1

In this game, my actual move was Qg6, leaving the knight on f3.

Why does chess.com suggest Ne1+ ?

I figure it would just be taken by the rook, but the engine suggested white would have played Kf1.

The text says this will win the white queen. I don't get it.

Ne1+ Kf1

1
  • 1
    Always check all checks. After 31 Rxe1 what can black do?
    – Ian Bush
    Jan 20, 2023 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

4

The idea of 1...Ne1 is to distract the Rook from the defense of h2, so the Black Queen would go to h2. For example:

If 2.Rxe1 Rxf2 check (attraction) 3.Kxf2 Qh2 check 4.Kf1 Rf8 check 5.Qf7 Rxf7 checkmate.

In addition, if 2.Kf1 Qxe3, with the idea of 3... Qxf2 checkmate.

If White would not capture the Knight, Black has brought that Knight to the attack, and the h3 square is free for the Black Queen. For example:

If 2.Kg1 Qh3 with the idea of Qg2 checkmate.

4
  • 1
    Thank you. This is really well explained. I didn't look beyond losing the knight, or if I did, didn't think of the Rf2+ decoy to let the queen in.
    – Stewart
    Jan 21, 2023 at 12:25
  • 1
    @Stewart You are very welcome! I encourage you to post new questions when you have a doubt. I like to believe that asking questions is the path to wisdom.
    – Beginner
    Jan 24, 2023 at 3:51
  • 1
    And indeed, thank you for welcoming questions, and not making me feel stupid! :)
    – Stewart
    Jan 24, 2023 at 9:29
  • 1
    @Stewart Chess is a challenging task. We all must learn. Learning never ends. Also, when you ask you help others to learn.
    – Beginner
    Jan 24, 2023 at 18:09
1

The other answer covers everything but I'll add that what engine analysis says about a totally winning position doesn't matter much. Here Stockfish can see the mate in 5, so it goes for that. If you can't, you'll just play some simpler move and your position will still be winning.

Also, if you don't understand an engine's suggestion (like Kf1 instead of Rxe1), you can play the move you think is better and see how the engine reacts to it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.