15. Bf4 {[%clk 1:37:45]} 15... Ne5 {[%clk 1:15:38]} 16. Na3 {[%clk
1:30:55]} 16... Re8 {[%clk 1:11:52]} 17. Bg3 {[%clk 1:07:36]} 17... Bf8 {[%clk
1:08:41]} 18. f4 {[%clk 1:03:39]} 18... Nc6 {[%clk 1:08:40]} 19. e5 {[%clk
0:55:37]} 19... dxe5 {[%clk 1:08:26]} 20. fxe5 {[%clk 0:56:03]} 20... Nxd4
{[%clk 1:08:47]} 21. cxd4 {[%clk 0:56:28]} 21... Bc6 {[%clk 1:09:04]} 22. Bc2
{[%clk 0:37:48]} 22... Qd5 {[%clk 1:05:52]} 23. Re2 {[%clk 0:38:13]} 23... Rb4
{[%clk 1:04:34]} 24. Kh2 {[%clk 0:27:50]} 24... Rxd4 {[%clk 1:04:12]} 25. Qb1
{[%clk 0:28:09]} 25... Ne4 {[%clk 0:49:50]} 26. Bxe4 {[%clk 0:25:45]} 26... Rxe4
{[%clk 0:50:17]} 27. Rxe4 {[%clk 0:26:10]} 27... Qxe4 {[%clk 0:50:41]} 28. Qxe4
{[%clk 0:26:37]} 28... Bxe4 {[%clk 0:50:58]} 29. Nc4 {[%clk 0:27:05]} 29... Rb8
{[%clk 0:49:13]} 30. Rc1 {[%clk 0:26:33]} 30... Rb5 {[%clk 0:47:25]} 31. e6
{[%clk 0:26:47]} 31... fxe6 {[%clk 0:47:02]} 32. Bxc7 {[%clk 0:26:25]} 32... Rc5
{[%clk 0:47:01]} 33. Bf4 {[%clk 0:25:13]} 33... Bd5 {[%clk 0:47:26]} 0-1

[The "surprising move" is 21.. Bc6. (This is not even a good example as White was not even losing after 21.cxd4 - But the only example I could distinctly remember a GM says White "didn't see" the move.

Now, clearly the upside given by this enhanced ability is only limited for it gives you only one-move calculation advantage. But more specifically I want to know how often GMs are surprised by a (good) move; or they are usually never surprised - just slowly outplayed to lose the game.

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