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For the sake of having an example re Why was the 2019 WFRCC called 'slow rapid' when it's actually classical (45+15=60)? where 60 minutes is exactly the border between rapid and classical:

Is there any tournament whose time controls convert to exactly 60 minutes and then FIDE indeed considers it really classical not rapid?

Note: I've already found a tournament, albeit in chess960 not in regular chess, where 60 minutes is not considered classical. The whole point of this question is that by the letter of the law / in theory / de jure, it should be considered classical even if in some cases it is unrated. But in practice / de facto, has there been any such tournament of exactly 60 minutes in FIDE's, what, 150 year history?

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According to the FIDE Laws of Chess:

Appendix A. Rapid Chess

A.1 A ‘Rapid chess’ game is one where either all the moves must be completed in a fixed time of more than 10 minutes but less than 60 minutes for each player; or the time allotted plus 60 times any increment is of more than 10 minutes but less than 60 minutes for each player.

So, every "tournament whose time controls convert to exactly 60 minutes" is regarded as classical by FIDE. It is just that FIDE will only rate such tournaments for lower rated players. Slower time controls are required for stronger players. For stronger players there is a range of time controls which FIDE will not rate because they are too slow to be rapid and too quick for stronger players.

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  • This is the whole point. In theory it should be considered classical even if unrated. But in practice, is there any such tournament? I mean, I've already found a tournament, albeit not in regular chess, where 60 minutes is not considered classical.
    – BCLC
    Feb 13, 2023 at 5:37

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