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I read that for increment games the way to convert them to non-increment games for the purpose of classification by time control goes as follows:

  • Original time + Increment x 40 = Time used to classify

Eg 10min + 3sec increment is

  • 10min + 3sec x 40 = 10min + 2min = 12min

So, if according to some federation or website, 11min is the cut-off between rapid & blitz, then 10min+0sec increment would be blitz while 10min+3sec increment would be rapid. But besides classification, every increment game can then be converted into a non-increment game as such.

Question: What's the conversion for time controls that give time bonuses after reaching a certain move into time controls are just X min + 0 increment (for the whole game) ?

Examples:

1 - 2022 Candidates:

120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves, and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, plus a 30-second increment per move starting from move 61.

2 - 2023 Tata Steel:

The time control is 100 minutes for 40 moves followed by 50 minutes for 20 moves, then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment per move from move one

3 - 2019 WFRCC:

45 minutes for 40 moves plus 15 minutes for the rest, without increment

4 - 2022 WFRCC:

The time control (for both the group stages and the knockouts) will be 25 minutes per player for the first 30 moves, after which each player will receive additional 5 minutes on the clock and an increment of 5 seconds per move starting from move 31.

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    I was going to say, such time controls are always classical because players need to write down their moves in order to show they have made the required number of moves, and in rapid writing down moves isn't required. But then I saw that 2022 WFRCC time control. That's weird. Jan 30 at 21:34
  • @RemcoGerlich There was an OTB portion of a 9LX or FRC or 960 tournament where players are required to write down moves? Was the 2019 WFRCC classical?
    – BCLC
    Feb 1 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

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I read that for increment games the way to convert them to non-increment games for the purpose of classification by time control goes as follows:

Original time + Increment x 40 = Time used to classify

If you did read that (no reference given) then you read wrong. "Game time" is based on a game lasting 60 moves according to the latest FIDE rating regulations:

  1. Rate of Play

1.1 For a game to be rated each player must at the start of the tournament have the following minimum periods in which to complete all the moves, assuming the game lasts 60 moves

1 - So, for

120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves, and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, plus a 30-second increment per move starting from move 61.

the game time (time for first 60 moves) is 180 minutes (120+60+0) i.e. players have 180 minutes to play 60 moves

2 - For

The time control is 100 minutes for 40 moves followed by 50 minutes for 20 moves, then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with a 30-second increment per move from move one

the game time (time for first 60 moves) is 180 minutes (100+50+30) i.e. players have 180 minutes to play 60 moves

3 - For

45 minutes for 40 moves plus 15 minutes for the rest, without increment

the game time (time for first 60 moves) is 60 minutes (45+15) i.e. players have 60 minutes to play 60 moves

4 - For

The time control (for both the group stages and the knockouts) will be 25 minutes per player for the first 30 moves, after which each player will receive additional 5 minutes on the clock and an increment of 5 seconds per move starting from move 31.

the game time (time for first 60 moves) is 32.5 minutes (25+5+2.5) i.e. players have 32.5 minutes to play 60 moves. That is 30 minutes for the first 30 moves then 5 minutes plus 2.5 minutes of increment for the next 30 moves.

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